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7 Strangest Audio Discoveries in Video Games – Part II


Sometimes you hear something in a
video game so unexpected… [crazy gibberish audio from Tony Hawk Underground] It seems to stick with you for days… [gibberish] [gibberish] This is why they were diving into the top
7 strangest audio discoveries in video games that still remain unsolved
to this day part two brought to you by Dashlane. [gibberish] Red Dead Redemption 2. In a particularly
unusual audio discovery, players such as belgiumsheepdog were playing through
Red Dead Redemption 2 when suddenly they realized there was something off with
the protagonists voice… “Good Mornin'” In fact perhaps only because of a
completely inexplicable glitch it wasn’t even his voice at all! “Mornin’ partner!”
“A very good morning to you!” But actually the adult voice of Jack Marston, a
character who appeared as an adult at the end of the original Red Dead
Redemption but never as an adult in Red Dead Redemption 2. “You have a fine
morning Ma’am!” “Good morning to ya sir!” Creating an extremely unusual glitch where the main character
was using the voice of someone who didn’t even appear in the game! “Good day, miss!”
Making matters even more confusing, a random non-player character
was later found affected with the same glitch.. “You had my nerves humming.” How the mysterious recordings are
being triggered into the game or what the purpose of the recordings were even
doing in Red Dead Redemption 2 in the first place, remains a mystery… “Morning Partner!”
Leaving many to believe that Jack’s future in the series may be far from
over. “You have a fine morning ma’am!” Ma’am?
That’s clearly.. not a woman! “Another day!” [woman’s voice] Oh my god I have no idea what to trust
anymore! Asterix and Obelix XXL. Thanks to pyramidensurfer for submitting me this
odd discovery on my discord server. Asterix is one of the world’s most
famous comic book characters with theme parks, movies, and board games.. unless you
live in America where the character is practically unknown. Despite this, several
titles of Asterix have made it to the US including Asterix and Obelix
XXL, rebranded as Kick Buttix in the States. A mystery haunting Kick
Buttix since released in 2003 are a couple of unsettling and unexplained
audio discoveries that could be found on the game’s last mission, as players
thought they could hear the faint cries of a baby beyond this random
inaccessible gate in the level. Pyramidensurfer couldn’t let the
question the other side taunt him any further, and in the 2018, 15 years after the
game’s release, he created a camera hack so he could see
exactly what was on the other side.. and while he wasn’t able to find anything
physically back there, he definitely confirmed there to be a baby crying
clear as day behind the gate… [baby wailing] Why? And as terrifying as that is an even more
frightening audio was found only a few steps away as youtuber the crass dude
found an extremely unsettling whisper if they stood in front of these boxes,
which are so quiet I actually had the amplify the audio quite significantly… [whispers] What the [bleep]? Well
that definitely didn’t sound like English to me. Considering the developers
of Kick Buttix originate from France really hoping one of my French-speaking
viewers can provide a translation. Merci in advance! [whisper] Bloodborne. Thanks to Grace Daniel for submitting me this in the comments of the last audio
discoveries video, players found at random times in the game if they visited
the old abandoned workshop, turned up the ambient track in the game options
and stood in this totally random spot in the garden, they could hear a rather
creepy loop of a woman laughing and saying yes over and over… “[giggling] …yes… [giggling] … yes…” That’s spooky!
Some theorists suggest that this was an easter egg implying relations between
the nearby characters Gehrman and his doll although others felt this theory was
inconsistent and a little far-fetched mostly given the game portrayed their
relationship as largely innocent. Not only that, it was later discovered the
audio doesn’t originate from the doll at all and instead originates from a
completely random piece of dialogue found in a totally different scene of
the game… “Yes… [giggling] … yes!” With this knowledge many players believe something much more
cryptic is going on here, that possibly wasn’t even intended.. further back by the
fact that From Software games tend to have a reputation for strange audio
glitches.. “From Software” …evidenced by the many submissions I’ve received for
their original title Dark Souls, where players such as User 13 and
bottomlessrainbow have submitted to me startling sounds that only occur on the map
Firelink Shire… [large and distant screeching] …before eventually deteriorating into a
nasty distortion… [distortion]
Ugh… horrible!! But while that discovery is almost definitely the result of a
glitch, the Bloodborne audio’s original purpose remains a highly contentious
debate, with no firm confirmation what the audio is supposed to be in years.. why
would such a strange snippet of audio be repeating over and over in such a random spot of the game? Intentional or not this one legit gives me the creeps. “[giggling] … yes!” Call of Duty Modern Warfare 3. Thanks to Gulargambone for submitting this
intriguing mystery on my discord server, as data miners made an unusual
discovery in the files for the game’s final mission: Dust to Dust.
In the data for the game three mysterious audio files were found tied to the game’s
ending that couldn’t be found anywhere else in the game… that were titled Dubai
Finale Now, Dubai Shadow Man exit, and Dubai Finale Ominous Stranger. Now normally,
the game ends pretty standardly with you taking out the game’s main villain
Vladimir Makarov finalizing with you lighting a cigar as you stare at
his body… very standard stuff… but playing these newly found audio files together
at once paints a far more mysterious picture… Dataminers also found leftover strings
of text in the mission scripts that said Mysterious Stranger Rimlight, Dubai Finale Stranger appears, and Finale Shadow Man exit. While no dialogue has been found
that originally belonged to this missing ending, hackers discovered that the audio
files for Makarov himself which do appear in the game were nowhere to be
found in the files for the map, nor anywhere! So it is possible the dialogue
for the ending still exists somewhere, albeit hidden from plain sight along
with the rest of Makarov’s audio. All this seems a bit surreal, perhaps too enigmatic for a Call of Duty title… Unfortunately, being evidence is slim
over what exactly this alternate ending actually is… who the hell the Shadow Man
or mysterious stranger is supposed to be may just be a mystery where we’ll never
know the answer… Watchdogs 2. Previously on my video
Unsolved Mysteries Part 3, I discussed how in Ubisoft title Far Cry 5, players
could find chilling audio bleeding through their car radio if they drove to
certain locations in the game… that almost sounded as though a woman on
the other side was crying for help… Well, strangely enough, it appears as
though the same sort of thing has been found in another Ubisoft game, Watchdogs 2, as the game at one point provides the ability to hack random strangers texts and
calls… most of which are fairly unexciting… not the case for players Jacob
and Nicholas Miller who both submitted their discoveries to me separately
through oddheader.com. Both managed to record extremely rare instances of
unusual audio interferences that no one’s ever replicated since… [garbled audio] Collectively Jacob and Nicholas Miller
have both played Watchdogs a total of 1600 hours, well above any game’s normal
playtime. In the audio they reported hearing what I noticed was very similar
to the previous reports from Far Cry 5 as they could hear a woman weeping and cries for help once again. [distorted audio] However, none of it compares to the audio interference
Jacob found when he went to hack this random car enthusiast’s phone, he heard
something that he’s never found again… [strange loud groan] Woah! What the [bleep]? [groaning] Scared the [bleep] outta me! Mortal Kombat 3. Thanks to David Stein who was inspired by the last audio mystery video to
submit this discovery he made on Mortal Kombat 3 on cd-rom… Quick bit of
background: to save on the limited processing power of home computers in
the 90s, game audio on CD-ROMs wasn’t actually programmed in the games
themselves, but was actually played directly from the disc into the
computer speakers separately while you played the game… this meant you couldn’t
actually datamine Mortal Kombat 3’s audio from the data of the game, but
instead could only access them by inserting the disk into a CD player like
you would a normal audio CD. Most of the game’s standard audio could be found
ranging from tracks 1 to 46 [game sound effect] But on track 47 something unexpected
plays that can’t be found anywhere in the game… First off, we got a pretty funky
groove going, when suddenly a rather unexpected, fairly jarring backwards
voice begins to emerge out of the absurdity… [backwards audio and funky groove] Reversing the audio things get
even weirder, as when we play it back it’s a rather goofy sounding voice
reciting the Lewis Carroll poem ‘Tis The Voice of The Lobster.. No clue what’s going on here…
What the purpose of this audio is or what the developers were smoking when
they came up with this one… is still a mystery. The Stanley Parable. A rather
unusual mystery exists on the first-person narrative game The Stanley
Parable before you even start the game, brought to my attention by Ashley Simple
and Little Ring on my discord server.. in the distortion of office sounds in the
background of the main menu, muffled dialogue can be heard that when enhanced
for some reason sounds like a manager chastising employee over what he
considers to be a false claim to HR… And at this point it sounds like the
manager has a complete change in attitude and completely lets the
employee go… Honestly the question is why the hell
something like this is even here? Perhaps someone out there can transcribe this
better than I can, but honestly I don’t think it’s gonna give us a better idea
why the hell anyone would include something like this in the first place…
and just as a few these developers very likely never wanted these discoveries to
ever be found, you may be just as concerned of your own sensitive
materials being discovered and leaked out into the world… don’t forget that
Funimation is still in hot water over some incredibly awkward audio files that were
leaked from the new Dragonball Z game… “Yes it is true! Tommy don’t not lie. He likes big butts. He cannot lie.” …Which may be why you want to save
yourself from the same embarrassment with the extra level of security that
dashlane provides. Dashlane can be your one-stop shop for your digital identity
by managing all your passwords so that you don’t have to keep track of each one. Dashlane works across all devices including Apple products PCs Android
Safari and Chrome. Dashlane also has a secure autofill feature that works for
personal information and credit cards saving you time when shopping online, a
VPN to prevent prying eyes from tracking and helping you access content anywhere
plus dark web monitoring to see if your information is being bought and sold
illegally. To give it a try for free go to dashlane.com/oddheader and use my
promo code on how to get 10% off if you want to upgrade to premium.. if you
enjoyed this video please subscribe and if you know of any other mysteries or
discoveries that I didn’t cover here let me know in the comments down below,
submit to oddheader.com or even give me a shout on my Twitter or reddit. Stay tuned!

LGR – The Sims 4 Tiny Living Stuff Review

January 25, 2020 | Articles, Blog | 85 Comments

LGR – The Sims 4 Tiny Living Stuff Review


[jazzed-out jazz music] Finally, a stuff pack that’s precisely what
I always wanted! The Sims 4 Tiny Living Stuff, where your sims
are shrunk down to a fraction of the size due to a mishap involving a baseball and a
broken window, and then — what? -It’s about tiny homes.
-Aw man really? I guess that makes more sense, sigh. All right so yeah, the pack’s called Tiny
Living Stuff, but instead of awesome shrunken adventures, it’s all about living in a relatively
undersized home. It costs $10 and is the sixteenth Sims 4 stuff
pack to date good grief what the balls. And I gotta say, even though I’d be way
more into a pack about miniaturized sims, I was still intrigued by Tiny Living here. Because yeah man, I’ve been rather tiny-curious
for years now, immediately sucked into all the YouTube channels and reality shows focusing
on the Tiny House Movement. And the whole idea is to make the most out
of a small space, rejecting the concept of buying a multi-thousand square foot home. I myself live in a house that’s about 800
square feet or 74 square meters, and while objectively not “tiny,” it’s certainly
a lot smaller than I could’ve chosen and that was very much on purpose. I’ve enjoyed the challenge of trying to
make the most of the space I have without piling a million things on top of each other,
so the chance to do so virtually in the The Sims 4 is absolutely my cup of nitro cold brewed
coffee. The first thing you’re greeted with on installing Tiny Living Stuff is a message about living in a tiny house and stuff. A pre-made tiny home has been provided to
plop down anywhere you like, acting as an example of what exactly constitutes a tiny
home in The Sims 4 universe. In case you’re unaware, a real life tiny
house is generally considered to be one under 37 square meters or 400 square feet. This example home in The Sims 4 is composed
of 32 tiles, and if we assume each tile is a square meter, then we’ve got 32 square
meters or 350 square feet, a bit below that of a tiny house IRL. However, Tiny Living Stuff lays out three
different tiers of tiny house, each with its own perks and requirements. The smallest being the Tier 1 “Micro Home”
at up to 32 tiles in size, Tier 2 is a “Tiny Home” at up to 64 tiles, and Tier 3 is a
“Small Home” at up to 100 tiles. The most fascinating aspect of these tiered
home sizes is that when you meet the requirements on a lot designed as a Residential Tiny Home, you’re provided a number of generous rewards for living there. Things separate from lot traits, like faster
learning, greater comfort, happier sims, healthier plants, and better relationships. So the less you do with doing more, the more
you’re rewarded for doing more with less! Er, by that I mean that, as of now, there’s
incentives to go small and a kind of odd punishment for having a huge house. Makes me wonder if they’ll balance it out
with a mansion-focused pack in the future. Heck they could even call it The Sims 4 Livin’
Large, I’d be down with that. Anyway yeah, this is a stuff pack packed with
stuff so let’s unpack it and stuff! First is an allotment of hair, accessories,
and clothing for pretty much everyone this time around, including the younginz. Fitting right in with the overall “hygge”
theme of living in a warm little cozy home, there’s a bunch of warm, cozy attire. Regardless of how much I want some of those
sweaters for real though, that’s just the garb and garment goods. Let’s get onto the main event, kicking off
with an assortment of single-tile desks and tables, suitable for all manner of desking
and tabling. Followed by a few decorative yet functional
items, including a lamp, readable books, and lighttable candles in a cluttered tray. Three chesty wardrobe shelving type things
for holding various objects and clothing. A patterned rug for plopping down in the middle
of the backyard or wherever. A pretty standard toilet and a sink that handily
works off-the-grid. Two TVs, one standing and one that attaches
to a wall, each pulling quadruple duty by also acting as a display shelf, a bookcase,
and a stereo. Various other wall-mountable items are here
too, including a mirror, a door, two shelves of random thingies, four potted plants strung
together, and a plant-inspired piece of artwork. Three sets of hanging light bulbs, each with
their own varying degrees of droopiness. An ottoman, that isn’t an ottoman I guess,
since it’s a pouffe? Whatever it is cats love it. There’s also a standard bed and a standard
loveseat. As well as this lamp that should provide storage
space according to its description, yet it’s totally unusable as such. It’s just a lamp. Seriously, why tout its supposed dual purpose as a shelf and then make it so you can’t set anything on it? At least it makes for decent kindling, so
I guess it does serve a second purpose after all. And finally, you also get three new chairs,
although two of them are slightly confusing at first. This dining chair doesn’t actually function
with the new dining table. For that you have to use these high chairs,
and once I realized that it was pretty awesome, letting me really cram in a buncha seating
in a super small space. Finally, the headlining new items of the Tiny
Living pack are Murphy Beds, with and without a built-in loveseat. And at first this seems pretty useful, since
you can fold them away when not in use and those wardrobe shelving units attach to the
sides for a clean-looking modular design. But really, Murphy Beds are… confusing. While I applaud the addition of new sleepytime
snuggle zones, the usage of them in this pack doesn’t make much practical sense. For one, they require the exact same 3×2 tile
floor space as a normal bed. You get a loveseat on one of them, sure, but
it still leaves tiles of unusable space underneath. And since sims can’t get into bed from the
front, only the sides, you need another set of tiles off to the left and right at least
half a tile wide. The worst part though is this stupid animation
that plays out far too often, where sims try to pull down the bed then fail in spectacular
fashion. It’d be fine if it happened one out of every
20 times or something, but nope, sims fail like every 3 or 4 times you open the dumb
thing. [bed fails, sim gets owned] Making this worse is the fact that this far-too-frequent animation comes with an unusually high risk of killing your sims! bed fails, sim dies] Now, okay, I’m all for new ways to take out bothersome sims, that’s just good times. But “Death by Murphy Bed” seems a bit
silly, and again, it’s tied to an unskippable animation that happens rather often. Yes, there are now bed upgrade options in
the game, accomplishing things like increasing comfort and preventing it from getting stuck. So you can alleviate the issue but still,
I’d rather it wasn’t so prevalent to begin with. And in my opinion, these repetitive slapstick failure animations stopped being cute like fifteen packs ago. So yeah, can’t say I’ll be using Murphy
Beds in my tiny builds going forward, since the way they work is annoying and their inclusion in this particular pack is questionable in the first place. Why not add them in the Discover University
pack, that would’ve made a ton more sense in my book, more so than a pack about itty
bitty 32-tile houses. I really think bunk beds would’ve been an
ideal addition to the Tiny Living pack instead, seeing as bunk beds actually do free up room,
providing two beds in a single 3×1 space. For that matter though, why not add better
loft options? Lofts are a staple of tiny home designs, and
making them in The Sims 4 means adding a second story with a cumbersome full-sized staircase. Ladders are used all the time in real life
tiny homes, but nope, nowhere to be found in Tiny Living. Even spiral staircases would be more space-efficient
but those still aren’t a thing either. For that matter, why not add steeper, narrower
normal stairs? Or at least provide some storage options underneath
them, which again, is something that you see all the time in actual tiny houses. Not that it matters too much I suppose, since
sims all have an infinite household inventory that hides as many items as you like within
a magic unseen void, hrm. Still, while I’m on the topic of things
I wish were included instead of murphy beds, why not convertible futons or pull out sofa
beds? Under-the-counter mini fridges or in-wall
ovens and microwaves? How about portable induction cooktops? Or over-the-sink shelf units and other kinds
of stackable knickknack storage things? Heck, composting toilets, solar power, and
rain catchers would’ve been nice, seeing as we’ve already got off-the-grid lots. Instead we get cumbersomely large homicidal beds and storage lamps that don’t store anything. At least they took the time to add Baby Yoda
to the game, so I guess that means it all evens out in the end, right? Heh, ahh now I’m just being grumpy, when
in reality Tiny Living is not the worst stuff pack by any means. In fact, I think it’s one of the better
ones for my playstyle. It’s just that this daggone game’s been
around for almost six years now, and after sixteen stuff packs, I’m more than a bit
fatigued. There are a number of disappointing aspects
to Tiny Living Stuff, no bones about it, and I know they’ve could’ve added just a bit
more in terms of useful objects and quality of life improvements. But they didn’t, and that’s just kinda
how it goes, we all know that. Still, I’ll personally be using a number
of the items added here going forward, along with building more tiny houses for the challenge
it provides and the rewards it unlocks, so you can glean from that what you will. [gratuitous fiery sim death] And if you enjoyed this look at the Tiny Living
Stuff pack, then maybe check out my let’s play that I did over on my other channel from
what I was just playing this and getting my thoughts together about the pack in the first
place. Or just stick around, there’s more videos
coming up every week on this channel. And as always, thank you for watching LGR!

The Game Industry’s Performative Concern For Children (The Jimquisition)


Rio: “Oh my GooOOood! Ha ha!” [“Born Depressed” by Drill Queen] If research and experts around the world were looking at something you were habitually doing, and these studies said that what you were doing was wrong and harmful. Would you at least stock of your behavior and wonder if maybe, just maybe, you are in the wrong? OR, do you find some other mark to blame? Welcome to the Game Industry, Church of the Eternal Scape Goat. If it’s not pirates it’s used games, if it’s not used games it’s the IGNORANCE of the parents. Those ignorant swines. For you see, that is what’s being implied with the (high-pitched, mocking tone) Get Smart About P.L.A.Y. campaign! The latest campaign by the game industry to pass the buck onto entities that are not themselves. In fact, don’t take my word for it, take the word of this here video starring Rio Ferdinand! Rio: “The Get Smart About P.L.A.Y. campaign” “provides parents and guardians with practical tips” “on how to achieve balance,” “and set parameters on the amount of time and money you spend on play.” Child 1: “Shoot shoot shoot shoot!”
Rio: “Oh noooo! Haha!”
Child 2: “Oh come on!” “It’s all about understanding what games your child is playing.” “Stop moaning about, give me the ball.” “Learning how to install parental controls” “can limit time, spend, or interactions with other players.” “Discussing about the amount of game time, and agreeing limits together.” Child 1: “What’re you doing?!”
Rio: “Hahaha!” Remembering that the controls for you,” “as a parent or guardian, in the driving seat.” (excited shouts, cheering, and laughing) “You wouldn’t give your child a bike without providing a helmet and stabilizers.” Jim: What? WHAT? Stabilizers on a kid’s bike? Is that where you’re going with this? Is that what this has come to? You’re comparing protecting kids from microtransactions in games to putting stabil- THE TWO THINGS AREN’T EVEN VAGUELY COMPARABLE! You know a kid can get seriously hurt if a kid falls off a bike. Are you SURE you want to compare videogames to that? I mean, for one thing, the bike industry didn’t put the pavement down, and isn’t hiding in a bush with a stick to jam in the kid’s spokes! Because if you wanna compare videogames to falling off a bike, that’s your role in this, Game Industry. You fu– uh, stabil– (stutters incredulously) WHAT?! Rio: “The same can be said for videogame consoles comparing to–”
Jim (yells offscreen): “IT. CAAAAN’T!” Rio: “Yessssss!! Pat whose back, pat whose back?”
Jim (yells offscreen): “It explicitly can’t be said!” Rio: “Parental controls are straight-forward.” “Head to www.askaboutgames.com to find a step-by-step guide.” Rio: (sighs) “Lucky boys.” Rio: “You alright? You alright?”
Child 1: “Yeah.”
Child 2: “You get lucky every time!” Rio: “What do you mean I got lucky? You got beat.” Today’s video is dedicated to all the game industry executives out there, especially those plucky little guys sitting right at the top of the corporate structure. I’m talking about such adorable characters as Bobby Kotick, Yves Guillemot, and ha ha ha haaa of course, Android Wilson. To those hardworking cats with such thankless jobs I say SHOVE IT UP YOUR ASS! Like just shove EVERYTHING up your ass. Your companies? Shove them up your ass. Your disgusting business models? Shove them. Up your ass! This Disney Parks commemorative Mr. Potato Head mug? Right up the ass. Right into the hole of it. This right here, this latest attempt by the industry to shift responsibility for its bullshit onto other people, is shockingly transparent, even by the standards of the game industry. The (high-tone mock) “Get Smart About P.L.A.Y.” campaign is yet another bid to divert attention away from what modern videogames are doing with their vampiric economies, and place the blame for it all squarely on the shoulders of parents. (mocks) “P.L.A.Y.” has been setup by the UK Interactive Entertainment Association or (mocks) “ukie!” for short, essentially UK’s answer to the ESA, and it’s even roped in football-playing man Rio Ferdinand to help out with its pathetic and cowardly propaganda campaign. So, what is (mocks) “P.L.A.Y.”? Well it’s a fun acronym that’s fun because it’s an acronym intended to instruct parents on how to stop videogames from tricking thousands of dollars out of children. It stands for (high, mocking tone) “P – Play with your kids.” “Understand what they play and why.” “L – Learn about family controls!” (increasingly high pitch) “Visit askaboutgames.com for simple, step-by-step guides.” “A – Ask what your kids think!” “Discuss ground rules before setting restrictions.” “Y – You’re in charge.” “Set restrictions that work for your family.” [Very slowed down vocalization ending with “ha ha ha”] Life is so much more fun with acronyms, and now parents know exactly how to stop videogames preying on their kids! Congratulations, game industry! You’ve done it! You’ve saved the children! Wheeeeeeee! Buuuuuut, you know the best way to stop videogames preying on kids, don’tcha publishers? Stop making videogames that DO IT, YOU FUCKING DOLTS. Fuck having to instruct parents on protecting their kids from videogames made for kids! I mean, informing parents after the fact has become a necessity, but Jesus fucking Christ, have you ever stopped to think have ANY of you fucked up little monsters stopped to think about how fucking ludicrous it is that you’re having to warn parents about videogames literally aimed at children? I mean, didja?! For just a second, maybe, did any of you at (mocks) “ukie!” Did any of you companies benefiting from Ukie’s coverup? Did any of you wonder what it looks like when games rated for ages 3 and up need parental fucking restrictions?! That’s what the age rating system is meant to be FOR. You absolute fucking worms! But nontheless, that’s what y’all are doing. You’re informing parents that games rated for literal 3-year-olds still need parental controls to stop them from targeting and exploiting children! And it’s absolutely fucking stunning that no authorities have stopped you yet to ask why you think this is okay, or a good look, or something any right-minded individual wouldn’t question? But that’s what this entire campaign, designed to pass the buck onto parents, is hinged on! (mocking impression) “Only one in five parents of children who spend money in videogames” “use the family controls available on gaming devices.” “This is backed up by a 2019 NSPCC study” “that revealed just 19% of parents of children aged 5 to 15” “use family controls on internet-connected devices.” There’s a point we’ve made before that bares repeating; if a videogame needs adult security measures, it shouldn’t be rated as suitable for children. Simple. As. You don’t need parental locks when letting a child watch Dora the fucking Explorer. Dora’s not gonna turn round, and ask the children for a few bucks before she’ll let her chimp teach her how to count ten! Or whatever it is Dora does, I’m not familiar with her entire curriculum. But the point is, basically all entertainment rated suitable for children doesn’t need its content age-gated, because they’re rated as suitable for the fucking age of the fucking CHILDREN! The fact that content suitable for children IS suitable for children applies to pretty much every entertainment medium. Except videogames. Which, apparently, get to be the exception and are considered safe for minors despite those minors needing to be protected from the thing that’s considered safe for minors! Well it’s not parents’ fault that you’re a bunch of reckless, amoral scams artists who have been gleefully racking in cash from vulnerable people for years now and are only engaging in weak performative concern AFTER governments around the world looked into your shady microtransactions. And those governments don’t like what they see, do they? They see your randomized rewards hidden in premium lootboxes, and found them mechanically and psychologically indistinguishable from gambling. Because lootboxes, as we all know by now, ARE gambling. Just like I’ve said for half a fucking decade. And you, game publishers, have only yourselves to blame if you get in trouble for it. You pushed the envelope of acceptable monetization to see what you could get away with. You pushed and you pushed and you took it too far. Now as regulators continue to examine your down-right predatory business tactics, you put on a show of proactivity, while kicking the attention onto the parents of your PREY. Something else well worth mentioning here, is while the game industry is telling parents to get smart, the game industry is also finding ways to circumvent its own rules. Or is it circumnavigate? I always get the two mixed up, but ANYWAY. We’ve already seen with games like the recent Crash Team Racing re-release. Where they will put microtransactions in weeks after the title’s launch! AFTER rating bodies like PEGI or the ESRB have already rated it and not mentioned the in-game purchases. Now while those games do eventually get re-rated, that doesn’t stop the companies from selling them to people without those warnings for weeks! Even when they knew full-well the microtransactions were coming. Post-launch microtransactions are one way in which game publishers are able to make a mockery of the systems that are in place for their benefit! I mean, that’s why the ESRB put that in-game purchases warning on its rating system to begin with. Not because it was genuinely concerned about kids, but because it was paying lip service to the whole thing. It was saying look, we’re being proactive, we’re doing something. We warn people! It was there to cover the publishers’ backs. And the publishers STILL had to take the piss out of it. “Get Smart About P.L.A.Y.” says the industry from one corner of its mouth, and from the other, it’s doing its best to dazzle and confuse and delude its own audience! So… which is it to be? Ya fuck rags. Ooohh companies love bringing up parental controls, it’s their ultimate saving throw! Or so they think. Whenever a kid blows their family’s life savings on FIFA, and outlets like the BBC ask for comment, Electronic Arts refuses to comment. And instead refers reporters to guides on how parental restrictions work. Yet again unwittingly reinforcing the idea that we need to re-examine what games are suitable for under-aged audiences. In their minds, of course, these companies believe they’re reinforcing a different argument. The argument being that it’s on the parents to make sure FIFA isn’t swindling cash out of under-aged players using gambling mechanics. It often feels like game publishers are deliberately trying to evoke the controversies of the late 90s and 2000s. The scare mongering about violent content in videogames and whether or not children played them. Back then, the exact same defense was used. Parents should watch what their children play and make sure they don’t get their hands on such titles as Mortal Kombat, Grand Theft Auto, or Star Ocean: Till the End of Time. Most of us game pundits at the time took the side of the game industry and agreed that any parents concerned about violent content, shouldn’t let their kids play inappropriate games. But of course, the major difference back then, was that games unsuitable for minors WERE rated as unsuitable for minors. And parents can more easily understand blood and gore versus an innocently-framed football game running a con on their children. The very IDEA that a game like FIFA could bankrupt someone because they let a child play it, is a bizarre concept to any ordinary human being. In that regard, a campaign like Get Smart About P.L.A.Y. is vital. But the videogame industry is the last fucking entity that should be running it. Parents should be informed how the medium uses both positive and negative feedback loops to encourage more spending. How the medium fixes its own odds, and can patch those odds on the fly. How the medium engineers games to be less rewarding, and more grinding experiences, UNLESS microtransactions are purchased. All parents should be shown that fucking talk by Torulf Jernström. They should be shown all those stories about the thousands of dollars so-called “whales” have spent compulsively on games. They should be told everything about the business tactics of videogames and the kind of people those tactics target. Will you tell them that, Ukie? Will that be part of your (mocks) “Get Smart About P.L.A.Y.” campaign? Will Rio fucking Ferdinand tell parents about ANY of that shit which sits in the shade of your shitty little underbelly? No. Of fucking course not. Because none of the executive shitstains in charge really care about protecting people. If they did, they’d tell ’em everything. You gaggle of parasitic bastards wanna keep putting gambling in games marketed towards children. You wanna keep your unsustainable victim-based economies afloat for as long as possible. You don’t want to compromise one tiny little fucking bit, do you? You wanna face NO accountability, no responsibility, you want to just keep making that money until the bubble inevitably bursts and you won’t even take responsibility for that, will you? That’ll be on the employees underneath you. The ones who get laid off when you fuck up. Rio: “Oh my GooOOood! Ha ha!” Do any of these corporate campaigns ever actually DO anything beyond a web page? Now that I think of it, that seems to be something many industries do. They setup these alleged safety campaigns, grab a random celebrity who’s not doing anything to provide a couple quotes, and that seems to be the last we ever fucking hear of ’em. A year from now will “Get Smart About P.L.A.Y.” be touring schools, reaching out to the community, continuing its bold effort to inform parents? Or will it simply stay as this one web page that executives can direct journalists to in a craven bid to avoid answering any tough questions? I would stake my money on the latter, but gambling in this context wouldn’t be entirely tasteful. Regardless, there’s a reason why this campaign, which means less than fucking nothing, is so concerned with kids. You focus on the children because you CAN blame the parents, there’s someone responsible for them that you can pass the buck on to. That’s why “Get Smart About P.L.A.Y.” even exists. It exists to frame the discussion about lootboxes and microtransactions as a purely child-centric issue. And of course children are just one aspect. The fucking snakes of this industry, you fucking snakes. You never address the problem gamblers and compulsive shoppers you so frequently and callously target. There are no parental figures you can sweepingly implicate on that thorny issue. You don’t dare acknowledge the adults in exploitable positions whom you shamelessly exploit. The best you can do there, is try to desperately re-brand lootboxes as “surprise mechanics” and pretend none of those problems exist, instead framing the existence of predatory microtransactions as “player choice!” Without mentioning that you, and only you, you the industry, CHOSE to fill your product up to the brim with fucking poison, go get fucked. This whole campaign is a thinly-veiled case of you telling parents how to rescue their kids from YOU. Basically, you’re a wolf telling sheep how not to get eaten. And your whole campaign stinks like bad beef behind a radiator your fucking clods. I think it’s only fitting that following the unveiling of this campaign, which will go nowhere by the way, we had NHS mental health director Claire… …Murdoch, said that the game industry was setting kids up for addiction by introducing them to gambling mechanics. She said “Frankly no company should be setting kids up for addiction” “by teaching them to gamble on the content of these loot boxes.” “No firm should sell to children loot box games with this element of chance,” “so yes, those sales should end.” And more things did she say! But it’s too hot in this studio so I won’t sit here reading that because I’ve got to get out because I decided that I’ll setup a studio in Mississippi and have four lights pointed right at me, they’re like three feet away. And then I’d have on the tie, and a jacket, and a hat! And my voice got… high. -er. Higher. I don’t know, thank God for me, I’m out of ideas today. I’m done. I’ve gone.. back on my phone. This is how I live. This is literally how I live, I just stand here… …looking at my phone, dressed like this, constantly. [cell phone thunks] [Jim inhales, sighs.] [silence continues] (murmurs) Windy out… (Jim offscreen) Captions by Erin “CaHILL. Cahill. CAhill.” [[Second was right, Jim ^_~]] I keep forgetting to ask Justin to put her name in the.. ..in the credits, but… [[It’s okay! :D]] she does the subtitles that… yeah.

Why Parents Should Play Video Games With Their Kids


– We don’t really play
games with our parents. – Oh, game playing, um… – Probably, maybe once a month. – Video games, I usually am like, no. – I haven’t really played
anything since the early 90’s. – Once a week? – Mmm. – [Kid] No, Dad.
(soft playful music) No, no. – Family learning, let me think. (chuckling) Let me think. When her and some kids get together to share experiences and
explore the world together. My name is Sinem Siyahhan. I’m an Associate Professor
of Educational Technology and Learning Sciences
at Cal State San Marcos. My gaming skills are average. (mooing) Sorry.
(laughs) I just wanna make sure
that I can get some meat out of this cow. My current work is inspired
by my experience as a child. Two parents are working long hours. They didn’t have enough energy and time to play with me and my brother, and we didn’t really get
to spend time together. I try to play with my son as much as I can. I value playing games. – Oh, there. – Yes. So, for example, here, we’re exploring the farm. (pig squeals) And we’re interacting with animals, and my son is learning (baby exclaims) what sound each animal makes. What does the sheep say? (imitates bleating) (chuckling) Mah, yes. Engaging in play is important, whether it is digital or non-digital play. We invite parents and
kids to play together. We’re fortunate to have Alienware provide gaming laptops for our families. – What I find really
interesting with Play2Connect, it helps families grow these
shared values together. Hey, Sinem, how’s it goin’? – It’s going well, how are you? – I’m doin’ well, did everything show up? – Yes, we have the laptops,
they’re ready to go. I believe I am making positive impact through video games. One of the problems that I
see is video games are framed as a context of conflict
between parents and kids. What I’m trying to do is to show parents and kids that video games could be a context for togetherness, collaboration, problem solving. Hello, everyone, welcome
to our Play2Connect event. Thank you for coming, we’re
really excited to have you here. (crosstalk) – [Woman] The light one. – Oh my gosh, look, you’re
stopping the water flow. – All right, we’re gonna
have parents and kids switch. – Now you need to start
capturing the animals. – And enter space – Ah, put it in there again. I got it, I got it, I got it. – No, Dad. You build it on top of that. – All right, let’s try to plant
seeds and see what happens. – (chuckling) What is happening? – [Kid] I have a plan. – [Man] What are we gonna do? – I have to clear it myself. – We put some lights on. Some more torches? (crosstalk) – At home, I’m tutoring her, now it’s the other way around. – A few times I did big mistakes, like flooded our cornfield. – It’s not corn, wheat. – Oh, wheat, see? – Did you enjoy the challenges? – Especially the chicken farm we made. Why does it have a skeleton in it? – It’s a lot more fun than I thought. It’s really interesting
watching him at work. – There’s just more value here
than I think I had imagined, that it could be really good quality time. And I’m surprised at how
patient he was with me. – You liked me doing it, and then you were tellin’ me, “good job.” That was cool. – It’s really important
that we shift the trend around video games and families, and really start thinking
about video games in terms of their potential to contribute to our lives. (pig snorts)
(baby exclaims) Yeah, that’s a pig! Where’s the pig? (grunts excitedly)

The Most Influential Game Of The Decade (The Jimquisition)


[character shouts in fear] [“Born Depressed” by Drill Queen] Hi there, gang! It’s the year 2020! [magical twinkling sound] Yeah, it’s 2020. Hooray. It started with the promise of war, And… it’s the primer for the cosmic cook-off that is this planet’s ultimate future, so… Let’s… look back at the last decade! Mm? I don’t normally like to do retrospective things outside of the year. I try and, you know, do a retrospective of the decade within it. Although people do like to point out, smugly, that 2021 is the start of the decade because zeroes. Don’t listen to them. This is the start of the new decade. But there’s not a lot to look forward to. So we’re gonna look back a little bit more just cling on to the past and we will deal with the upcoming decade. [murmurs] What the fuck is that? Oh! Oh. It’s a camera… …plastic… mount… With the glasses on and against the carpet, it looked like a poo. [quietly] But it wasn’t. What was the most influential game of the decade known as the 2010s? Or the 10s? Or the “Taugnties”? Or the “Tensies”? Or the “Teensies”? Craig! Craig, are these fucking real? …WHAT?! Anyway, that 2010 decade has all wrapped up and if we get that World War 3 everyone’s talking about, we might not have much of a 2020s, so let’s look back on the decade that was and enjoy a little bit more retrospective. Let’s just keep looking back. Keep looking back, the past can’t hurt you, it already happened. Only the future will kill you. There’s been a lot of talk about the best games of the decade, the worst games of the decade, and the most influential games. We’ve done plenty of good and bad talk here so today, I want to look at those games that have had the most influence, that informed future game design, inspired the games developed in their wake, or otherwise had some major impact on the medium. But “influence” is a broad church it doesn’t necessarily have to mean the most popular game. It doesn’t even need to be a good game at all to have been the most influential. Is the most influential game simply the best game? The most popular game? The one that inspired many copies? The one that gained the most pop culture traction? Or is it the worst game? The one that inspired the most mockery, the one that served as a warning to other developers. I’ve seen it argued that The Witcher 3, for example, is one of the most influential games of the decade, but is that really true? The Witcher 3 is one of the past decade’s most critically-acclaimed games, that much is true. It’s a game that has been played by millions, with an active player base still going strong today even breaking concurrent player records recently, following The Witcher series on Netflix. But, was The Witcher 3 influential across the game industry? When we look around at the state of the industry since tThe Witcher 3’s 2015 release, it doesn’t look like much of its quality has been aped by the mainstream market. Where The Witcher 3 uses an open world to tell not one, but dozens of fully-written, single-player story-driven quests, its peers in the “AAA” space have used open worlds to release barely finished, threadbare “live service” games with a strong emphasis on social interactions among players. Where The Witcher 3 boasted full DLC expansions like Blood and Wine, most comparable games still rely on microtransactions, which are easier to implement and stand to make more money potentially. You know, depending on how many players they can target and hoodwink. The Witcher 3 is a great game, and rightly beloved by its large audience, but one of the reasons it stands out most today is that it didn’t see too many pretenders to its throne. In the latter half of the 2010s, most game publishers in the mainstream area were too busy hopping aboard the “live service” gravy train. In fact, it could be argued that The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim was far more influential than The Witcher 3. Hear me out! While games in a post-Witcher 3 world moved away more and more from Witcher-like experiences, Skyrim released right at the start of the 2010s when the “live service” gravy train was but a mere push-trolley, and it was followed by games trying to chomp its flavor. With good cause, too! Despite what Bethesda has become these days, Skyrim was a true game changer way back when it released in 2011. A game of that size, scale, and ambition at the time turned quite a few heads. We take it for granted now, but Skyrim at the time was remarkable for its depth and scale and sheer volume of stuff to do. And games that followed took quite a few cues from Bethesda’s work. Dragon’s Dogma, for instance, was an explicit attempt by Capcom to design a Skyrim-like game. Dragon Age: Inquisition married BioWare’s typical approach to RPG design with Bethesda’s large-scale world building. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild owes many of its shifts away from a traditional Zelda experience to the groundwork Skyrim laid down. Almost a decade on and it can be hard to realize exactly what an impact Skyrim, long since overexposed thanks to endless re-releases, made on the RPG genre and game design as a whole. To say nothing of the effect it had on media at the time. In fact, it became referenced to a ridiculous degree, as famously emphasized by Adam Kovic of Machinima when he notoriously said Far Cry 3 was “Like Skyrim with guns.” As mocked as that statement became, it provides a snapshot of an era when Skyrim was THE thing other games got measured against. But when it comes to inspiring copycats and increasingly strained comparisons, Dark Souls may have Skyrim beat. Now, Dark Souls was not the first game of what would become known as Soulsborne series following, as it did, 2009’s Demon’s Souls which was a bloody great game by the way. But! While Demon’s Souls was both an excellent game and a cult hit, it wasn’t until Dark Souls that FromSoftware’s cyclical experience and challenging, methodical gameplay went mainstream. Now Dark Souls is an incredible videogame and remains among my most-played titles today. It also did what Doom did back in the 90s and inspired a wave of follow-ups from other studios trying to get in on that hot new action. The Soulslike has become a full subgenre, and while the name may change one day the way Doom Clone did, although maybe not, we still have Metroidvanias and Roguelikes, the hallmarks a clearly defined. Games that emphasize careful combat with a need to balance stamina limits between offense and defense, checkpoints that respawn defeated enemies in exchange for healing the player, leaving something behind upon death that can be lost unless retrieved, and a general sense of tough but fair challenge. These are all part of a typical Soulslike, which range from worthy successors to weak pretenders. Lords of the Fallen, the Surge series, Nioh, Code Vein, Salt & Sanctuary, Blasphemous, Ashen, Dead Cells, Hollow Knight, they’re all either full on Soulslike or owe a significant portion of their design to FromSoftware. The series has inspired endless memes as well, and reached a point where things like “Praise the Sun” and “You Died” are known even by people who don’t play the game. And as for drawing comparisons, well it’s reached a point where “The Dark Souls of (insert genre here)” has become a thoroughly beaten horse. It has, in fact, become the… Dark Souls of comparisons… ugh forget it. Of course, it’s not just the “AAA” space that can boast influential games. One of the standouts this decade was, of course, Undertale. Toby Fox’s inventively-charming RPG played not just with its genre but with videogames as a medium, and had a lot to say about the people who play them. In the indie space, Undertale did inspire a few games to follow in its wake. Such as the incredible Pony Island. And the sheer dedication of its fanbase, the endless jokes and memes and pop culture insinuation, that can all make a case for its influential nature. Undertale certainly had enough clout to get Sans into Super Smash Bros, kinda, while AEW star Kenny Omega strolled onto TNT’s Wednesday Night Dynamite fully decked out in cosplay gear using Megalovania as his entrance theme. And Kenny, if you’re watching, can I be on your television program? Ha ha ha! Only joking, I know you’re not watching this. Now, influence is not automatically positive as we established at the beginning. Gríma Wormtongue influenced Théoden King, Jagi influenced Shin, and semi-poisonous hallucinogens influenced the Cats movie. The game industry is full of bullshit, and that bullshit doesn’t come from just anywhere. So-called “AAA” game publishers have demonstrated time and time again that if one shitty idea gains traction, they’ll copy it. Over and over and over. Many unpopular or annoying videogame practices started with a single game. For example, 2011’s LA Noire is commonly noted to be the first game boasting a season pass featuring as it did a Rockstar Pass promising new playable missions, as well as a pair of outfits and a challenge mode. Around the same time, 2011’s Mortal Kombat dabbled with the concept, because of course it did. Publisher Warner Brothers is a bag of dicks. From there, the concept of the season pass has taken off to ludicrous degrees, with most mainstream games offering some way for the audience to pay for content that literally doesn’t exist yet. Once publishers realized they could get you to pre-order DLC and most people wouldn’t question it, they realized they could get away with anything. Now even full-priced games have much of the content planned for long after purchase. And as we head into a new decade, the idea that what you buy at launch is just a taste that can be fleshed out with additional purchases has become a widespread, sadly normalized, thing. Two games from Electronic Arts can be credited as testing the waters and getting away with one of my biggest and most infamous bugbears, good ol’ microtransactions in premium priced games. Dubbed “fee to pay” by myself, $60 titles with ongoing, psychologically manipulative micropayments were dabbled with by Mass Effect 3 in 2012 and Dead Space 3 in 2013. EA experimenting in the first game and solidifying in the second. Microsoft would then normalize the concept for a new generation, with Xbox One launch titles like Ryse: Son of Rome and Crimson Dragon glomming onto microtransactions immediately to set the tone going forward. This toxic stew of greed-fueled games from EA and Microsoft took the popular model of free-to-play games and exploited it for full-priced, big-budget titles. And once they got away with it, their filth spread across the entire industry. Now microtransactions are fucking everywhere, and they’re here to stay. Thanks, EA! Thanks, Microsoft! [mutters] Ya bunch of sperm. Then there are loot boxes, oh yes. Like microtransactions, they started on mobile and are fucking everywhere now, but one game absolutely made ’em popular. That game is, of course, Overwatch. As I’ve said before, Overwatch is to loot boxes what Resident Evil is to survival horror. It didn’t originate, but it was THE perpetuator. Team Fortress 2 introduced the loot box concept to mainstream games way back in 2010, and in the time between then and Overwatch’s 2016 release, roughly ten games implemented loot boxes in some capacity. After Overwatch’s release where loot boxes proved successful, and people actually defended them at the time, over 22 games featured lootboxes in just over a year. Those who still go to bat for Blizzard like to claim FIFA was far more influential in terms of introducing gambling to games, even coining the term “Wilson Box” to describe lootboxes, so-named after EA’s robotic CEO Android Wilson. A term contrived to create an intrinsic link between lootboxes and Electronic Arts, instead of Activision Blizzard. But all signs point to Overwatch as the game that truly inspired publishers to push that poison onto the general public. But if Overwatch made them normal and a cool thing to do in the game industry, it can be argued that Star Wars Battlefront II, a grossly erroneous overstep from EA, had a grand part to play in damaging their credibility. After using loot boxes to bring pay-to-win mechanics to Star Wars, the fan backlash was massive to the point where legislators got involved, and more serious talks were had about the socioeconomic impact of videogame monetization. EA chose to be amazingly avaricious even by its own standards and absolutely chose the wrong game to do it with. A Star Wars game! A game even non-gaming reporters at mainstream outlets could understand because Star Wars. So of course they fucking reported on it! And now we have gambling commissions across the world looking at lootboxes and saying “You know what?” “That looks an awful lot like gambling.” While loot boxes are still popular, especially in the mobile market’s underbelly, they became untenable for all but the most shameless of companies. Between them, Overwatch and Star Wars Battlefront II had major influence on the decade’s most controversial money-making tactic. And then there’s Fortnite. You see, while we can sit here and talk about the games most familiar and popular titles among long-term game players, we cannot understate the sheer mass appeal of Epic Games’ Fortnite, which is so mainstream it makes what I call a mainstream game look positive niche. I mean, they unveiled content for The Rise of Skywalker in Fortnite! Content that should have, y’know, BEEN in Rise of the Skywalker but instead was sectioned off for a shameless publicity stunt. What a fucking mess of a film. What a fucking m- and I don’t need your hot takes, by the way, about how it’s actually good. I realize we’re in the backlash to the backlash phase, the back-backlash now to Rise of the Skywalker reactions. But it’s st- uh, ugh. It’s a bad film. Anyway, Fortnite has turned dance moves into real-life fads, especially the ones it stole. Practically fucking everybody knows what Fortnite is, millions have played it from those deeply into videogames to the lightest casual player, and it makes more than enough money per day to make the average person violently sick. As well as that, it popularized the battle pass which looks set to be the hot new thing and may lead to in-game premium subscriptions as seen with Fallout 76’s Fallout 1st debacle. [yells aside] A hundred dollars a year subscription for Fallout 76?! [yells aside] Fucking what?! Licky licky WHAT?! Fortnite’s crossed over with The Avengers, Batman, Stranger Things, the fucking NFL. It will have crossed over with fucking Some Mothers Do ‘Ave ‘Em by the time this sentence is finished! And the Battle Royale genre absolutely exploded thanks to it. PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds may have had the first taste of mass appeal in the genre, and mods in open worlds games like DayZ and Rust may have originated it, but Fortnite blew everything out of the water and inspired dozens upon dozens of knockoffs, as well as battle royale modes in series like Call of Duty and Fallout. But if you roll your hipster eyes at Fortnite being called the most influential game of the 2010s, you’ll pull them out your fucking head when I say, with some confidence, what the most influential game actually was. And that game is… Clash of Clans. When we get down to the wire, whether we talk about critically-acclaimed games like The Witcher 3, inspirational, genre-creators like Dark Souls, or mass market smashes like Fortnite, there’s no getting away from the fact that a freemium strategy game on mobile was more than likely the most influential thing over the course of this decade following its 2012 release. I know for a bloody fact it’s hugely influential because, as I’ve noted in past videos, Clash of Clans has consistently been one of three games that industry executives reference. In fact, to some executives, the ones that come from other industries outside of games, Clash of Clans is one of only three games that they even acknowledge exists, alongside Call of Duty and Candy Crush. These three games are the unholy trinity of greed-fueled publishers. A trinity I’ve handily abbreviated to C-C-COD-COC. In its own market, Clash of Clans inspired hundreds of mobile strategy games that aped not just its gameplay but its art style. Look at all these icons! Outside of that market, the sheer wealth its microtransactions accumulated did not go unseen by “AAA” publishers, hungry for some of that sweet Do Re Mi. One of the reasons given by Visceral Games for Dead Space 3’s fee-to-pay bullshit was the popularity of freemium models on mobile, and Clash of Clans has been THE gold standard for most of the decade. In 2015 the game was raking in 1.5 million dollars a day. By 2018 it had generated more revenue than any other mobile app, ever. Its freemium model was copied by big budget publishers who saw no reason to actually make their games free. Its success has spawned legions of knock-offs. Like Fortnite, almost everyone knows what it is. Maybe Fortnite would have exerted more influential if it’d released earlier in the 2010s, but over the course of the past ten years, Clash of Clans has exerted more influence over the people pulling the levers of the game industry, and that’s the sad fact. No matter what brilliant games you like. No matter their quality, their cultural traction, their fandom or their respect, none of them were as important in shaping this generation as Clash of fucking Clans. So enjoy thinking about that. Oh yeah Minecraft’s come out this decade and all. …that was pretty popular. Eagle-eyed viewers may have spotted that there wasn’t really any mention of Nintendo and no, it’s not because I’m biased. It’s a similar reason to The Witcher 3, really. But more so, because Nintendo tends to exist in its own little bubble doing its own little thing. And I feel that’s been consistent of them for the past two decades, really. They get on with their own thing. I mean, last generation they inspired a lot of motion control stuff. But it didn’t really take off. So even then, they influenced the fad, but maybe not the whole decade. But that was the decade before the one we’re even looking at, so… Don’t even get me off-topic ya cheeky goose. [mutters] I don’t know what I meant by that. Um… But all things considered, one thing I can say in Nintendo’s favor and you can take this to the bank, is the Switch was easily my favorite system this past decade. Easy. Maybe one of my, well, ONE of my favorite systems ever. Possibly my favorite one. We would- well you know, I’d have to test it in a lab, to fully commit to it, but yeah, of the decade? Easy, bang-up job. Love the Switch. Can play Resident Evil 4 on it. You know, what other system could do that? Thank God for me. [“Stress” by Jim’s Big Ego]