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The Only Zelda Game Without A Hero

October 20, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 100 Comments

The Only Zelda Game Without A Hero


Ever since playing it for the first time nearly
20 years ago, I’ve been trying to come to terms with the ending of Link’s Awakening. There are a lot of things about this title
that make it a unique entry to the Zelda series, but, to me at least, the biggest is that it’s
the only Zelda game where Link doesn’t really feel like a hero. By and large the inhabitants of Koholint island
seem happy. Sometimes the residents fall victim to raids
from moblins or curses from the lost woods, but there isn’t a clear impending danger
that threatens their way of life. They don’t really need saving. A wizard doesn’t usurp the throne, the moon
isn’t about to crash into the village, a princess, friend, or sister has not been kidnapped. The conflict is that Link needs to get off
of the island and the only way to do so is by waking the Wind Fish, so that is what he
sets off to do. In Awakening, Link is trying to save himself. It is his way of life that is in jeopardy. This is a pretty interesting departure from
the typical Zelda formula. Any help he does give those on the island
is secondary and really just a means to an end. At first, at least. Really, it is the inhabitants of the island
who help Link more than the other way around. Without them, he would never be able to leave. This setup in and of itself is intriguing
because the frame is so different than any of the games that came before or after it. But it manages to push things even further
as it goes. What begins as a simple enough story about
getting off of an island in the middle of nowhere becomes a lot more complicated once
the truth of the Wind Fish’s nature is revealed.. Through warnings from the various bosses he
defeats and the information shown on the mural in the ancient ruins, Link learns that the
island is just a dream of the Wind Fish, and awakening it will end that dream. For Link to return to his way of life, he
needs to sacrifice the way of life for every character he’s met—for all of those people
who have helped in some way, big or small. In Link’s Awakening, Link is the threat. And this is where stuff gets a little muddy. The game asks the question: are lives that
come from dreams as valuable as ones that don’t? While in a real world context, the obvious
answer would be no, they’re not, it is far more complex in Link’s Awakening. The Wind Fish’s dream is not a normal one. Real dreams are fluid, shifting from one scene
to the next with little rhyme or reason. If this were a normal dream, Marin would turn
into Link’s math professor halfway through the game and tell him that he missed his final
exam. And, yes, I’ve been out of school for years
now, and I still get this kind of nightmare. It never ends. In the Wind Fish’s dream though, everything
stays consistent. There are certainly oddities, but things mostly
make sense and feel like life. At least, like life in a video game. The specifics of how the dream works are never
solidified, but it is clearly more real than the dreams of a typical person. The mere fact that, Link, an outside force,
is able to enter the dream and interact with it, shows there is deeper magic to it all. The Wind Fish almost seems to be a deity. He has the power to create worlds and people
that feel real. Of the first four Zelda games, the cast of
Awakening is more distinct and memorable than those of any of the other titles, and even
Link’s relationship with Marin is stronger than the one he shares with Zelda. A Link To The Past ushered in characters with
more depth, but Awakening took things a step further and focused even more on Link building
relationships with them. Marin is really the first character in the
series to have this level of depth. She is not only lovable and endearing, but
she has dreams of her own—dreams of getting off the island and singing for everyone in
the world. This is a trend that the series has built
upon and expanded greatly because it makes players feel far more connected to the people
and the world they are trying to save. In Awakening one of Link’s quests involves
meeting the various inhabitants of the island and trading items with them in order to progress,
giving Link and the player the chance to meet with the interesting cast of characters. There is also a section where Link and Marin
travel together, and if the player decides to explore the island with her, they are rewarded
with a handful of charming moments between the two, solidifying their relationship. By structuring the game in this way, it gets
players to better understand what will be lost if they continue. These aren’t just characters in the background,
they are ones that Link and the player have gotten to know. This chips away at the notion that the player
is doing the right thing. Link’s motivation to leave is not the only
thing driving the story forward. Although it isn’t clear until the end, the
Wind Fish is actively trying to be awoken. The Owl who constantly stops by to ask Link
if he would kindly wake the Wind Fish, is acting on the orders of the Wind Fish. What’s even more interesting is that he
does so by deceiving Link. It is hard to know where the Owl begins and
the Wind Fish ends, so it is impossible to say whether or not the Owl knew everything
about the nature of the dream. However, given that he doesn’t mention the
existence of nightmares within the dream until after Link defeats them, along with saying
he is the guardian of the dream world, it isn’t a massive leap to assume that he probably
knew what would happen. So, when the Owl tells Link that, yes, it
is a dream, but no one knows whether or not the island will disappear this seems like
a lie told to convince Link to keep going. Link spends a lot of time becoming a part
of the island, and if he knew for sure that waking the Wind Fish would cause everything
to disappear, to cause Marin to disappear, he might not want to wake the Wind Fish. He might rather stay. Of course, the player can technically choose
to do this by just turning off the game before beating the final boss, but that isn’t really
satisfying because it doesn’t lead to an actual resolution they get to see. For the game to truly end, Link needs to awaken
the Wind Fish and let Koholint Island vanish. Certainly there is a moral argument that the
Wind Fish’s life is more valuable than the lives of those within the dream, but regardless
of that, the Wind Fish is not the one Link spends time with throughout the adventure. The Wind Fish is not the one whose wishes
Link hears. The Wind Fish is not the one players care
about. So whether or not it is the right thing to
do, it’s upsetting. For the longest time though, I felt that I
must be missing something, that I must not have understood the story entirely, and this
disconnect stems from the final cutscene. Link, stranded in the middle of the ocean,
looks up to see the Wind Fish flying overhead and he smiles, as a triumphant rendition of
the Ballad of the Wind Fish plays. Link’s reaction in those final moments differed
so greatly from mine when I first saw, and I always questioned why the developers chose
to end the game on that note. It could be as simple as him feeling relieved
that the Wind Fish may be able to save him from his current predicament of floating in
the middle of the ocean; it could be him being happy to know that the dream of Koholint Island
wasn’t his own but rather one shared with someone else, making everything from the dream
live on through the Wind Fish; it could be him accepting that all things end, and the
only thing one can really do is remember the past with love and move forward. It could be a lot of things. It could also be nothing. Link’s Awakening is one of those games that
I have played during various stages of my life and gotten something new from it each
time. When I was 8, I thought it was sad that Link
had to leave his friends—that no matter what, he’d only ever be left with the memory
of them. Today though, I see Link as someone who needed
to make a nearly impossible choice where no matter what, other people, people who didn’t
deserve it, would lose, and even though the choice benefits him in some ways, it hurts
him in a thousand others. Every time I’ve finished Link’s Awakening,
I’ve left feeling a little empty. Like, despite trying my best I only ended
up making things worse. And personally, that is what I love about
Awakening. I adore games that have the ability to elicit
this kind of an emotional response. In general, Zelda games do a good job of creating
stories that resonate with players, and it has long been one that explores meaningful
themes that extend far beyond the games themselves. Majora’s Mask explores grief and legacy,
Ocarina of Time looks at innocence and the loss of it, Breath of the Wild tackles failure
and acceptance. Nearly every Zelda game has a core theme it
examines, and the way that theme is typically addressed involves Link conquering his obstacles
and becoming a hero who saves the day. Awakening does things a little differently
though. Link’s problems aren’t solved by simply
turning into a hero. It asks more from players than that. It asks them to make a choice with greater
complexity than right versus wrong; it asks them to learn to leave things behind; it asks
them to sometimes be the bad guy; in a weird way that wasn’t clear to me until I became
one myself, it asks them to be an adult. And sometimes that means accepting that everything
ends and still being able to look up, and smile at the dreams of days past. Ey. Thank you for watching. Since the last video, the channel has grown
beyond any reasonable expectation, and I just wanted to say thank you. After 6 years of doing this YouTube thing,
it means the world to have people still wanting to watch. I look forward to sharing more things with
you all. If you have the means and want to further
support the channel, consider supporting me on Patreon. For just 2 dollars, you can get videos a day
early and have access to behind the scenes content, like a monthly Q+A podcast. Supporting the patreon will help ensure more
consistent uploads and allow for more ambitious projects in the future. If you’d like more information, all of the
details are on my page on patreon. Anyway, thank you again for supporting the
channel, and I hope you have a great day and/or night, and I will see you in the next one.

Top 10 BROKEN Fighting Game Characters

October 20, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 100 Comments

Top 10 BROKEN Fighting Game Characters


Nick: If you’ve been following Screwattack for a while, you know how much we love fighting games. For us, they bring us so much hype and excitement, but then there are some characters that just bring us nothing but salt and frustration. The 10 you see here aren’t necessarily unbeatable, but man, oh man, they can be rage inducing. So hey! I’m Nervous Nick for Screwattack’s Top 10 BROKEN fighting game characters. Announcer: NUMBER 10. Nick: Killer Instinct has never been a super execution heavy series, but even then, why is Cinder such an easy character to play in the original KI!? Not just easy, but rewarding too! Not only does he have one of the most famous infinite combos in fighting games, but he’s got another combo that ends up stunning you, letting him rinse and repeat until you lose. Oh, also, he can turn invisible. You know, just for good measure. Cinder was such a problem in the arcades back in the day, that Nintendo actually had to patch KI just to take away his infinite nonsense. Yes, behind the times Nintendo PATCHED A GAME IN 1994 by sending technicians out to all 17,000 arcade machines… …just to tone Cinder down. I love it. A man on fire did more to modernize Nintendo than competition from Sony and Microsoft ever did! Announcer: NUMBER 9. Nick: Love her or hate her, Ibuki will forever be one of my very favorite Street Fighter characters. Back in Street Fighter 3: New Generation, she was the first fighting game character I ever mained. But I’ll call it like I see it, this character’s broken. I can’t think of too many characters who have ever had a one button infinite. but here’s Ibuki comboing Elena with nothing but a standing heavy kick. Even I could do this infinite back in the day, and I was a complete fighting game newbie! Plus, her super, “Hashin Shou” was just dumb! I remember one time, I got hit by Ryu’s fireball and somehow mashed out a super fast enough to hit Ryu with it before he even had a chance to block! Oh, also this super sets up Ibuki’s infinite as well. If ever a case could be made for thick thighs taking lives… …this would be it. Announcer: NUMBER 8. Nick: When Street Fighter Cross Tekken was announced, it was like a childhood dream come true. I mean, two huge fighting game franchises coming together in an official game?! The possibilities were endless! Unfortunately, the game launched as a buggy glitch-filled disappointment and nothing embodies that better than “Mega Man”. Mega Man with GIANT quotation marks around it. Anyway, Mega Man could eke out wins with the tactic not so affectionately referred to as a TIMER SCAM. Basically all he had to do was get the life lead and trigger a bug which took him to frigging orbit, out of your reach, you can never hit him again for the rest of the game. After that it was only a matter of waiting for the timer to run out, or for the opponent to rage quit. But hey, on the plus side, Capcom has since managed to fix both this bug and Mega Man himself. Thank God! Announcer: NUMBER 7. December 15, 2015… …the final character for Smash Brothers Wii U is revealed to be none other than Bayonetta. The internet loses its collective mind with hype! …And today, the internet is losing its collective mind with SALT. Anybody who’s had to face Bayonetta knows the pain of losing an entire stock just because she got you with one Witch Time counter. This move is fricking dumb! Even without it, Bayonetta still has plenty of other ways to take you from 0% ALL the way to the Big Battlefield in the sky by killing you off the top. Pretty much the only reason Bayonetta’s not higher is because she did get patched so that you can escape her zero to death combos, but you’ve got to do this to your controller to do it! [BOOM] The only thing that wears down faster than your control stick is your patience when you’ve got to fight the Umbra Witch. Cross your fingers that if and when this game gets a Switch-port that Nintendo burns the witch one more time. Announcer: NUMBER 6. Nick: One word: RESURRECTION. Anybody who has had the misfortune of playing against Gill from Street Fighter 3 probably shudders at that very word. It wasn’t enough that this game’s boss character does chip-damage with his normals… shoots projectiles that can eat through everyone else’s… can stun most characters in one combo and also hits like a titanium truck carrying bricks! What truly puts Gill over the edge is everything he does with his Super Meter. You can use it to rain down a wall of projectiles from the sky… shoot rainbows that do a billion damage whether you block it or not… or worst of all, his dreaded RESURRECTION. Let me tell you the story of how this usually goes: You barely managed to land the final hit that downs this giant naked man… when suddenly he just gets back up like he’s demon-possessed and his health bar turns green again! I’ll skip to the end of the story: You lose! Hey, at least he’s banded by default in 3rd Strike: Online Edition! Announcer: NUMBER 5. Nick: How can you talk about broken fighting game characters without bringing up the all-time classic Akuma from Super Street Fighter 2: Turbo? You want to know what an overpowered fighter looks like? Behold! The quintessential textbook example! We all remember experiencing the nightmare that was the hidden boss Akuma… so when it turned out that the version YOU could play as was toned down, everybody said: “Oh, thank God!” But, he was STILL too powerful. Akuma was always meant to be something of a glass cannon, who hits hard but gets it even harder. The thing is, in his first appearance here, he was a too much cannon and not enough glass. If he kept throwing his red fireballs at you… YOU WERE STUCK-AND-BLOCK FOR THE REST OF THE MATCH, and even if you got past that, he couldn’t be stunned! At least Gill was banned by default in Street Fighter 3! Not so with Akuma. Announcer: NUMBER 4. Nick: Something that makes Marvel vs Capcom games so appealing is the idea that EVERYONE is cheap. That’s such a huge reason why these games are so fun! And yet, for most people, Dark Phoenix managed to suck the fun right out of Marvel vs Capcom 3. Phoenix may have the smallest amount of health in the game, but if she dies while sitting on all 5 Hyper-Meters HO HO, BOY, ARE YOU IN FOR SOME BULLCRAP! Reborn as Dark Phoenix her speed and damage output both get a huge boost, and since her teleport can appear in front or behind you, you basically have to guess which way to block. And then, on top of all that, if she triggers her X-Factor… she gets even faster and even stronger until she’s an nigh-unreactable powerhouse that can undo all your hard work in just a few combos. I haven’t played this game since 2013 and even though I was never really good at it… this character is still a big reason why I quit. Announcer: NUMBER 3. Bayonetta may be the modern-day controversial Smash character, but not so long ago, that dishonor belonged to Meta knight in Super Smash Brothers Brawl. This beach ball with wings seemingly has almost every advantage going for him! Ridiculously fast moves both on the ground and in the air, a powerful combo game, and for those of you into this sort of thing… NO BAD MATCHUPS ACROSS THE ENTIRE CAST! He may be a lightweight, but if your attack does anything less than kill him outright, Meta Knight is practically GUARANTEED to get back onto the stage again, since every single one of his special moves also works as a recovery. Plus, Meta knight is really good at running away from you the entire match. Remember that glitch that let him disappear for as long as he felt like? Yeah, not so fun for everybody else. Fun fact: Because Meta Knight is such a stupidly powerful character… he’s the only one in all of Smash who is nearly banned from all tournament play. And in hindsight, he probably should have been… Announcer: NUMBER 2. Nick: You know a fighter is bonkers if they’re banned from tournaments WITHOUT being a boss character, and if you played Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Heritage for the Future, you can see why this exact thing happened to a little bird called Pet Shop. This freaky falcon is small, hard to hit, and loves nothing more than shooting you with a giant icicles that lead to TONS of damage. Pet Shop is so hard to keep track of because he’s all over the screen in this game… and he’s so strong, that he can even take Jojo himself from full health all the way to death in a single combo. GOLLY-MIT! I JUST- I JUST WANT TO SMASH HIS LITTLE BIRD FACE IN PIECES UNTIL IT SHATTERS! Oh yeah, just like that. Announcer: IT’S… NUMBER 1. Nick: If you’re watching a Screwattack Top 10 you must understand that if it’s number one on the list IT IS THE ANSWER. Ladies and gentlemen, let me personally introduce you to the number one most broken fighting game character of all. Ivan Ooze. In Power Rangers Fighting Edition on SNES, this character actually flies around the arena the entire game all the while shooting you with columns of lasers and projectiles that, get this, HOME IN ON YOU. Even if you somehow get in close on him, Ivan Ooze’s aptly-named invulnerable strike has, well, obvious advantages. It’s true that he literally can’t block, but with moves like these, WHY WOULD HE NEED TO?!?!?!? On top of all that, what if I told you that you can’t throw him OR hit him with low attacks!? That means half of your basic offense is COMEPLETELY WORTHLESS against him! Picking the best character in a fighting game doesn’t usually mean that you’re going to win automatically… Unless you pick Ivan Ooze in which case you will win every time. For secret number 11 we’re going back to Smash one more time for the Ice Climbers. These kids trolled their way through not just Melee, but also Brawl as well! If your opponent knew the right inputs, one grab from the Ice Climbers meant one death for you guaranteed. So maybe it’s for the best that they never made their return in Smash Brothers Wii U

NET Productions| Nebraska The Chocolate Life

October 19, 2019 | Articles, Blog | No Comments

NET Productions| Nebraska The Chocolate Life


(mellow orchestral music) CHRISTOPHER: Chocolate
is fascinating, fun. Chocolate is romantic. SUSIE: Chocolate
is a warm hug. KEVIN: Messy. (laughing) PAUL: Well said. DEB: Chocolate
is mouth watering, satisfying, extravagant,
lavish, beautiful. BERTHA: Super delicious.
(laughing) CHRISTOPHER: The journey
from the discovery of cacao to present day to a
chocolate bar is a long, fascinating piece of history. TODD: We’ve had lines
blow up on us to where you’re literally covered from
head to toe in chocolate. Always worse things
you can be covered in, we always say. MELISSA: A lot of people
are surprised to find out that everything on there
is completely edible. We also get a lot of people
that are surprised to find out that everything’s done by hand. SHINYA: Everybody said,
“Wow, this is different.” Somebody said that this is
life-changing chocolate. BERTHA: It’s hard to find
anything that you really feel like you have
accomplished something and making the
chocolates I feel like I’ve accomplished something. JASMIN: People don’t
realize what amazing things are coming out of this
part of the country and going all over
the United States. (mellow orchestral music) NARRATOR: When Nebraskans
think of chocolate today, Bakers Candies in Greenwood
often comes to mind. The plant started by
Kevin Baker in 1986 as a way to provide
for his family, is now a family run operation. KEVIN BAKER: There’s a
lot of things I wanna go in other than candy but I
had a family to support and I knew if we could do
this and do it right, we could get it going
pretty soon and we did. NARRATOR: Before
starting Bakers Candies Kevin built, designed and
maintained automated equipment in the aerospace industry. His start in candy
came when he was hired by Lincoln chocolate
company House of Bauer. KEVIN: I was hired to come
in and update equipment, try to automate it, get them
efficient and make some money. We got it going
good and so I think it started showing a profit so basically they sold
out to Price Candy out of Richmond, Missouri
which was later bought by a bunch of investors
and they bankrupted it. NARRATOR: Not to be deterred, Kevin took his ideas he’d been
developing for House of Bauer and built the first
Bakers candy building with help from family
and never looked back. KEVIN: I was not a candy man but I knew how to make candy. I mean I would, I didn’t know the recipes but
I knew what needed to be done that we could make
it efficiently. We hired a guy that knew
more about chocolate and he would work the recipes
and we would run tests and try things to see
how fast we could run it. Get the chocolate to set, is it compatible
with our equipment. NARRATOR: Today
Kevin’s sons Todd and Paul have integral rolls in the
company’s day-to-day operations. TODD BAKER: There are
photographs of Paul and I on our David Hasselhoff
Knight Rider Big Wheels rolling around the Bauer
and Blum plant in Lincoln and so the chocolate
industry is really all we’ve ever known. We’re pretty good at making
chocolate having spent our whole lives doing this. NARRATOR: The Bakers
estimate they produced between three and four
hundred thousand pounds of chocolate in 2017. That results in at least
30 million meltaways. TODD: By my math that amounts to about 12-15 meltaways
per Nebraskan. NARRATOR: According to Paul, milk chocolate red
is the fan favorite followed closely by
dark chocolate mint, but which one do the
Bakers like best? PAUL BAKER:
They all taste like work is
our famous saying around here. NARRATOR: Like Nebraska
farmers sell corn and soybeans the Bakers buy their chocolate
on the open commodity market. TODD: The cocoa beans come to
the United States on a ship, just like every chocolate
company gets their cocoa beans however, we have them
processed into these nice, convenient melting ingots. A pallet like this
of chocolate liquor actually is probably
about the equivalent of an entire semi trailer full
of dry roasted cocoa beans. Being far more dense
we’re able to get about 30 of these pallets onto a semi truck and we
can get a lot more cocoa here to Nebraska so that
we can re-distribute it. NARRATOR: After 10 pound
chocolate liquor blocks are melted, they are mixed with
cocoa butter and flavorings to begin the process of creating the famous Bakers Meltaway. TODD: From the beginning to
the end the entire process takes about 90 minutes. That includes the time it
took to literally pump it out onto the floor, form, shape,
coat, cool, twist wrap and send it into this catch
bucket like you see right here. NARRATOR: Let’s speed
that 90 minute process up a bit, shall we? (upbeat bubble gum music) (record scratching) Okay, now let’s try it slow. (smooth mellow music) Bakers chocolates are so good
people come from miles around. Some even pedal their way. An annual chocolate
bike ride by the Great Plains Bicycling
Club brings chocoholics 40 miles round trip to satisfy
their chocolate cravings. RANDY SMITH:
We do the Bob Brown Memorial
Easter Bunny Chocolate Ride. This is a memorial for Bob,
who along with his wife Ann were long-time
members of the club. Bob was a real chocolate
lover so about weekly during the summer they would
ride out from their home, up here to highway six
and up to Greenwood to Bakers Chocolates
where Bob would replenish the supplies and
they would ride back. Bob passed away suddenly
a few years back and I decided we needed
to continue the ride so I’ve led that ride
for the last few years. NARRATOR: To accommodate
chocolate lovers from across Nebraska,
Bakers is expanding. A 5000 square foot
retail store addition is slated to open in 2019. A testament to their efficiency. TODD: A chocolate factory
our size in the year 1980 would have had have employed
at least a hundred people to do what we’re now able to
do on our production floor with just three employees. Literally machinery does 100%
of the labor intensive work out here on the candy factory
floor and so when people come to the chocolate factory
looking for oompa loompas they’re often
disappointed to find they’ve all been outsourced by automated
production equipment. NARRATOR: In fact,
automation may have lead to the demise of Lincoln’s
second largest employer of the 1950’s and ’60’s. Let’s take a look at the
Haymarket when cranking out hand-dipped confections
was a top priority. ED ZIMMER: We’re at 8th and P in
Haymarket in Lincoln, Nebraska and I think of this as the
center of chocolate in Lincoln and maybe the center of
chocolate in all of Nebraska because behind me is
the candy factory. What originally was the Gillen
and Boney candy company. They were a Lincoln firm that
went all the way back to 1895 and in fact, they went back
to 1895 in this building, although it didn’t look
like this at that time. NARRATOR: Ed Zimmer is
Lincoln’s leading historian. He takes us through what today
is a revitalized urban area and what once was
Lincoln’s chocolate mecca. Frank Gillen and
William Boney worked for competing candy companies. Gillen for Lash Brothers, Boney for Lincoln
Confectionary Company. After about a year as
competitors they joined forces. ED: Almost immediately
after Gillen and Boney formed their own company, their
building burned down in 1895 and somehow they didn’t
go out of business, they in fact bought the
two-thirds of the site that had burned down and rebuilt
their three stories in 1906 then added fourth story on top
of that and eventually bought and remodeled the
whole exterior. So, that whole
corner of 8th and P was the Gillen and
Boney building. NARRATOR: The foundation
laid by Gillen and Boney turned into Russell Stover, Lincoln’s leading chocolate
company in history. ED: Stover’s first came to
Lincoln not as manufacturers but as retailers. They weren’t called
Russell Stover, they were called Mrs.
Stover’s Bungalow Candies and they were in several
locations around 13th and O, eventually operating out of the Miller and Paine
department store building. During World War II, in order
not to be put out of business by the rationing, they bought
regional candy companies and Gillen and Boney was
one of them they bought. (upbeat jazz music) NARRATOR: By 1943 when Russell
Stover took over operations of Gillen’s Candies,
they have 43 locations around the region. Not long after that,
in the spring of 1946, an 18 year old named
Margaret began working there. MARGARET LEHL: I think I weighed
114 pounds when I started there and boy it didn’t take
long to pick-up to at least 118 or so (chuckling) and I’ve been heavy ever since. If I took that first
piece in the morning, I ate it all day long. But if I never ate a
piece then I was okay. NARRATOR: Not long after
she started working there Margaret met a teenage
candy maker named Leonard. In October of 1947, when
she was 19 and he was 20, they got married. Both Margaret and Leonard made
a career out of Russell Stover working there until 1980 when
offices and major production moved to Kansas City. But before that
happened, Russell Stover was the major player in Lincoln. ED: The payroll
eventually reached 800
and they were producing a million pounds
of candy a month out of the Haymarket district. MARGARET: I started
out as a service girl for the nut cluster dippers
and I did that for a while and then I learned to dip
the clusters too, myself. And then from there I
learned to do the designs by hand dipping and I did
chocolate and pastel both. NARRATOR: As a perfectionist
Margaret had a hard time meeting the 120-150 tray quota
during her eight hour shifts. With 82 pieces of
candy on a tray, workers would have each
dipped over 10 thousand pieces of candy each shift. MARGARET:
If you was going to make
for vanilla cream that was a V and you used three
fingers and made the V. And chocolate butter
was rough top so you, it was kind of a rough top. And then for caramels
it was a cup. ED: I still run into people
around Lincoln who worked at, what they almost always
called Stover’s and they have fond memories of coming
home smelling of chocolate. MARGARET: Didn’t pay a lot but I
stayed because I liked to dip and I liked the people and so I, I just enjoyed working there. NARRATOR: The
Lehl’s started their family
while working at Stover’s. The kids remember their parents
coming home with chocolate for them on a regular basis. MARGARET: It was like a
three pound box. We only paid a dollar
for the seconds. NARRATOR: Today inside
the candy factory atrium a tree grows from one of
the vats that was used to melt the chocolate
all those years ago. And train tracks still
disappear into the building. ED: As Russell Stover
expanded in Lincoln they went beyond the
Gillen and Boney building into about half a dozen
buildings around them including the big HP Lau
grocery warehouse north of them. From the north the spur line
came right into the HP Lau building and all the
way down into the old Gillen and Boney building so
they could deliveries by rail right inside the building. NARRATOR: Former
Russell Stover employees still get together twice a
year for coffee and breakfast. MARGARET: We talk some about it
and how things changed, some of the people that are
gone that we really miss and everything. It’s just fun to get together. NARRATOR: Today in Texas,
Frank Gillen’s great grandson still makes chocolate under
the Gillen candy brand. In Lincoln in 2013
with the construction of the Pinnacle Bank
Arena came a piece of art by Philadelphia
artist Donald Lypsky called Box of Chocolates. It is 16 feet wide by nine
feet high and contains 144 chocolate pieces. The artwork pay homage to the
area’s rich chocolate history. TODD: I’m Todd Baker with Bakers
Candies and shipping chocolate especially in Nebraska,
particularly in the summer can be quite difficult. If you’re going to ship
chocolate from home, here’s what you need to do. First, start with any
standard corrugated box. If you can, put insulation
first at the bottom, followed by the candy,
our local sports page. We use eutectic gel
packs like these. You can no longer ship dry ice
via most commercial channels and so you eutectic
gel ice is great for two to three-day shipping. Place it on top
of your newspaper, then from there we’re
going to add one more layer of insulation to the top of the
box and then here’s the key, when we close the box we
wanna tape it not simply along its vertical seam but also along each of the
horizontal seams as well. What we’re hoping to do is
make this package air tight. By doing this, your chocolate
will last about 40% longer and it’s the key
that everybody misses when they ship
chocolate from home. NARRATOR: Lincoln’s
Haymarket will forever be connected to the
city’s chocolate past. Today it’s still an area
where chocolate lovers can find something satisfying. ED ZIMMER: At their peak Russell
Stover was using about half a dozen buildings
in Haymarket, both on the candy factory block
and even across the street here at what’s now The Mill. This was one of the key
buildings in the revitalization of the area. I hear they even sell
chocolate inside here now. NARRATOR: Some of the
chocolate sold inside the mill is made by Shinya Takahashi, a nutrition and health
science professor by day and chocolate maker by night. His chocolate is
known as Nama Choco. SHINYA TAKAHASHI: I don’t
advertise my side business, chocolate business
to my students or
anybody else on campus because on one hand I’m
advocating or teaching students a healthy lifestyle but
then I make chocolate to sell to people. Once in a while when I go to
The Mill coffee shop in town, there are students
there studying for exams and I see them, “Oh,
you’re the professor.” Oh yes, (chuckles) and
it’s a little bit awkward situation sometimes. (speaking in Japanese language) NARRATOR: Shinya moved
from Japan to Nebraska to study exercise
science after watching the Nebraska football
team play Kansas State in Tokyo in 1992. SHINYA: What I saw on TV,
Nebraska playing against K-State and they were really strong. Tommie Frazier was a freshman
and he was a quarterback and they beat K-State so I
was pretty impressed by that and I decided to
come to Nebraska. NARRATOR: Shinya began
making his Japanese chocolates as a way to bring a taste of
home to his family and friends in Nebraska. SHINYA: The chocolate that I
make is really popular in Japan, especially the
Valentine’s Day time. Maybe January through
March but I haven’t seen anything like that in US and so I started to
kind of experiment and try to find
a close chocolate that I’m used to. NARRATOR: He turned it
into a business in 2014 after winning the
People’s Choice award at Lincoln’s Chocolate
Lover’s Fantasy event. That was the first time he
entered and he’s held the title every year since. SHINYA: When we went to
Chocolate Lover’s Fantasy
first time, we provided samples and
everybody said “Wow, “this is different.” Somebody said, “this is
life changing chocolate.” NARRATOR: His recipes
are simple in appearance and ingredients. Shinya prefers to let the
chocolates speak for themselves. SHINYA: I’m not making
chocolate from scratch, I’m using baking chips
basically, chocolate chips and then I put in some
ingredients and make the texture much, much soft and smooth and
I think that’s the difference when you compare to
other chocolates. NARRATOR: Nama Choco
comes in five flavors: dark chocolate, sea salt,
mint, sea salted caramel and raspberry. SHINYA:
My chocolate is temperature
sensitive so my chocolate needs to be always in the
refrigerator and it can last, I’m really comfortable
maybe at seven to 10 days but beyond that I won’t
be able to guarantee that that chocolate is good. All right. MOTHER-IN-LAW: Kanpai
SHINYA: Kanpai. NARRATOR: Shinya
makes Nama Choco in his mother-in-law’s basement
kitchen because that meets the proper certifications
for a food processor license. SHINYA: Nama meaning
“the fresh”, in Japanese and Choco is the chocolate. NARRATOR: Around the
same time Shinya Takahashi was coming to Nebraska because
of the football program, Kansas City native
Christopher Elbow was here as part of the University of
Nebraska Lincoln swim team. He is now a premier
chocolatier in his self titled chocolate empire
in Kansas City. CHRISTOPHER ELBOW:
Christopher Elbow Chocolates is a modern chocolate factory. We produce handmade bon
bons, truffles, confections with unique flavor combinations and also with a design element. We do a lot of hand
painting and air brushing so every chocolate that
we produce has its own, unique identity. NARRATOR: Christopher’s
road to success has been long and being a chocolatier
wasn’t part of his plan while attending the
University of Nebraska. CHRISTOPHER:
I was majoring in restaurant and food service
administration at UNL and a lot of the classes I
was in were very chemistry, food science centric
which actually gave me a really great foundation of when I did start
my culinary career. NARRATOR: Elbow
started out as a chef cooking savory food. CHRISTOPHER:
I had the opportunity
to work in a pastry kitchen out in Las Vegas and that’s
where I discovered my love for desserts and chocolate
and kind of all things sweet. NARRATOR: Even
though chocolate making wasn’t in the
plans when Christopher
was at the University, he says what he learned
there does translate. CHRISTOPHER:
Chocolate and pastry and
baking are very scientific and having that knowledge
that I learned at UNL really helped me gain insight
on how to correct problems and then come up with new
techniques and new ideas. NARRATOR: We visited
Elbow just three weeks after moving into his
new global headquarters in Kansas City. CHRISTOPHER:
We started in a 400 square
foot room above a restaurant. It was very small
scale, it was just me. Didn’t have any employees
other than my wife and my mom would come
down and help tie bows and things like that in the very early
parts of the business. But right from the beginning
we couldn’t keep up with demand. NARRATOR: The move to the
new building should allow for future expansion. CHRISTOPHER: All of our bon
bon and confection production will take place here and
it also houses all of our packaging operation, our
shipping and warehousing and then all of our
corporate offices. We were working under the
roofs of three buildings, separate buildings before
and just as we’ve grown we’ve kind of pieced
together what we could. But ultimately we
needed more space. NARRATOR: Confections
created here are works of art that go through many
steps before hitting the consumer’s mouth. CHRISTOPHER:
The bon bons is really what
we kind of became famous for. Kind of the core
part of our business. That process starts
out with airbrushing, the same airbrushes you
would use as a hobbyist and our paint so to speak,
is colored cocoa butter. We will paint the
molds with airbrushes or sometimes we’ll splatter
them or hand paint them. Once that is set we’ll pour
the chocolate into the mold and it will form the shell. Pour the excess out,
the rest will drip out and kind of leave
behind a thin shell. After that sets up that’s what
we’ll fill with our filling. NARRATOR: Fillings for
the Belgium style bon bons are made with well
thought out ingredients. Together they create
unique flavor combinations. CHRISTOPHER: We
like to a lot of really soft, infused caramels
using spices, herbs, different kinds of
fruits and flavors. Alcohols and things like
that that all go really, really well with chocolate. Once we make those and fill
them up, they’ll set for a day and then we’ll seal them up
the next day and turn them out. NARRATOR: The other
style of bon bon they create is called a French
style ganache. CHRISTOPHER: We would pour the
filling in a frame, we would cut it into
squares the next day and on the third day it would
go through an enrobing machine and get a really thin
coating of chocolate on it. Then we’ll actually decorate
those at that point, usually with what’s
called a transfer sheet which is cocoa butter
that’s been silk screened onto a sheet of acetate and
we put it on the chocolate when it’s wet, pull
it off after it’s set. It’s kind of like a temporary
tattoo so we can digitally create almost any design
for those types of bon bons. NARRATOR: Elbow and his
team are always looking for new flavor combinations
and those they come up with are intentional. CHRISTOPHER:
One thing that’s been
kind of a key to our success is we don’t do anything
weird for the sake of being weird or trendy. What I tell my staff is
if we eat it and we say huh, that’s interesting, then
it’s probably not something that we should sell. We like to keep things simple. The worst reaction a
customer could say would be that’s interesting. It’s the worst thing
you can say to a chef. NARRATOR: Even with room
for growth in the new space Christopher emphasizes
they aren’t looking to produce bigger batches of chocolate. CHRISTOPHER: We’re dedicated to
small batch production. We do want to grow and we do
want to make more chocolates but we’re at a certain
point where our batch size is perfect for
maintaining our quality. Our really primary focus
is to stay innovative and keep doing new
products and new flavors and kind of staying
at the forefront of the
chocolate world. NARRATOR: If Christopher
Elbow runs a chocolate empire in Kansas City, Susie
Robison is Tekamah’s queen and her shop Master’s
Hand is her castle. Nestled between
Sioux City and Omaha it started as a single mom
making candles with her kids. Now, it not only sells
candles but is a floral shop, boutique, lunchery, bakery
and of course, a candy shop. That part is known as
Serendipity Chocolates. SUSIE ROBISON: We are what we
call every woman’s dream shop but we’re also every
man’s dream shop when he’s in the doghouse. (laughing) We just wanted to
make a sanctuary, a place where women could go because unless you’re
intentional about life, it just passes you by. NARRATOR: When Susie decided to add Serendipity
Chocolates to the business, she looked to her
past for inspiration. SUSIE: That desire kind
of started with my mom and my aunt Esther and they
always made a lot of candies and things like that
at holiday times. Our chocolate covered
cherries and barks and toffees and things like that, that all came from
my mom and my aunt. NARRATOR: Susie says what
makes their chocolate so good is the ingredients used. SUSIE: We make everything
with real cream, real butter and real love
and not the fake love. You can get fake love anywhere, we make it real love and
that makes a difference. When people come in
we want them to leave with a sweet taste in their
mouth and so we give away a lot of just free samples. This little boy came
up and he was sampling all kinds of chocolate and so
the first one that he sampled, it was a peanut butter peanut and he apparently loved it a lot and he shouts over to his mom,
“Mom, you’ve gotta try this, “it’s a chance of a lifetime.” NARRATOR: Five years
ago Susie married Scott. A couple years after
that he lost his sight. Susie says it’s because of
all the adversity in her life that she is where she is today. SUSIE: The things that looked
horrible in the beginning they became part of the
rocky road of the story that we have to tell. In the early years
of Master’s Hand, when we just made
candles just to live, if somebody would’ve
just come behind me and just gave me 500 dollars, Master’s Hand would
never have been here. NARRATOR: Susie says there’s
something about chocolate that makes it perfect
for all occasions. SUSIE: I’ve never, out of all
the years that we’ve been here at Master’s Hand, I’ve
never had someone return a box of chocolate. It fits. You don’t have to worry
about getting the right size. Hi, I’m Susie and today we’re
gonna do a chocolate tip and I’m gonna teach
you how to make your own chocolate
bowls at home. You’re gonna take a balloon, you’re gonna dip it
in the chocolate, three times ’cause we’re
gonna try to make this look like a little tulip. And then I’m gonna
take it over here and I’m going to
put it on my tray. Now once it’s done
here I’m gonna take it and I’m gonna put it in the
cooler for about five minutes right in that area. Once it’s all cool I’m going to take them out of the cooler
and them I’m just gonna gently pop this balloon. Okay, now’s the fun part. You get to bring all
kinds of goodies here and we’re just
gonna fill them up. This right here is
a pudding mixture but you can use ice cream, you can use mousse. Oh, this is gonna be so good. Let’s put a few raspberries
in there because who couldn’t love raspberries. Yum. And then we’re gonna put
some whipped cream on top. There you go, something you
can do for your family at home. NARRATOR: Back in Kansas
City Christopher Elbow may be best known
for his bon bons but one of his most
recent endeavors is his Bean to Bar line of candy bars. To know where his cacao beans
come from and who grows them he travels extensively
to the growing regions and has done lots of
research on cacao in history. CHRISTOPHER ELBOW: The journey
from the discovery of cacao to present day to a
chocolate bar is a long, fascinating piece of history. I think 10,000 BP is when
chocolate was discovered in the Amazon basin and
typically it would’ve been used in the Mayan culture. They used to serve
it as a drink, a very bitter drink, a
very unfamiliar flavor. And then over time, the
cultures have learned that you can ferment the bean and dry it and
further refine it into what we associate chocolate
and the Europeans came over and landed in Central
and South America, say the natives
handling this bean, that’s a very precious currency
and something very valuable so they took it back
and it wasn’t until then that sugar started
being added to it and it becoming
something that we know of chocolate as today. NARRATOR: The cocoa
growing region is small and cacao is not a very
lucrative crop to farm. CHRISTOPHER:
Cacao grows typically
approximately 18 degrees north and south of the equator. It’s a very hot, tropical
and usually low altitude so it’s a little overlaps
with coffee a little bit but coffee would be
typically a higher altitude. NARRATOR: Cocoa
grows on trees and is difficult to grow
because the harvesting process cannot be mechanized and
some trees can grow up to 30 feet high. CHRISTOPHER: It’s a pod that
grows off the stems and trunks of trees
and inside that pod it would contain about
40 to 60 of the seeds or the beans that we call them and that’s covered with a
very citrusy sweet membrane that aids in the
fermentation process. It takes about
three to four years for a tree to bear fruit
and then another three to four years for it
to become fully matured to where it’s actually
producing a lot of fruit. NARRATOR: Christopher
gets beans from about 15 different countries
currently and he’s traveled all through Central
America into Columbia, Brazil, Peru and Ecuador
in South America. CHRISTOPHER: One of our goals is ultimately in an effort to
make cacao more sustainable, is to work with the farmers. Make sure they’re getting
a fair price for their crop and they have somebody
to sell it to. NARRATOR: Christopher
created a foundation where some proceeds
from the sales of his Bean to Bar products will support that effort. CHRISTOPHER:
The whole goal of visiting
the farmers is two fold. Number one to make sure
the product’s gonna be good and it’s gonna be something
that we’re gonna be able to make good chocolate out of. But also that their
conditions and the farmers are engaged in good practices. NARRATOR: Most cocoa
farmers don’t consume chocolate or know what it tastes like,
so Elbow gets satisfaction when he can provide
them their first taste of the end product. CHRISTOPHER:
We took a white chocolate
made with this group’s milk and their name is on the package and the kids were coming
up and just grabbing handfuls of this chocolate. To see them, you know, make the connection between
what we have created and what they have
provided us was a really kind of magical moment. NARRATOR: There are several
steps the bean goes through before it’s ready to
turn into the chocolate Nebraskans usually eat. After being hand harvested, the pods are broken open
and fermentation begins. CHRISTOPHER: The fermentation
process is really what starts creating the chocolate
flavors and precursors that we would associate
with chocolate. Once the fermentation happens
over about five to seven days, the beans are dried for
another five to seven days. NARRATOR: At this point
the beans are shipped to chocolate makers like
Elbow who further refine them. CHRISTOPHER: Our first step is
to sort through those and get rid of any
extraneous material. Sticks, rocks, things that
won’t make good chocolate but also broken beans, things
that got damaged in transit. The smallest amount
of negative beans would impact a
whole entire batch. (beans being placed
into roaster) The very first step in our
process and where we can start developing flavors
is the roasting process. It’s somewhat similar to
coffee where we’re roasting to a certain profile
for a certain bean. We’re doing it at a much
lower temperature though. NARRATOR: Roasting
typically takes about an hour and is carefully charted
to ensure the beans are cooked all the way
through and not burned. (beans poured into
cracking machine) CHRISTOPHER: The next step would
be to crack the beans and we would end up with
a big bucket of the shell and the cocoa bean so we put
them through what’s called a winnower and that
removes the shell so we’re left with
the very clean nib. That’s what will
formulate our recipe and go into the refiner. The point of the refiner
is to use heat and friction and pressure to basically
liquefy the bean. The bean is 50%,
roughly 55% fat cocoa in the form of cocoa butter
so we wanna break that down into a small particles
where it will liquefy and that allows us to actually
refine that chocolate down to a very smooth particle
size that’s gonna be really pleasing on the mouth. And we’ll also combine the
sugar in at that point as well. NARRATOR: Refining is
about a two day process. From there the liquid
goes into a conch for three or four more days. This is where final
flavor tweaks are made. CHRISTOPHER: With this machine
we have the ability to further push the flavor. We can take the
temperature up really high to where some of the
volatile acids will flash off. NARRATOR: Elbow found
that letting chocolate age before it is cast into a bar
further brings out the flavor. CHRISTOPHER:
Even after we make the
chocolate we typically put it into big blocks and we’ll store
it for two to three months before we cast it
into chocolate bars. NARRATOR: Christopher
hopes that by letting consumers see the process, they will have a heightened
awareness about how involved it is and not take each
chocolate bite for granted. Bean to Bar is a way to
get customers the freshest, purest end result as possible. That’s also the
foundation for Cup of Coa, a hot chocolate mix
originally produced in Salt Lake City but now owned and distributed in Nebraska. JASMIN McGINNIS:
I am an original Barista’s
Daily Grind barista. Barista’s started in 2001
here in Kearney, Nebraska. I am now the third
owner of this company and Cup of Coa was also a
Barista’s Daily Grind company that ownership has
passed on to me. NARRATOR: So how exactly
did the official sponsored cocoa for the 2002 winter
Olympic games in Salt Lake City end up in Nebraska? JASMIN: Coco Pub’s Cup of Coa
used to be originated in Utah and at the time our coffee
shop Barista’s Daily Grind was franchising all over
the state and we made-up 30% of Coco Pub’s sales. So when the original
owners of that company decided to move on
to something else, they asked us if we
would be interested in, in taking over the whole
company which we did back in 2007. NARRATOR: Jasmine fell
in love with Cup of Coa before becoming the owner. She hasn’t found any instant
hot chocolate she likes better so becoming the owner
was an easy decision. JASMIN: When you come across
something unique, something like this that
sticks in your memory, that sticks in your mouth, that even when you
haven’t had it for years you go back to, wow, that
was a good cup of cocoa, how can you not be
passionate about that. NARRATOR: To Jasmine,
the ingredients and recipe are what make Cup
of Coa stand out. JASMIN: Even though it is a
mix with water formula, there is tons of
milk in my product. We just found that
using a dry milk product produced a rich, creamy
cocoa so you can’t tell that my cocoa is
mixed with water. And then we also use three
different chocolates. One of them we
import from Germany, it’s a Dutch chocolate with
a really high fat content. What this means is when you
pour your water into my cocoa and you mix it, it
develops this really rich, creamy, frothy head. NARRATOR: Cup of Coa
is a luxury
hot chocolate made with all natural ingredients. Its unique characteristics
make it versatile, too. JASMIN:
We’re the only hot chocolate
company in the entire country that can be served hot. The same mixture can be
served blended or frozen. It can also be cooked
down into a syrup or sauce and our recipe’s unique
’cause you can do all of those things
with just water. Top it with a little
whipped cream. Good to go. NARRATOR: The cocoa
is produced in Nebraska and hand packed in Kearney
at Barista’s Daily Grind. JASMIN: We roll the tins by hand
and we’ll actually do that way in advance and
have them ready so that when the cocoa sleeves
show up we can just drop the cocoa sleeves
in, slap the lids on and ship from our
coffee shops out to all of the customers that
are ordering Cup of Coa. NARRATOR: Jasmine is happy that her specialty
hot chocolate allows Barista’s Daily Grind
to go beyond being just another coffee shop. JASMIN: Cup of Coa is a
signature product, it draws people. It’s so good that all of
those non-coffee drinkers will say, “Go to that
place because they have “the good hot chocolate.” GUY: Chocolate. MAN: Cheers.
GUY: Cheers. NARRATOR: Jasmine
enjoys being from Nebraska and she’s proud that her
small Nebraska company’s impact her home state. JASMIN:
I love our wide open skies and that life’s a
little slower here. I think that’s part of
the reason why we can appreciate fine things
because we take the time to notice them. People don’t realize what
amazing things are coming out of this part of the country and going all over
the United States. NARRATOR: Even
farther west in Sidney, 88 year old Bertha
Mueller ships her homemade chocolates
around the world. Mueller, known
mainly by the locals, is a former Cabela’s
employee who opens up her home twice a year at Christmas
and Valentine’s Day to her chocolate fans. CUSTOMER: Good morning. BERTHA: Welcome, come in. Glad you could come. BERTHA MUELLER:
The first years I made just
a little bit for my family and then I started
giving them as gifts and the people that we
gave them as gifts to very often said, “I wish
we could buy these.” and twelve years
ago at Christmas my husband died and he
died on December 2nd and it just was such a
blah holiday season for us and so my daughter Pam said, “Mom, do you think we should
try making and selling “some chocolates this year?” I said why not. PAM: Thank you, sir. CUSTOMER: Thank you very much. NARRATOR: The recipe
came from Bertha’s cousin who promised to share it
with her as long as she kept it in the family. BERTHA: The first of November
we start making the fondant and work really hard during
the whole month of November because it’s very
time consuming. We work long, long hours and
sometimes we really burn the midnight oil (chuckles) but it’s kinda fun because
Pam and I work together on it and so it gives us a
lot of together time. NARRATOR: Bertha
and Pam make at least 60 different flavors
which are offered in milk, dark or white chocolate
but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. BERTHA: I make 30 batches of
fondant and each batch makes 90 balls plus
I make all the fudges the sea salt
caramels have been a big seller the last few years. NARRATOR: Mrs.
Mueller went 12 years before a slight price
increase but it only covers cost of supplies. BERTHA: My son asked me, he said
“Well mom, do you make any money “doing that?” And I said, “Yes,
we make some money.” And he said, “Well do
you make minimum wage?” And I just laughed. I said, “If we paid
ourselves a dollar an hour “we would go way in the hole.” It’s not something you do
because you wanna make money, it’s something you do
because you love it. NARRATOR: Bertha
says at her age the feeling of
achievement is pay enough. BERTHA: It’s hard to find
anything that you really feel like you have
accomplished something and making the chocolates I feel like I’ve accomplished something and also it’s good
because people like them and it’s good to do
something that people want and that they want
bad enough come, to come out of their way to get. NARRATOR: Mueller
even mails chocolates for just the cost of postage
to fans around the country and the world. BERTHA: We have customers who
send us their Christmas list and we send like eight or 10
boxes to different locations around and the farthest I’ve
sent any is to Australia. Mostly it’s continental
United States and Alaska. NARRATOR: Only time
will tell how long Bertha will keep making and
selling her confections. BERTHA: I guess I’ll do it
as long as I enjoy it and when I stop enjoying it
then I won’t do it anymore. Lately, I said well maybe I’ll
retire when I’m 90 (chuckles) but that’s getting
pretty close now. CHRISTOPHER ELBOW: My name’s
Christopher Elbow from Christopher Elbow
Chocolates and today I am going to talk a little bit about how to store chocolate. Chocolate and cocoa butter
especially has a tendency to absorb odors so storing
chocolate right next to an onion in your kitchen
is probably not a good idea if you’re gonna use that
to bake a cake with. The best thing to do is
if you have any of these kind of air tight containers, these work really, really
well and get the air out. Then store these in
a cool, dark place. 60 degrees would be preferred. You can store them
in the refrigerator for longer term storage but we always recommend
making sure you bring it to room temperature before
you open up the package. Now, if you don’t have any of
these little containers here, you can always use
good old plastic wrap making sure you do a few
layers really, really tight. I would probably do two
to three layers before, especially if you’re gonna
put it in the refrigerator. Just like that. NARRATOR: Something
about chocolate brings people together. Bertha Mueller’s chocolates
attract family and friends for two special
chocolate holidays. Columbus author and speaker
Deb Burma noticed that too and that inspired her to
write a women’s bible study around the theme. DEB BURMA: And I pray this won’t
be the last time you hear it. May we never tire — We’ve been leading a
series of these events for a few years. When we started talking as a
team about what is one thing that most every woman shares a love for. Chocolate.
Yes, let’s talk chocolate. So, the exciting part
of me as I thought let’s do a chocolate
themed women’s event and see what happens. Hot chocolate, we have — NARRATOR: As Deb
started planning her event and looking through scripture, she had no problem finding
word pictures and themes that coincided with similar
chocolate connectors. DEB: What are all the
things we crave in life, seeking for something
that’s going to satisfy us and I’m taken to, I’m taken to God’s
word where He says that He satisfies every need of ours
through His glorious riches in Christ Jesus. I think about things
that are rich and lavish and how we savor chocolate
as it sits on our tongue and we long for more, right? So, what’s rich and lavish? God’s rich grace for us
that He lavished on us. Right there, in the
pages of scripture. I love the delicious
blend of chocolate and coffee. NARRATOR: Deb planned
her chocolate retreat and its success showed her
that chocolate did in fact, bring women together. DEB: We brought chocolate
in and we had, as I said, topped
out 60 to 100 women. Suddenly 220 women walked
through the door that morning and we saw that chocolate
brought women together. What is it about chocolate, I think it’s rich, it’s lavish, it’s delicious, let’s be real. And it’s beautiful. NARRATOR: Deb’s book
Living a Chocolate Life uses recipes and every day
experiences to help women relate to words in the bible. DEB: An extravagant, three
layer chocolate cake that I baked only to find a
catastrophe on my hands as it split in two
and cascaded down the sides of the cake
plate and onto the table. One big crumbling mess
and sometimes our lives feel like one big
crumbling mess. NARRATOR: Burma understands
that the Bible
and Bible studies can be intimidating
and she finds that the relatable topic
of chocolate breaks down some of those walls. DEB: With the concept
and even the title, Living a Chocolate Life, women were not afraid
to bring a friend, a neighbor, somebody who
had been maybe hesitant, unresponsive in the
past or just intimidated about Bible study to
see that it can be real, a real place, an authentic place of sharing and giggling and maybe some tears, growing together
around chocolate. Around such a fun,
relatable topic. NARRATOR: Deb loves seeing
people across the country share her Bible study and
recipes while enjoying
girl time in the name of chocolate. DEB: You can find chocolatiers
and chocolate shops all over this country and
beautifully right here in Nebraska. Chocolate is so appealing that who can’t talk about it? NARRATOR: As a Christian
author and speaker Deb Burma wears her
faith on her sleeve. Melissa Stephens of The
Cordial Cherry in Omaha shares a love for God
and credits Him for being where she is today. She just didn’t think it
would happen by making adorable little snowmen. MELISSA STEPHENS:
Over the years I’ve seen how
He’s been able to use that for His purpose and it’s
been a really neat lesson. Everything from all
of the fundraisers that we’ve been able
to be a part of. The thousands of chocolates
that we’ve donated to help contribute to
needy families and children and different organizations
that are important to just the gift giving
to touch somebody’s heart and make someone smile
that needed that. I no longer feel I’m not
doing something noble I actually feel like exactly
what God designed me to do. NARRATOR: And what
she was designed to do? Create chocolate
covered cherries that are not only delicious
but are almost too cute to eat. MELISSA: A lot of people are
surprised to find out that everything on there
is completely edible. We also get a lot of people
who are surprised to find out everything’s done by hand. We don’t use any molds to
create any of the pieces or designs for our
cordial cherries. Everything, start to
finish is done by hand. NARRATOR: Melissa learned
how to make cordial cherries from her grandmother and
that was just the beginning of what would become The
Cordial Cherry in Omaha. MELISSA: She’d always made them
for a Christmas treat for us so it had become a holiday
tradition for our family. Eventually I was curious
enough I wanted to learn how to make them myself. She was kind of reluctant
because it’s quite a process. Took about a week or so of
her kind of working with me but I was able to get it down. NARRATOR: Before any
decorating can take place the cherries must be turned
into cordial cherries. MELISSA: We order in all of our
cherries from the Washington, Oregon area. The next step is
draining the cherries. We have to prepare
a liquid fondant, it’s kind of a hot liquid
fondant so once it cools it’s hardened. Once we set them
down on the paper they cool down immediately
and are hardened. We have about an hour
or so before we have to dip them in chocolate
to create a, a casing so
that that liquification
can start to develop while they’re encased
in the chocolate. NARRATOR: Melissa
estimates she has come up with 200 plus cherry
designs over the years. MELISSA: My favorite
cordial cherry design is our snowman cordial cherries. It’s a really fun
one just because there’s so much versatility. They look so happy as
you’re making them. It’s hard to not make
them and not smile and it’s got a soft spot in
my heart ’cause it was one of my very first designs. NARRATOR; Melissa is an
interesting mix of artist and scientist. She has a bachelors
degree in biotechnology and a teaching degree
with a masters in biology. She was teaching and
getting her doctorate in education administration
when she started making chocolates to help
pay for her education. All of this while
raising four kids. MELISSA: I am left brain,
right brain definitely. I had a background in
pottery so that was kind of my foundation which I use a
lot of those same techniques actually in the sculpting and
such of some of the chocolates that we do but I’m also
very analytical so I love science and research
and problem solving which has benefited me
in terms of business. NARRATOR: Even
beyond the recipe family was the key motivation
to the Cordial Cherry’s roots. MELISSA: One of the primary
motivators for opening my shop was my desire to
home school my kids. I was a teacher and it was
really tugging at my heart that I was teaching everybody
else’s kids every day and I was missing out on
watching my kids learn. NARRATOR: And family
is still one of the keys to its success. MELISSA: I was literally
working around the clock. I recruited everybody who
I could possibly recruit so that meant my kids were
in there folding boxes, my dad was in there. I don’t even thing he’s
made a sandwich before and he learned to dip cherries. My sister was there and
her husband and we just had everybody who was
willing to help come in and sort of rescue me
that first holiday season. As soon as we got through
that season we realized okay, we are actually
onto something. There’s no way I can do
this by myself and so my mom and sister at
the time were willing to jump in as partners. NARRATOR: The chocolate
makers we visited do most of their business
between October and February. Melissa found that to be
true of her shop as well. MELISSA: Our most popular design
if we compared the entire year would still be our holiday
designs and among those it’s probably a toss up between
our nativity collection, which is a nine piece
collection that landed on Oprah’s list a few years ago, kind of put us on the map. That was exciting and
the just stereotypical Christmas designs so our santas, reindeer, elves and snowmen. NARRATOR: Besides the
acclaim of making Oprah’s list, Melissa’s chocolates have
been gifted at the Emmy awards a few times. They’ve been featured
in entrepreneur.com and they’ve appeared
on The Today Show. And although those
accolades are appreciated Stephens won’t
take all the credit. MELISSA: I just feel blessed. We have a business that we
do some really unique things and we’ve had some incredible
opportunities come our way and I don’t think
that’s by chance. NARRATOR: Melissa is a
woman with many passions who can’t sit still. She recently obtained
a patent pending on one of her inventions. MELISSA: I had this idea
to be able to stack pastries without them crushing
each other and to create really cool huge towers of
pastries and other food items. It’s called Haute Stacker. NARRATOR: Another one of
Melissa’s passions is mentoring especially up and coming
women entrepreneurs. One mentee is
Alexandra Ratigan. She is a chocolatier on
staff at The Cordial Cherry who has her own
brand of chocolates called The Chocolate Poet. MELISSA: I’ve just mentored
her along the way just to kind of help her get
her business up and running and so not only does she
manufacture her chocolates here but we sell her chocolates
in the shop as well. NARRATOR: Passionate about
chocolate, others, and life, Melissa is surely
living a chocolate life. One common denominator in all
of these stories is family. Chocolate making brings
families together. Chocolate eating brings
friends together like family. KEVIN BAKER: It’s tough to
work with family and we’ve done a very good job at it. I can see the grandkids, we got one granddaughter, she’d worked here tomorrow
if she quit school. I think the legacy
will have nothing to do with the business
itself but basically being able to run a business with all the family involved without fights, quarrels,
and we’ve done real well. We haven’t had too
many really bad spots. MARGARET LEHL:
Well, I met him in May, he was a candy maker and
we got married in October. We were married 36 years
before he passed away. MOTHER-IN-LAW: Kanpai.
SHINYA: Kanpai. SHINYA TAKAHASHI:
When we go to those
events she’s really good at promoting my chocolates. I think it’s a really
good partnership. CHRISTOPHER ELBOW: My wife’s
name is Jennifer Elbow and she is responsible
for creating the logo and the
branding of our company and has played a huge part
in helping us grow our brand and fine tune it over the years. DEB BURMA: The thing about
chocolate that is so successful at bringing people
together it is considered first of all, the number
one food craving in America and that especially by women. It’s so delicious,
it’s so enjoyed by all and it’s such a fun way
that we can gather together. SUSIE ROBISON: I just have a
team of just amazing gals and they love what they do
and they just bring joy here and they’re just really great. I’m functional in all
the areas but my girls are great at all the areas. MELISSA STEPHENS:
My mom’s my best friend, my sister’s amazing. I’m so grateful to both of them. My dad is a huge support. He’s there any time I need help just pitching in to make things or helping with my kids
’cause we’re so busy. BERTHA MUELLER:
It’s just a wonderful
mother/daughter experience and I couldn’t do
it without her. It’s a challenge for her
because she works long hours at her job and has
other responsibilities. I appreciate her so much. MELISSA STEPHENS:
Hi, my name is Melissa Stephens and I own The Cordial Cherry. Today I’m going to show you
how to make one of our favorite holiday designs, our
snowman cordial cherry. Everyone of our snowman heads
are made completely by hand. We come in and we just
create a little carrot nose with some orange colored
confectionary coating. One of my favorite
tools is a paperclip. We use this to actually
make our little eyes. To create the hat, I’m
actually using just a piping cone made out
of parchment paper. We just do a first layer,
just a little dollop. The second layer, same
idea but a little smaller and we finish that up
with a candy piece on top. And then to pull it all
together we actually trim one of our cordial
cherries, we take the stem off and we have to seal that top
so that they syrup inside doesn’t leak out. That serves a couple purposes. Not only to seal it
but it also provides somewhere for our
scarf as well as a point of contact to
glue the little head on. (mellow orchestral music) Captions by FINKE/NET (mellow orchestral music) Copyright 2019
NET Foundation for Television

Why is Relativity Hard? | Special Relativity Chapter 1


Hi, this is Henry, and this is the first in a series of videos about special relativity This is definitely not an academic course, but it’s going to be a more in-depth and developed exploration of a single topic than a typical standalone minute physics video. I’ve been greatly inspired and heckled to do this by my friend Grant Sanderson of Three Blue One Brown who set the standard for this kind of thing with his excellent series series’es? on calculus and linear algebra. So, special relativity. Special relativity is one of the most popularly famous ideas in physics It’s the thing that Einstein figured out about the speed of light and space and time and e equals mc-squared It changed our understanding of the universe and its core ideas are accessible in principle to anyone who understands some basic algebra and geometry You don’t even need to know calculus And yet in spite of this special relativity is one of the subjects in physics that confuses the most people and in many cases turns them away from physics altogether I think in part This is because special relativity is not quite a big enough subject to ever get its own full class in physics departments you might see classical mechanics or quantum mechanics or electromagnetism or intro to general relativity on a course syllabus But it’s surprisingly rare to see special relativity Even though relativity is an essential building block upon which most of the rest of modern physics depends Special relativity is typically relegated to just a few days squeezed into the beginning or end of other physics courses. However, the more important reason special relativity confuses so many people is that it’s almost always introduced confusingly with lots of complicated algebraic equations with Delta X’s and Delta X Prime’s and square roots Which sometimes you divide by and sometimes you multiply by and all the while you’re scrambling to figure out where in all this symbol logical mess they’re hiding a supposedly mind-blowing insight about the fundamental nature of space and time Special relativity doesn’t have to be that way. And I think the complicated explanations have only survived this long because they’re how Einstein did it. But he was a professional physicist climbing an intellectual mountain up its steepest face. And I don’t think that we should require everyone who learns about special relativity now to have to follow the same path Einstein did Especially not now that we have super beautiful and simple geometric ways of explaining it Essentially we figured out afterwards that there’s a much easier way to climb the mountain than what Einstein did, a way that you could probably even figure out on your own, given the right prompting. And it’s that fundamentally beautiful simple geometric way to understand space and time that I want you to leave with after watching this series of videos. If all goes well, hopefully you’ll gain some intuition for what special relativity really is, why it works why it’s right, and why all those paradoxes you’ve probably heard about aren’t paradoxical at all. They’re just easy confusions to stumble into when you’re attacking things with an army of square roots This is going to require some mental effort from your end. There’s a very real mathematical sense in which learning special relativity is kind of like living your entire life thinking the earth is flat And then learning that the earth is actually round. A round Earth isn’t actually that complicated of a thing to picture I mean, it’s just a ball But trying to get used to that idea, to really take it in and figure out how your day-to-day experiences on this flat seeming surface of the earth– how they fit into this new round earth idea– that would certainly take some mental effort. It is, though, a totally different kind of mental effort from plugging lots of numbers into complicated square root formulas and ultimately, much more worthwhile I mean you probably have a pretty good intuition about round Earth concepts, like what happens if you just keep walking east and what’s the shape of the Earth’s shadow on the moon without having to do complicated calculations in spherical polar coordinates. In fact we’re gonna take this analogy to the extreme. Just like a globe is a really useful hands-on visual way to explore what it means for the earth to be round because a globe comes with roundness built-in, I’ve designed and had built a hands-on space-time globe that has special relativity built in. It’s not quite as simple as a globe globe because special relativity is a little weirder than roundness But the thing I like about this machined aluminum space-time globe is that it’s a physical manifestation of the intuition that I hope you develop for special relativity. We’re going to use it to gain a hands-on understanding of the twins paradox, length contraction, and time dilation, why nothing can go faster than light, and much more. I hope to see you in the next video And while you’re waiting for the next special relativity video to come out you might want to check out this video’s sponsor: Brilliant.org a site full of interactive quizzes and mini courses on physics and math. As you’ve probably heard me say before, if you want to understand physics deeply, you really have to think through ideas and solve problems yourself and Brilliant offers a great way to do just that– either by learning a new topic, like neural networks practicing problem solving in an area you already know, like algebra or solving tricky puzzles, like this one. If you decide to sign up for premium access to all of their courses and quizzes, you can get 20% off by going to brilliant.org/minutephysics. Again, that’s brilliant.org/minutephysics, which lets Brilliant know you came from here

DOOM (1993 ORIGINAL GAME) (Teens React: Retro Gaming)


♪ (old-school video game music) ♪ – “Doom.” Never heard of it. – Doom? I’ve never heard
of this game before. – It kinda looks like maybe Mars. And they’re fighting off maybe aliens. – Doom. Why not?
I’ve never played the first. It’s probably one of the most
iconic shooters ever. – Doom! Oh my god,
this is such a throwback! I used to play it
when I was younger a lot. – (Finebros) With Doom
releasing a reboot to the series later this month, we are
having you play the original that was first released in 1993
for PC on four floppy disks. – That’s a lot of floppy disks. I don’t think I know
what a floppy disk is. Are they the things that, um–
they’re kinda like square-looking, and they look like
the Save button on a computer. – I don’t even know what that means. But I remember playing
the game on a computer. – Damn, that’s like
three years older than me. – I was negative five
years old. (chuckles) I was just not even a thought yet. – (Finebros) You ready to get started?
– (nervously) No. – “Hurt me plenty”?
– (Finebros) Yeah, “hurt me plenty.” – Savage!
♪ (intense 8-bit rock music) ♪ Oh. Oh, whoa! I’ve seen this before! – Oh my gosh, the music. Throwback. – Oh shit, look at
those graphics. [Bleep]. This is ’93? God damn!
Look at the technology. Okay, let’s get it. – Let’s see. We’re going
left, forward, back. Just got to try out all the keys. – Okay. Oh, I can’t look down?
That’s disappointing. – What is this? Oh, 101% health? – All right, then.
I’m out to save the day. – Do I have to jump? Okay, cool. I already get up these things. Do I have to kill those? I can’t tell. We’ll see. We’ll see.
Is that anything I need? – 100% armor. – I already know the layouts of the level. Like, I already know where I’m gonna go. – Oh. There’s a corridor. – Is free roaming
wherever I go or what? – And I think that’s a dead monster. Okay. Let’s go this way.
There’s another dead guy. – Are you a door? All right. Oh, I see you guys. – Oh no. Dude, do I like them?
Do I not like them? (demons screech)
Ugh. (gunshot)
Aah! – Oh, [bleep]. – Die, heathens!
(demon groans) – These are armor. Okay. – Oh. Nope. Nope. (gunshots, demons lowing) – Okay, cool. I killed him. – Ooh, head shot, head shot, head shot. Damn, bang bang. – Oh, there’s a guy
right there. Oh my god. – Those things in the back
are gonna shoot fireballs at you. So don’t get too close. – Okay. Let’s try not to get killed. That might not be an option. – Bang bang. Ah ah ah, ooh. I see the– I see, uh–
can I not raise my gun? – How do I get up there
and kill that thing? I don’t think I can, ’cause it’s high.
And I can’t aim up. – I should probably kill him. (gunshots, demon growling) Okay. Oh, Jesus Christ. (giggles) Okay. – Make my way through here,
get some ammo-nition. – Okay, let’s go. Oh shit! Oh god! – Oh my god. (screams shrilly) Oh, I killed him though, I think. (gunshots and growling)
– Argh! Aw, yes, I killed it!! – Oh. Argh, you sumbitch. – Okay. This is the end? Right here? But there’s a secret over here. (player grunts, pants)
And there’s a new gun and health. So now I have a shotgun. – Hold up, let me jump through that. Oh my god. I just got a shotgun? I just got a secret–
come on, man. Look at this. – It’s an exit? Wait,
is that where I have to go? (door whirs) – Oh, it’s an elevator? ♪ (jittery beat) ♪
Oh, I did stuff. Yeah! ♪ (jittery beat) ♪ – Oh heck yeah, I didn’t die? – It is pretty cool. I can see why people were
addicted to it back then. – It was easiest. There was more to it. If that’s just level one, understandable. – This one’s gonna be easy as well. Okay. I am here. – I am there. “Nuclear plant.” – All right, cool. ♪ (foreboding music) ♪ – Oh my god. There’s so many
dead friends everywhere. – I think in this level, you need keys. – It’s a little sketchy. (demons lowing) (gunshots, demons groaning) Die! This is fun. (demon growls)
– Oh my god, oh my god. Did you hear that? Oh my god. (gunshots)
Oh my god. Oh my god. Brah. – Oh damn, one hit. – Is there armor? There’s
a chest plate up over there. (beep)
(hums nonchalantly) ♪ (beat picks up) ♪
– I want to find secret stuff. Okay.
(lift whirs) This seems promising. (lift whirs) Ooh, look at that. See?
Put your mind in something. – Whoa. What? Oh. (excitedly) Oh, is this another weapon? (whispers) Yes! – (gasps) I found another gun! (demons roaring) – Aah!
(demons groan) See how helpful the shotgun is? (demon groans)
One-hit kill. So this red thing means
I need to find a red key to get into that door.
So I have to look for the red key. – Just gotta– all right,
I think this is where I have to go. (door whirs)
Ooh! Ooh, you dead. (chuckles) (demon groans)
– Cool. Health-healths. – Okay, we’re at 72% health. (gunshots)
No! Okay, cool. – Ugh, that’s one! Get– Oh, hey buddy. Bam! (laughs) – Oh. I got a red thing.
What is that? Is that a secret? – The red key should be
right here, around here. There it is. See, I remember.
I remember. Heh. (demon groans)
– Head shot. (door whirs)
Oh, it looks like we’re back here. – Uh, I don’t really know
where I’m going now. – All right. I don’t know
what my main plot is. I think that’s the only thing
that I’m confused about. But everything else
seems to be pretty good. – I feel like there’s some
lore to it that I’m missing. But I don’t know if this game
really dives into that. – This one I didn’t go through. (door whirs) – Here’s the red door.
So I’m gonna go in there. (door whirs) – People to kill. Die!
Take me to your leader! – Oh my god, oh my god. Oh my god. Oh my god. Oh my god. (shaky sigh) That’s what happens
when you don’t be low-key!! (door whirs) – Okay. I feel like there’s
gonna be a lot of monsters, since they gave me a lot of health. So… (door whirs, demons low) Oh, I was right. – Oh, shit. Why does a game that’s
over 20 years old startle me? – Oh my god. Holy crap! Holy crap! Holy crap! Oh my god. Bro. – [Bleep] that, bro. [Bleep] that. – Oh, crap! Die! (cracking up) Die… die… This is awesome. (gunshot and growl)
– (fiercely) Yes! Okay. I just killed another
one of those demon people. – Can’t see anything. Maybe this way. I was already here. You know, just because
I don’t know where I’m going doesn’t mean I’m lost. I’m just exploring. Not all those who wander are lost. Although in this case,
I have no idea where I am. – So we’re gonna click this. (door whirs)
That opens that. – There IS a switch.
Is that a space bar too? (door whirs)
Yes. Ooh! Secret passageway. – Ooh. Ooh, this looks suspicious. Oh, what the heck? What is this? – This game has a lot of secret pathways. I think that’s the only thing
that’s gonna screw me over in the long run. (door whirs, demons growling) – (stoically) Oh, I’m scared.
I’m so scared, man. (gunshots, demons groaning) – Too easy. (player panting) – (nervously) No! Aah, aah, aah. Don’t kill me. Don’t kill me. Okay. So I killed one of them. (door whirs, demons groaning)
– Kill it. Die. (demon groans)
Aah! (demon growling)
Oh my god! Oh my god! Oh my god! Oh my god! Literally oh my god. This thing looks promising, I guess. There’s a switch right there. – There’s like a little triangle glowing. – Think I killed everything. ♪ (jittery beat) ♪ (excitedly) Wait, did I finish? – I’m gonna leave this stupid place. ♪ (jittery beat) ♪ I beat it. – This game’s actually not
that bad for such an old game. – You have your mazes,
and then you have your monsters. Portal and Gears of War into one. – That was really fun.
I’m excited for the new version. – The game itself– there wasn’t
anything special about it, ’cause I personally don’t really
like games where you just go and you shoot, and that’s
all you do, and you collect stuff. I like story-based games,
so I was not a big fan of this game. – It was fun how you had to explore and figure out which way you were going. – I’m having fun going around
finding out what’s going on, shooting all these
bad guys with a shotgun. I’m glad I found it. – Oh my gosh. Like,
I totally forgot about this game. I used to play this game
so much when I was younger. And I know all the secrets. I know all the different
levels and endings. It’s just a really fun game. – (Finebros) Like we mentioned, Doom is being remade for the current gen, and we want you to take a look at it.
– All right. – I think it probably will look cool. I’m imagining a really
Halo-y looking thing. ♪ (intense music) ♪ – Definitely amped up the graphics. – Bethesda or whatever.
The same people who make Fallout. – (laughs) Already I’m like,
“Well damn, what an improvement.” (chuckles) – Okay, this looks good so far. (blast)
Okay, see, like, look. Now those monsters actually look scary. I would not play this game. (metallic ringing, gun blasts) – Double barrel.
It’s actually pretty cool. – Okay. I don’t know. It doesn’t look as scary
as I would imagine it. (mechanical whirring) (boom)
– All right, this is pretty sick. Oh– oh jeez. (saw grinds)
– Oh, and the blood looks realistic too. – See, if this is what
I was going through, I would be way more enter– Yes. I would be so entertained. – Oh. It looks more futuristic than scary. – Okay, I’m feeling that.
I’m feeling that. That kinda like Gears of War
type stuff going on. – That’s so cool. That’s so cool! – That’s– that’s an
improvement, all right. I would actually want
to keep playing this game now. It’d make you badass as hell. Like, this doesn’t even
compare to Halo anymore. – Thanks for watching Gaming
on the React channel. – What games should we play next?
Let us know in the comments. – Subscribe to get more Gaming episodes. – Bye! I’m not that sure we should
be trying to land on Mars now. ♪ (old-school video game music) ♪

Richard Osman’s House of Games – S03E10 (18 Oct 2019)


APPLAUSE Well, hello there. What a week we are having on House
Of Games – the closest week in the history of the show. At the end of today, somebody is going to walk away
with this trophy. But, as yet, we literally have no
idea who it’s going to be. It could be any one
of the following four. They are Scarlett Moffatt.
APPLAUSE THROUGHOUT Iain Stirling. Angellica Bell and Gyles Brandreth. Shall we see
why we have no idea who will win? We’ll take
a look at the weekly leaderboard. We’ve been here four days. Gyles has
won a couple, Angellica’s won one. Scarlett won yesterday and here’s how the weekly
leaderboard stands. Two points between the lot
of you. Gyles just edging in front with 12. Scarlett, you have 11, Angellica ten, and Iain ten,
as well. But only one person can walk away
with the trophy. Iain? Yes.
Now, three second places. Yes. This would be a good day to win –
it’s eight points for first place on Double Points Friday. Six for
second, four for third, two for fourth.
Surely you’ve got to win one. I’d like to think I’ve got
a win in me. Excellent. Fingers crossed for you. Scarlett. I’m just pleased that I’ve
got some points. Honestly, on Monday, I really didn’t
think that I was going to get
any, so… And look at you now. Look at you fly. Scarlett blossomed. Didn’t she just? She turned into
this extraordinary thing. Frankly, the rest of us were just
flattened against the wall, gasping in admiration. Says the man
currently top of the leaderboard. Yeah! But, no, only temporary.
Just a moment. But if you can win today,
you will win the whole thing. Angellica. Hello. You have a win under your belt,
as well. Took home that lovely wheelie suitcase.
I know! Shall we take a look at today’s
prize board? These are the things you could have.
THEY GASP IAIN: There’s booze! There’s booze.
ANGELLICA: Oh, my goodness! Look at the doll! What would
everyone go for here? Scarlett? The doll. You. Yeah.
The posable doll. Iain? I’m going to go for the doll.
You’re going for the doll. That’s got to be universal, hasn’t
it? Yeah, exactly, the doll. Gyles. I’m quite tempted
by that deckchair. It’s good isn’t it? It is.
Yeah, it’s nice, that one. Listen. What a week. Been terrific
quizzing from everybody. It’s been great fun, as well. But
one of you is going to win that trophy. Could be any one of
you. I wish you all the very best of
luck. Shall we play our first round?
Yup. Yes. On Friday’s House Of Games
and our final House Of Games of the week, our first round is… I’m going to go along the line
and give you each a question. You’ll see a bit of that question
is in capital letters and the answer is an anagram of those capital
letters. Oh. OK? So there will be a question and, within the question, the answer
will be there somewhere. First question goes to you,
Scarlett. Mm-hm. OK? And the first category is… Oh, yeah. Famous Peaks. What famous
peak is this…? Um… Oh! I know it! Go on. It is… ..Mount Everest. Is that right? Mount Everest is the right answer. APPLAUSE Iain, here’s one for you. So lumpy. Lumpy. Lumpy. So… So… Olumpy… Mul… Molumpy. LAUGHTER Moulpys. Moulpys. If you would like to learn Latvian,
you can… LAUGHTER Let’s go with M as a start. Molsupy. Molsupy. Molsupy! Point, please, Richard,
thank you very much. Has he stumbled across it? Is it Molsupy? WRONG ANSWER BUZZER
No! It’s not. Gyles? Olympus. Olympus is the answer. SCARLETT AND IAIN: Aaaw. Angellica. Here we go.
Here’s your first one. Um… I’ve got quite a useful
technique that I use. Just go…
SHE SPEAKS NONSENSE
Yeah, basically. So many letters. Angellica, we can time you
out if you wish. Yeah, time me out. Dah! Gyles takes it. Sugarloaf Mountain. Is it? Sugarloaf Mountain is the answer.
Well done. SCARLETT: That sounds lovely,
doesn’t it? Gorgeous. Gyles, a peak for you. It’s a European mountain. But what is it? Scarlett has a finger on the buzzer. But we know that often
that’s a very, very heavy bluff. What do you think at home,
have you got this one? Shall we time out you out, Gyles?
I think you have to. Agh! Scarlett? Is it…?
I’m making this up, just because…
Is it Mont Anther? Is it Mont Anther? I made it up! It’s not. Iain, you can buzz in, if you want.
I didn’t know what it was, I just wanted to look clever.
I thought she’d know the answer. And now! See how that’s blown
up in your face. Yes, Iain? Mont… ..Remorth. I think that’s the baddie
in the Harry Potter books. Yes. Is it Mont Remorth? The word’s like there and there,
I can’t put it… Grr. Yeah, that’s the problem. Mine is that I don’t know the
answer. Yeah. I was just guessing. Shall I put you out of your misery? Well done at home if you said
Matterhorn. ALL: Oh! Matterhorn is the answer.
There was no “mont” in it. I would have got it if you hadn’t
said “mont” and thrown me off the scent. ANGELLICA: Yeah, the “mont” threw me
off. Scarlett, back to you. Your next
category is… The answer is in the question
in the capital letters. The only Egyptian women
I can think of… Go for it. They’re all on the buzzer.
..is Cleopatra. Is that an anagram
of “a clear top”? Course it is. Yeah! It is indeed.
Yeah, it is! There you go. APPLAUSE Iain? Yes. Sir, here is your
historical figure. You can do this, come on. Oh, my God I know it! Oh, no. If I know it… You, come on. You can do this.
Shrewd cranial activity. Everyone’s on the buzzer.
Come on, think about it. This is so embarrassing.
I hate… I hate this game so much. I can’t think. Shall we time you
out? Agh. I can’t. I’ll time you out. Have a little buzzer race between
everybody else. Scarlett wins the race. Charles Darwin. Is that right? Charles Darwin is the answer.
Ironically, I gave very good evidence there that we
came from apes. LAUGHTER Angellica, here is your historical
figure, but who is it? Marie Antoinette.
Is that the right answer? Well played, Marie Antoinette. Gyles, you’re the last player
in this round. Yeah. I’m just checking all the words
are there. Emmeline Pankhurst? Emmeline
Pankhurst is the answer. Well played, Gyles,
well played, everybody. It’s the end of that round.
Shall we take a look at the scores? I’d rather not. Ouch. Iain, you have a zero.
Angellica, you have one. This has literally been the last
few days in a row. We have joint leaders and they are
Gyles and Scarlett. Happens every day.
Three points each. Maybe mountains and historical
things aren’t your… Not for me. Hills and the past.
Don’t like it. Shall we see what round two is?
Yup. It is… Old hills. LAUGHTER This is a pairs game. The person
in last place gets to choose their partner.
Iain, once again, it’s you. Every day this week,
you’ve been with Scarlett. Yes. And every day this week
Angellica has been with Gyles. Would you like to carry
that on? I think it’s only fair that we end the week
as we started it. I’ll go with Scarlett,
of course. OK, going with Scarlett. Now,
what happens in this round, I’m going to read you some
questions. Every answer has two words in it.
OK? If you buzz in, I just want
you to give me the first word of the answer. OK? If it’s right, I will then ask
your partner to give me the second word of the answer. OK.
And you only get a point if you get the full answer.
Here’s your first question. It has a two-word answer. Iain. Arthur’s. Arthur’s is correct.
Scarlett, for the point? Hills. Is it Arthur’s Hills? It’s not, I’m afraid. Gyles? Seat. Arthur’s Seat is the answer. A point to Gyles and Angellica. Here’s your next question. Give me the first
word of this answer, please. That is Scarlett. The. Is it? Correct. Yes! I didn’t know “the” was
going to be the thing. Corrs. It’s The Corrs. Yes! You’re back in it!
We’re back in the room! Next question. Good luck, everybody.
Fingers on buzzers. Yes, Iain. Mr. Is correct. Scarlett? Tic… Tiggle…Tiggles! Yeah. Mr Timbles! Mr Tiggles! It is not, I’m afraid.
I can’t take it. Angellica. Mr Tumble. Is that right? Mr Tumble is the answer. Well played. Well done.
APPLAUSE Next question. That is Scarlett. Ah! Oh! Er, oh. Er… Er… Sally. Is it Sally? That’s a correct answer. What you do with ten pins.
SHOUTING Hey! No, no! I know the answer! Oh, do you?! SCARLETT WHISPERS ANSWER I literally know the answer! What is it? Bowles. ANGELLICA: She
just told him. I genuine… Listen, hand on my heart, I genuinely actually know the answer
to that. RICHARD SIGHS Also hand on my heart, she bowled at
me and said Bowles out loud at me. I did cheat. I’m sorry, Richard. Oh, I know you cheated. Would you be comfortable if we give
Iain a point and not give Scarlett the point? Do we believe
that Iain knew it? Yes! SCARLETT: Yeah. Scarlett, zero points. Yeah,
sorry. Iain, look me in the eyes. Did you know the answer? I knew
the answer to that question. A point for Iain,
no points for Scarlett. Wise judge. There we go. Here’s your next question. Yes, that is Iain. Get. Is correct. Scarlett? Out. Is it Get Out? Well played. Get Out. Oh, well done. Final question in this round.
Two-word answer. Give me the first word
of this answer, please. Yes, Iain. Rabbie. Rabbie. I’ll give you that. Scarlett? M-M-M-McDonald. So close. So close. Angellica. Burns. Is it… ..Burns? Is that who Burns Night’s named
after? ALL: Yes. Oh, that’s amazing! We are two rounds down in our final
day of House Of Games this week. Let’s take a look at our
leaderboard. ANGELLICA: Oh! It’s very close… ANGELLICA: How did you get that? Well done, Gyles. Who is going to win? Let’s play
Round three, shall we? It is… Now, before I tell you
how we play this, I’ll tell you what the elephant
in the room is today and it is… Cap. ANGELLICA: Oh, baseball cap.
OK. I’m going to ask you a series of questions. Fingers on buzzers.
Give me the answer. But if the word cap appears anywhere
in that answer, do not say that word. If it’s the beginning, or the end
or the middle, leave out the word cap. Here is your first one… Yes, that is Angellica. Pulets. Not correct, I’m afraid. Scarlett? Ulets. Well done. Unlucky, Angellica. Capulets, you
lose the cap, it’s the Ulets. Not the Pulets. Yes. Next question – leave out the cap,
please. Yes, that is Scarlett. Ricorn. Correct again. Capricorn becomes Ricorn.
Very quick, Scarlett. Very quick. She is on it. I want that trophy! You really do
want that trophy. You’re going to get it.
Next question. Yes, Scarlett? Leonardo… ..Di… ..Rio. That’s right. It is Leonardo Dirio. APPLAUSE Here’s your next question. Yes, Scarlett? Er, ula. It’s incorrect, I’m afraid. Gyles? Ula. Incorrect, as well. No, no!
The S is often silent. Well… Iain? Sula. Is the right answer. Well done. Ah! Scapula becomes sula. Scapula. Next question.
That was a good one, that. ANGELLICA: Yeah, that was a good
one. Good luck. Yes, Iain. Es…ologist. Is that right? Esology or esologist is
the right answer. Well played. Next question. Yes, that is Iain. Ulti. No. Oh. Ah, no! It’s incorrect, I’m afraid. Oh, you idiot. Scarlett? Al… ..Cino. IAIN LAUGHS HYSTERICALLY Incorrect, I’m afraid.
Is it incorrect?! Why? Yeah, because he’s not real. He’s an
actor that plays a gangster. The answer is Al… ..One, or O-N-E. Yes. Al One. Al Capone. That’s what I said, isn’t it? No, you said Al Cino. Al Ca… Al Ca… Al Cappuccino, you were thinking
of. You were thinking of Al Pacino. No, she’s thinking of Al Cappuccino.
Al Cappuccino! Ah! You’ll be delighted to hear this is the final question
in this round. I like this. It is… Yes, it is Scarlett. Tain. Is it tain? It is. APPLAUSE Two rounds to go. Let’s take a look at the leaderboard
going into those final two rounds. Gyles was leading at the beginning
of this one. Oh, look at… Not now… Scarlett! You’ve got nine points.
It’s still close, though. It is. We could all win. It is still
anyone’s game today and anyone’s game across the week,
as well. The next round is… How apt for the four of you, as
well. This is called The Nice Round for a simple reason. You’re all going to have to guess
the name of something… ..but you’ll do that with
your opponents all giving you a one-word clue to that TV show. If you get it right, you’ll score
a point, but you will also give a point to the person who gives
you the best clue – the person who has been
nicest to you. So, tablets out, everybody. ANGELLICA: Oh, OK. Scarlett, we will start with you.
Mm-hm. You’ve got to guess the name
of a TV show. It is written down on these cards, which your
opponents are all going to look at. So you’re all getting the same
TV show. You need to write down a one-word
clue to this TV show, please. So if you get the show right,
you get a point, but also you to give a point to the person
who gives you the most useful clue. That’s nice. Exactly, you see.
Yeah, I like it. You see where we get
the name from? Is everyone in? OK, Scarlett, you have to guess
a television show. You’re going to have three words to lead
you to that show and they will be provided by your opponents. Iain, what is Scarlett’s first
word? Dragons. And I also wrote “I love you”. Oh, that’s nice. Aw!
That’s nice. Angellica, what is your clue,
please? Stork is your clue. And Gyles. ANGELLICA: I think that’s wrong.
Historic. Historic.
So, dragons, stork and historic. Um… It can’t be Time Team,
because I’ve never seen any dragons in there, but that’s
historic. Tell you what, it’d hurry Tony Robertson along if a few
dragons showed up. Wouldn’t it just? Stork.
ANGELLICA: I’ve never… I wouldn’t go heavy on the stork. The only stork I can think
of is like when they bring babies. Yeah, I would just
probably ignore it. So, historic and dragons. Yeah. Er… The only thing I can think
of with dragons is Game of Thrones.
You going to go for that? Yeah.
Is that the right answer? Yay! The right answer, well done. Thank you. Brilliant. I’ve never watched it. It’s almost
a clue we wouldn’t allow, because we don’t have character names. But,
fortunately, Stark is the character name, not Stork. Oh, that’s it!
You got away with it. Scarlett, what gave that to you? If I’d just seen that, I would
have gone with Time Team. I’m so sorry, Gyles. I’m going to
give Iain the point. Iain, with dragons. I think
that’s absolutely right. Not just because we’re friends.
I do think that’s the best clue. I got it from dragons. Iain, you get
yourself a point there. Iain, and it’s now your turn to get
a television show. Great news. Your three opponents
are going to write down a one-word clue. Take that. Thank you. So you’re going to get three clues
to a television programme. Just a one-word clue, please. Gyles, Angellica and Scarlett,
you get a point if you give me a correct answer. You give a point
to the person who gives you the best clue.
Everybody got an answer? Yeah. You’re all in. Angellica,
what is the first word? Intelligent. Intelligent. Gyles, what is your word? Starter. Starter. Oh! And, Scarlett, what’s yours? Degrees. I definitely know
what this is. Degrees. What do you think it is? It’s a starter for ten – University Challenge. It must be. Is it
University Challenge? Yay! It is. Well done. Very nicely played. And who would you like to give
a point to? I think starter for ten
is a very famous phrase from that show, so I’ll have to say
Gyles. A point to Gyles. Very nicely done. But, really, I got
it from everyone’s. Yeah. Angellica, you’ve got to guess
a television programme now. Your three opponents will write
a one-word clue for you. There you go. Oh, I just tickled myself. I was so tempted just to write
the word “stork” and see what happened. OK. Angellica, you’ve got to guess
a television programme. You’ll have three words to help
you. Gyles, what is Angellica’s first word? Oil. Oil. Oil. Scarlett, what is Angellica’s
second word? Er, Texas. Texas. And Iain? Cowboys. Cowboys. What are you going to get
for, Angellica? WITH TEXAN ACCENT: I want
to go for Dallas. Is it Dallas? Yeah! Well done. Well done! Oil, Texas, cowboys. And who would
you like to give a point to there, Angellica? I got it from oil. So I’m going to give it to…
Another point for Gyles. I think you’re right.
The best clue. I think it was. A good round
for Gyles, this. And Gyles, it’s now your
turn to guess a show. Your three opponents are going
to write down a word here. Oh, it’s a tough one, clearly, if
you can’t… Yeah, it is, actually. Oh, please. If you could have
two words, it would be really good. Has everyone written down an answer? Yes. Scarlett,
what is the first word? Auctioning. Auctioning. Iain? Er, auction. Auction! And Angellica? Renovation. So something to do
with houses and building. It’s obviously one of those
programmes where they do up a house and then they sell it.
So they do up a house and then
they put it up for sale. Up For Grabs, er, Sale of the
Century, um… Your House Or Mine.
Can I have a guess? Yeah. I would have thought with
those two clues, the one show that combines them
both is Homes Under The Hammer. OTHERS: Yes!
Homes Under The Hammer. Well done if you said that at home.
I wouldn’t have got that. I should hand out a point, but they’re all
perfect clues. You know what, it’s the combination
of the two. I’m going to give all three
of you a point. Aw, yeah! Thanks. A nice way to end a nice
round. It’s been a nice week, as well. We have one round to go, ladies and gents.
One round before we give away our trophy. Shall we take
a little look at our leaderboard? Our leader, with 11 points,
is Scarlett Moffatt. But there’s five points between all
of you. Scarlett, you’ve got to do it for us
girls. It’s really, really close and the
weekly leaderboard was really, really close… Yeah. ..as well. So the trophy
can still go any way. Shall we play our final round?
ALL: Yes. OK. And it is… Fingers on buzzers for one
last time. A point for a correct answer, point
off for an incorrect answer. It is anyone’s to win. Your first
category… Pictures will be things found at
the circus. There’ll be a clue underneath. I
wish you all the very best of luck. Fingers on buzzers, here’s
your first one. Yes, Angellica. Tightrope Walking On Sunshine. It’s the correct answer, well done. Wow! Next clue… Yes, Iain. Big Toploader. Is that right? Big Toploader. Another point for
Iain Stirling. Well played. Next category… Those will be the pictures.
There’ll be a clue underneath. Yes, Iain. East 17 Again? Is that right? Yes, it is! It is. That’s so good.
East 17 and 17 Again. Next Christmas No 1 act and next
clue… Yes, Angellica.
Human League of Nations. It’s the right answer. Well done. Another point for Angellica.
Really great. Let’s have a look at another
Christmas No1 act and another clue… No-one going to risk it? ANGELLICA: Alexander Burke. It’s Alexandra Burke and Hare
is the answer. Well done if you said that at home. Alexandra Burke, Burke and Hare.
Here’s your next category… KLAXON BLARES No more time, no more categories. Who was won Friday’s
House Of Games? It is Scarlett Moffatt! ALL: Oh! Oh, my God! I was second place again! Iain, that’s your fourth
second place. Fourth second place. It’s been so close all week. It was close once again.
What a lovely end to a lovely week. So you win yourself another
prize, Scarlett. Aw. What are you going to take home? Um, it’s got to be the doll of
you, please. You’re taking home
the Richard Osman doll. Well done, congratulations. You take good care of him, OK?
I will, I promise. But we have one final matter
and it is this trophy. Somebody is about to win it. There can only be one winner. Who has won this week’s
House Of Games? It is… No way! Scarlett Moffatt is our champion! How is this happening?! Well done.
How has this happened? By three points. Amazing. I mean… Congratulations.
I mean, halfway through Monday, when you had no points at all, I did say, you know what? Sometimes
fortunes change. And I feel like… I hope people watching
this will see, literally, anything is possible. What a… What an inspiring speech
that is. A great way to end your Friday,
guys. Anything’s possible. Yeah. Our winner of House Of Games this
week, Scarlett Moffatt. CHEERING AND APPLAUSE Woo! Woo! Woo-woo-woo! Thank you so much. Been a pleasure
to be in your company all week. I really, really appreciate it.
Thank you for watching, as well. We’ll see you next
time on the House Of Games. See, Mam and Dad, this is genuine.
LAUGHTER I’ve really won. It’s not pretend.

2020 Will Be The NEW BEST Year For Nintendo Switch Games


Product Provided by Nintendo Every year on this channel we like to take
a moment to sit and reflect on the current status of Nintendo Switch and the games that
are available on the platform to discuss the direction we think it’s headed in as we
enter a new year. Specifically, around this time of the current
year because it’s right before holiday season really gets kicking and that’s the time
period that sets the tempo and I think it’s fun to get in ahead of that so we can try
to predict it’s impact. With all that being said, let’s talk about
it. Ok, so I get it, these videos have a real
risk of becoming a meme if they haven’t already, but, it’s true. I think it’s pretty easy to argue that Nintendo
Switch has gotten better and better every year in regards to its releases. Year 1 was a year of quality. Mario Odyssey and Breath of the Wild were
unmatched across all video game platforms in 2017 and it’d be hard to argue against
that claim when you look to their critical and commercial success. & even beyond those games, Splatoon 2, Mario
+ Rabbids, & Mario Kart 8 Deluxe all contributed to that amongst other games. 2018 was a more controversial year, but, I
honestly believe it bested 2017 because of the increased variety we got with more 3rd
parties joining the fray, & the fact that we got the 1st entries of several major Nintendo
franchises for Switch including Donkey Kong (some may say the best game in the series,)
Kirby (some – meaning me – may say is the worst in the series,) & obviously, Super Smash
Bros Ultimate, which speaks for itself and is currently still my favorite game on Switch
by a MILE! Pokemon Let’s Go was also great. THEN we have this year which started pretty
slow but around the mid point the game releases really picked up in quality and quantity with
highlights being Fire Emblem Three Houses, Super Mario Maker 2, Astral Chain, amongst
others with games like Luigi’s Mansion 3 & Pokemon Sword and Shield still to come and
that speaks nothing to the third party releases (many of which people swore up and down were
impossible like Overwatch and The Witcher 3.) EVEN STILL I think we have plenty of room
for improvement and that’s because what every year has had in common is that they’ve
all had a pretty well defined lull in major releases. For the last 2 years the lull was in the beginning
of the year. 2017 was a more rounded year but I’d say
the middle of the year was pretty light. In contrast with this, though – 2020 is coming
out swinging with Animal Crossing New Horizons, which, may not be the 1st game some think
of as a major release, but, it is easily a top 5 current Nintendo franchise as far as
sales go. This game will sell INCREDIBLY well likely
beating out Pokemon Let’s Go by the end of the year – possibly even Breath of the
Wild – in lifetime sales if the past mainline titles are any indication as well as the current
trend of Switch game releases setting franchise records left and right. & rightfully so because this game will be
something that lasts the life of the Switch as it’s an evergreen title that doesn’t
end. Fans of this franchise will play this game
for years to come in the same way that Smash Bros Ultimate is my most played game on a
monthly basis despite enjoying a lot of newer 2019 Switch games as well. I’m sure New Horizons will dominate other’s
playtime in the same way. If you’re one of those people, maybe leave
in the comments what you love about Animal Crossing, you could win someone over, you
never know – I digress. New Horizons specifically is making use of
the more capable hardware in the Switch as well as its improved online infrastructure
to improve on the already well known and beloved formula of Animal Crossing with the twist
of deserted island life. That’ll be March and there’s still more
to say about March in particular, but 1st, I’d be doing Nintendo Switch’s 2020 release
schedule an injustice if I didn’t mention the fact that the major releases ACTUALLY
start in January with the port of Tokyo Mirage Sessions Sharp FE Encore, which if you were
unaware and the title didn’t spell it out is a VERY Japanese game & since Atlus is dumb
is the closest thing you’ll get to a Persona game on Switch until Shin Megami Tensei 5
comes out, which, I’ll get to toward the end of the video. Despite its distinction of being a Wii U port,
Sharp FE is a game that is a great get for JRPG fans because no one who didn’t run
a Nintendo YouTube channel owned Wii U and the people that did said this game was pretty
solid judging by the 80 it scored on Metacritic. I’m sure it’ll benefit from the increased
hype for the Fire Emblem series garnered by Three Houses as well as the hype surrounding
the Persona series as that’s also receiving a new release in 2020, albeit, not on Switch…
really…. Yet…. Circling back to March (or likely a bit after
that since the Switch version apparently got pushed back,) though, we also now know we
can expect to be playing DOOM Eternal, which, is a promising game considering the reception
of its predecessor DOOM 2016. I could talk about why DOOM Eternal is exciting
apart from that, but, my friend Dan Cybert already did a way better job than I could
in his video about it so if you want to hear more about it, check that video out next. That said, moving on to the next major releases
that we know of so far is when we move into unknown territory as far as release dates
go starting with Xenoblade Chronicles Definitive Edition. This may be the 3rd time this game was released
(4th if you count the Wii U eShop) but it’s notable for a few reasons. 1. It sports models that are significantly improved
upon from the original Wii version, 2. It seems as if we’ll be seeing some cut
content being brought over to this version of the game so that’s a fun time & 3. It’s on a modern platform that everyone’s
playing during its prime. Wii was dying when it initially came to the
West in addition to the fact that the Wii wasn’t exactly the console people bought
to play sprawling JRPGs on in the 1st place, the 3DS port was only playable on New 3DS
& New 2DS models, which, are less prevalent by virtue of the fact that they came halfway
through that platform’s life, & like I mentioned before, no one owned Wii U… so yeah, basically
new game as far as most people are concerned. Xenoblade Chronicles is a high tier cult classic
so it’s sure to perform well and it could be elevated even more by the success of Switch. That brings me to No More Heroes 3, another
2020 Switch title – one that people have been waiting for – for nearly a decade. We don’t know too much about this one as
we only got a brief announcement trailer, but, we do know that it follows up Travis
Strikes Again. Finally we have a game that I KNOW people
are excited for because I’ve been told to play it’s predecessor for a long time now…. Unfortunately, I haven’t had the time BUT
PARKER – fellow Fanatix Four host – has so I forced him to come here and tell you why
Hollow Knight Silksong is an exciting addition to the 2020 lineup. & that’s just the games we know for sure
already, most years in gaming come into their own as we move through them. Many game of the year level games weren’t
revealed until we were already pretty far into the year they released in. So I wanna get into a bit of tinfoil hat territory. WHAT IF, The Pokemon Company continues with
the trend of releasing annual Pokemon titles and the NEXT ONE ends up being the Sinnoh
remakes that people want so bad in the Pokemon Sword & Shield engine. & to take things even FURTHER in tinfoil hat
territory, WHAT IF for these remakes they add another region to tie into the Pokemon
anime’s direction of traveling the Pokemon world. Geographically, the 1st 4 regions are relatively
close to one another so any of those could be fair game but we also know that planes
exist so they could even just opt to go with the All region since it’s likely they have
work done on HD models of that region. As many of you know, I could make a whole
video about JUST this, but, I’ll spare you the nitty gritty until that day comes – onto
the rest of 2020. There are quite a few pre announced games
that COULDD VERY WELL come out in 2020 – Shin Megami Tensei V is one of the last games announced
during the Switch reveal event that STILL has yet to come and I’m thinking more than
enough time has passed for a full dev cycle even if we assume they got ZERO work done
on the game before they announced it. Bayonetta 3 seems like a shoe in to me, I
feel like Platinum Games mostly avoided talking about it up until now to give Astral Chain
room to breathe. It’s had plenty of time by now so I’d
expect to see more about Bayo 3 in 2020 and I wouldn’t be surprised to see it released
then too. As for games we know about that I think will
be talked about in the 2021 video we’ll undoubtedly do, I could see the Breath of
the Wild sequel releasing in late 2020 if I’m being honest but it would be a major
surprise so I’ll go out on a limb and say that won’t end up happening and we’ll
get that game in 2021 or even 2021 because although it’s possible that having the original
Breath of the Wild as a foundation could mean the sequel will take less time to release
– we’re still talking about a Zelda game here. It would most likely get announced and later
delayed. If it weren’t for Mario Maker 2 I’d be
confident that we’d see a Mario Odyssey followup, but, I think next year would be
too soon considering that game’s release. MAYBE we’ll get a 3D World port, though. There’s NO way that Metroid Prime 4 will
see the light of day in 2020 – hell, I wouldn’t be surprised if we didn’t even see it in
2021 and that’s ok. Retro should take their time. Speaking of Retro, at this point I’m not
too sure we’ll see whatever they were working on in 2020 either UNLESS they were working
on a Prime Trilogy… that could potentially happen. Pikmin 4 is the white whale title that I don’t
know WHAT to think about. Miyamoto has said on several occasions that
it’s done or close to done but we have seen nothing from it and the timing of these statements
would suggest that he’s NOT talking about Hey Pikmin either. That said, I’m 50/50 on this showing up
in 2020 or not. Pikmin 4 will come like a thief in the night
for SURE. & now, on a related note, I wanna talk a bit about what I HOPE we see in 2020. I want this to be a year where Nintendo digs
even deeper into their pool of IP. Give me a new Ice Climber game. Give me a Kid Icarus Uprising sequel, give
me a Star Fox game that people don’t hate. I think Switch is in the perfect position
to elevate titles that underperformed in the past and I think 2020 would be a cool time
to find that out for sure with a lot of the tried and true franchises already being present
and accounted for. Regardless, 2020 already looks promising and
we’re going in relatively blind in comparison to these past few years of Switch’s existence. After all, it sort of has to be if they want
to keep their momentum going in the face of 2 new consoles being released. What games are you MOST exciting to play on
your Switch in 2020? & do you think it’ll become the best year for Switch releases? If not, which one is to you and why? As thanks for watching this full video I want
to announce that we’ll be holding a giveaway for a copy of the winner’s choice between
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The Truth About Guy’s Grocery Games Revealed


For a cooking show to stand out from the pack,
it really needs an angle — a host engineered for TV helps too — and Guy’s Grocery Games
combines multiple angles. Here’s what you don’t know about Guy Fieri’s
successful shopping and cooking show. If you’re a chef who wants to put their cooking
skills and creativity to the test on national TV by running around Flavortown to potentially
collect $20,000, be prepared to jump through a few hoops. Guy Fieri doesn’t just let anybody play his
grocery games, and producers of the show put contestants through a pretty rigorous vetting
process. Sometimes producers track particular chefs
down, and other times chefs reach out to the show. Keith Clinton, the chef de cuisine at Memphis’
Erling Jensen: The Restaurant, got a call while at work from the show’s producers. He told the Memphis Flyer: “They just called the restaurant and said,
‘I see you’re doing some interesting things on Instagram and Facebook. We’re just wondering who’s the chef there
and what’s going on.'” Chefs interested in being on the show are
asked to submit photos of their best dishes, and have several Skype and phone interviews
with the show’s producers. AJ, a New Jersey firefighter who went up against
other firefighters on the show, recalled: “While it was a long process, it was totally
worth it in the end.” The one thing contestants won’t be required
to do during the casting process is come up with a signature catchphrase, contestant Tracey
Shepos Cenami told Delish. They leave that TV magic to Fieri. Being a contestant on Guy’s Grocery Games
and walking away with a wad of cash is a major win, but being a judge isn’t too shabby either. Judge Melissa d’Arabian says that filming
the show is basically, quote, “like going to summer camp,” only with way better food. Judges are made welcome by Fieri before they
even step on the set, and the Grocery Games host makes sure to include a little flavor
from his hometown and show filming location of Santa Rosa, California. Judge Brandi Milloy told PopSugar about her
first experience as a judge: “When I arrived to my hotel, there was a handwritten
note from Guy with wine and a basket of fruit welcoming me to the show. I get chills just thinking about it. Talk about feeling welcome!” The show’s coordinators also make sure to
pamper the judges when they arrive on set by stocking their trailers with their favorite
foods. Milloy said that she casually mentioned her
liking of gummy bears and when she showed up there were all sorts of gummy bear varieties
waiting for her. When you consider the opportunity to eat meals
prepared by creative chefs and a personal trailer with all of your favorite foods, being
a judge on the show sounds almost as good as winning Grocery Games. Guy’s Grocery Games is all about speed. From being able to fire off fast answers during
the show’s “Culinary Quiz” game to running around the store for ingredients to whipping
up the dish, contestants have to move fast. When it comes down to it, contestants actually
spend very little time over the burner cooking. Factor in the lengthy shooting days, and actually
cooking is just a small part of the experience. A single episode can take up to 12 hours to
shoot. Those who aren’t early birds need not apply,
because the day begins as early as 5 a.m., former contestant DeAnna Germano told Syracuse.com. The three rounds each consist of 30 minutes,
so the chefs are cooking for only about an hour and a half. So what do the other 10 and a half hours of
the day look like? At lot of it is waiting around for the judging
process and conducting interviews with the producers to relay to show what sort of pressure
the chef’s are under. Tracey Shepos Cenami said, “After you compete, you sit down and do interviews,
which can last two or three hours.” Cooking up a tasty meal becomes a lot trickier
when you’re forced to only use ingredients that come from a can. “What? We can only use canned food, frozen food and
we can only use seven items? Ugh, God.” What separates Guy’s Grocery Games from similar
cooking shows is the little bit of control over the ingredients contestants have. The games portion of the show really tests
the culinary prowess of the chefs and often results in some creative dishes. Take the “ABC game,” for example. Contestants are tasked with cooking up a meal
where every ingredient must start with the same one or two letters. Judge G. Garvin said, “I love the possibility of pulling out a letter
that could really throw you but makes you think about what you really get.” Other games might force competitors to shop
using tiny bags instead of carts or bowl over bottles to ensure they don’t have to use undesirable
ingredients. These games really force the contestants to
think outside the box. Judge Beau MacMillan told Food Network: “It’s just amazing because the beauty of being
a chef is the ability, I think, to really adapt and overcome, and when you’ve set your
mind to something, chefs commit to that.” A big part of what makes Guy’s Grocery Games
work is the fantastic set. The man behind that creation is set designer
Scott Storey. Storey has been designing TV sets for several
decades now. Reality Blurred reports that besides Grocery
Games, he’s created sets for the shows Big Brother and RuPaul’s Drag Race. A similar show that older Guy’s Grocery Games
fans might remember is the now-defunct game show Supermarket Sweep. Storey was the set mastermind on that, too. But the set of Supermarket Sweep wasn’t as
sophisticated as Grocery Games. Storey recalled: “Buying fake meat was too expensive. So the production company would just buy real
meat. It would sit there, unrefrigerated, for a
week […] Everything was just rotten, because there’s no refrigeration. It’s just scenery.” Storey knew that he didn’t want that to be
the case when designing the set for Guy’s Grocery Games. He only had four weeks to build the set and
vendors told him it couldn’t be done, but he not only succeeded in creating a near perfect
replica of a functioning grocery store, but did it so well that even food vendors were
fooled. Once, a potato chip delivery guy showed up
to the set and couldn’t help but marvel at the set before remarking, “No one will shop here. There’s no parking.” The chefs who appear on the show and the judges
that ultimately decide a contestant’s fate say that Guy Fieri is genuinely excited about
each chef who appears. DeAnna Germano told Syracuse.com that her
interactions with Fieri were a great experience, and described him as not just down-to-earth
but more “chef-like” than people might give him credit for. Former contestant Tracey Shepos Cenami had
a lot of praise for not only Fieri’s welcoming manner, but how helpful the host was to her
and the other chefs. She told Delish: “Before the show, Guy gathered the contestants
to remind us we’re there to have fun and to show the world who we are as chefs […] His
role, if you take advantage of it, is to help you in certain ways… I think I asked him to open up a jar!” The helpful advice — and hands — that
Fieri lends to the contestants are all part of him, quote, “sincerely wanting each person
to do their absolute best,” Grocery Games judge Brandi Milloy told PopSugar. How does one prepare themselves for the onslaught
of shopping challenges that await them on Guy’s Grocery Games? Well, aside from running around a local supermarket
with a stopwatch, preparation is futile. Fieri explained that it’s not only the pressure
of the TV lights and cameras, but the “trials and tribulations” of the show can really wreak
havoc on a contestant. Fieri said such challenges such as cooking
steak and potatoes using only frozen foods really throw a chef off their game: “For a lot of chefs, including myself, I wouldn’t
know what to go get out of the frozen foods section and make steak and potatoes. You can’t just get a Swanson Hungry Man and
cook it up and go ‘steak and potatoes.'” Grocery Games winner Lindsay Porter told the
Edmonton Journal that she had to prepare a noodle dish using frozen chicken-fried steak
and said the challenge “…was absolutely awful, probably one of
the worst things I’ve dealt with.” While being a highly-capable chef is always
part of the winning formula, going into the game with a plan just isn’t possible. Two-time winner Nicholas Moulton told The
Berkshire Eagle, “You can’t really plan what you do. You have to completely blank out everything
because you don’t know what they’re going to ask you to do.” Fieri often sees contestants fall victim to
the same mistakes, and some of those mistakes are the same ones that trip contestants up
on other cooking shows. “I just wish she had transformed the candy
cigarette, because she just stuck it in the ice cream.” “Yeah, along with some real cigarettes.” Fieri told Food Network that he sees chefs
routinely get eliminated for things like poor seasoning or adding frivolous garnishes that
work against the main dish. Arguably one of the biggest mistakes that
can sink contestants is playing it too safe. Using your imagination and being open to completely
challenge what defines a dish is a survival skill that both Fieri and winning chef Tracey
Shepos Cenami agree on. Cenami told The Daily Meal, “You have to make quick culinary decisions
and commit to an idea and then execute that idea with little or no time or opportunity
to change it.” Guy’s Grocery Games made its TV debut in an
actual working grocery store. The original location of Flavortown was Fields
Market in West Hills, California, which carried an impressive 25,000 different items for contestants
to use North Bay Business Journal reports. However, by the end of the first season, the
show was in need of a new home closer to Fieri’s home base. The production company took over a massive
industrial area in Santa Rosa, California, and built a 15,000-square-foot grocery store
that has all the bells and whistles a chef could want. Fieri said, “The aisles are wider, the lighting is better,
so it makes it easier for the chefs to shop and see what’s on the shelves. Going along with the shelves, the culinary
team has stocked and set them up so they’re far more shopper-friendly. The set does have 5,000 items fewer than the
original Fields Market location, but it has larger kitchens that were built to mimic the
feel of a commercial kitchen. An added perk is that chefs can also run over
to “equipment row” for any tool that they might need that’s not already in their station. “Every single item you could want as a chef
most likely will be here.” The food at Flavortown supermarket is logged
and barcoded in the same way as it would be at any real grocery store, according to set
designer Scott Storey. But there are some minor differences from
a working supermarket in Flavortown. While there are checkout lanes, shoppers on
the Guy’s Grocery Games set won’t find any aisles with pet food and Storey notes “there’s
no baby care section.” The Flavortown supermarket’s shelves also
differ from those you’d find in a regular store. The shelves themselves have lights attached
to them to make things easier for the crew. Storey said this is primarily, quote, “because
the contestants stand looking at the shelves, you can’t light them, so we built lighting
into all the shelves.” Flavortown may have an impressive selection
of food, but what happens to all that food after the show? The chefs on Guy’s Grocery Games don’t even
come close to making a dent in the store’s massive food selection over the course of
an episode, and thankfully, it doesn’t go in a dumpster out back. Moving the show’s shooting location to Santa
Rosa was a blessing for the community because all of that food finds its way to different
food programs in the area. Just like a normal grocery store, staff comb
through the aisles each week to mark what food has been damaged or could be nearing
the end of its shelf life. At the end of the season, non-perishables
are simply covered with plastic until shooting picks back up. The selected items are then pulled and divided
up to go to different food programs in the community. Food that’s not fit for human consumption
often finds its way to farms to be fed to livestock. In total, Food Network says nearly 30,000
pounds of food ends up being donated every season. Check out one of our newest videos right here! Plus, even more Mashed videos about your favorite
cooking shows are coming soon. Subscribe to our YouTube channel and hit the
bell so you don’t miss a single one.

Why NBA Players Out Earn Other US Athletes

October 17, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 100 Comments

Why NBA Players Out Earn Other US Athletes


It seems like every year pro athletes in
the NFL, NBA and MLB are signing new record breaking deals, but not
all athletes are pulling in big contracts. In fact, a lot of one
athlete will earn over his career depends to a surprising degree on
the league they play in. The National Football League had some
of the flashiest contracts in 2019. That makes sense, since the NFL is
one of the biggest and most profitable sports leagues in the U.S. But on average, it’s not paying its players
nearly as much as those in the MLB and the NBA. There are three big reasons why NFL
players make less on average league structure, salary caps and
guaranteed money for players. As for the NBA, well, their
players have an especially good. In addition to having a higher average
pay per player, they also make more money off the court than their
peers in the NFL and MLB. That’s partly because NBA players have a
bigger fan base outside of the U.S. as of 2019. It’s the second most popular
sport in the world. NBA star LeBron James land won
the biggest endorsement deals ever with Nike. That could pay him one
billion dollars over his lifetime. So why do players in America’s
three biggest sports leagues make wildly different salaries in order
to answer that? First, we have to understand
how sports contracts work. Player contracts are partly based on
how a specific league is structured. The number of games in the season. The number of teams in a league and
the number of players on a team. NFL teams have 53 players on an active
roster, the MLB has 25, and the NBA has 15. The NFL season is
the shortest of the three. There are 32 teams that play
16 games throughout the regular season. In total, there are
256 games played collectively. The NBA has 30 teams across its league
that play 82 games in the season, bringing the total amount of
games played to 1,230. Then there’s the MLB, which has the
most amount of games played of the three leagues during
its regular season. There are 30 MLB teams that play 162
games in a season totaling to 2,430 games played collectively. Even though teams across all three
leagues tend to prioritize their spending on star players in terms of
average salary per player, the NFL ranks dead last out of the three. A lot of it boils down to basic math. The NFL plays the least number of games
in a season and and employs the greatest number of players. There are 1,696 active
players in the NFL. In the MLB, there are 877. And for the NBA there’s 439. Then there’s the number of teams. Every league has a common pool of
cash that is divvied up among teams every season. The more teams there are,
the smaller the cut of the pie. The size of the cash pool has a
lot to do with the TV broadcasting field signed by each league. Ironically, more games doesn’t directly translate
to bigger TV rights for leagues. So when you take a look at
the data that we look at, you know, the NFL has the highest percentage
of avid fans across the world. Call the big four, which is the three
other stick and ball leagues next to the NFL. Their fan base is massive. It’s almost it’s almost
half of the U.S. population sort of reports some
interest in the NFL. The length of season thing is actually
kind of interesting because if you think about it, scarcity of games. Right, could potentially work
in the NFL favor. There’s just a concentrated level of
interest across a shorter number of games. Each year, the NFL
receives an estimated 6.5 billion dollars. The NBA
gets an estimated 2.6 billion dollars and the MLB
makes an estimated 1.9 billion dollars. And so the players receive
today 51 cents out of every dollar. And that is 51 cents out
of the entire 8 billion dollar franchise. That is the NBA Enterprise. That is the NBA. And that
certainly does include the broadcast agreements, the local agreements, the national
agreements, digital international on any type of broadcast agreement is
included in our overall cool of basketball related income. 51 cents of it is delivered to
the players through the vehicle of our salary cap slash luxury tax system. But player pay isn’t
all about league structure. It also has a whole lot to do with
how well a player performs for a team and the rules. Each league
sets through the collective bargaining agreement with player unions. Every league has its own set of rules
around how it decides to pay its players. It’s called a
collective bargaining agreement. The CBA is a set agreed terms
made by the league’s players association and the league itself. It covers everything
from the number of games, rookie wages, practice requirements, health
care and player contracts. Each league has its own CBA and in
turn, each league has a different set of standards of how
player contracts work. One core component of the CBA
is something known as revenue sharing. Every league has a common pool of
cash that split among teams and players each season. The bulk some of that
money comes from television and media rights deals. Another key component of
the CBA is the salary cap. It is the total amount of money each
team in the league is allowed to spend on player salaries. In 2019, the NBA salary
cap was set to 109.14 million dollars. The NFL salary cap was set to 188.2 million dollars. And the MLB technically
doesn’t have a salary cap. They have a tax system in place
but we’ll get back to that. The salary cap helps create competitive
balance among teams because it prevents, richer teams from signing
all the best players. The NFL has a hard cap, meaning that
teams in the league can’t go over the salary cap no matter what. The NBA is a little bit more lax. It has a soft cap. The league issues a base salary cap
number, which teams can go over as long as they pay a luxury tax. But there’s a limit to how much a
team can go over that soft cap. You are able to exceed it
for a variety of reasons. You’re able to exceed it
to resign your players. That’s the Larry Bird exception. You’re able to sign a player
off the market, a free agent. Under the mid-level exception, you’re able
to trade for players who will bring you higher over the salary
cap under the assigned player exception. So we have a lot of exceptions to
the cap and it keeps it soft. And that encourages owners and teams to
give guarantees, to give long term goals and encourages them to be able
to give generous deals and not necessarily. Choose between one
player or another. Luxury tax limit helps prevent bigger
teams and bigger markets like New York and Chicago from
overspending on players. And so we agreed to put in place
this luxury tax back in 1999 following our six month lockout so that if
you exceed that tax threshold, which is usually about 20 million dollars over the
cap, that’s about where it is right now. Then you’re going to
have to pay for it. You can do it, but you have to pay. And the tax is pretty significant. It’s more it used to be dollar for
dollar and now it’s more than dollar for dollar. And it allows those teams to
feel as if they really need to go. They have a window. They’re going to take Iran.
They’re able to do it. They’re able to pay that tax
and still take these players. As for the MLB, they have something
similar to the NBA soft salary cap, but it works a bit differently. Historically, the MLB has always seen
big payroll disparities between big market teams and small market teams. In 2003, the MLB CBA implemented a
luxury tax similar to the NBA soft salary cap. It’s called
the competitive balance tax. MLB teams that exceed the predetermined
payroll threshold are subject to this tax. Unlike the NBA,
there’s no luxury tax limit. So a team can pay over as much as
they want, as long as they pay the taxes and are okay with facing league
penalties like lower draft picks. For 15 years the New York Yankees
weren’t too concerned with the payroll threshold or loss of draft picks. The team paid over 341 million dollars
in tax penalties alone from 2003 to 2017. Another very important part of
the league, CBA, is guaranteed contracts. A fully guaranteed contract ensures
a player will receive the full value of their
contract no matter what. Unlike the MLB and NBA, not all
contracts in the NFL are fully guaranteed. Even though on paper, NFL players
sign big flashy contracts, that doesn’t mean they’ll see all the
money they’ve been promised. Unlike the NBA and MLB, guaranteed contracts
aren’t really a thing in the NFL. Take the
Oakland Raiders quarterback. Dereck Carr’s contract is a five
year 125 million dollar contract. Of that 125 million dollars, little
bit over 70 million dollars is guaranteed. Compare that to the
MLB as Yu Darvish. The pitchers contract is a six year,
126 million dollar contract that is fully guaranteed. That means no matter
what happens to him, he’s taking home all 126 million dollars. Generally speaking, across all three
leagues, there are basically two kinds of contracts, rookie
and veteran contracts. Once a player completes their rookie deal,
they can renegotiate for a new contract as a free agent for the NFL. Most first round rookies in franchise
tag players have fully guaranteed contracts. If you’re looking at a
big time like quarterback or wide receiver guys, you’re looking at five
year, sometimes six year contracts. And the first two to three years
on those contracts could be potentially fully guaranteed. But pass that you get
in an area where the only thing protecting that player against being
released is a pro-rated signing bonus. So signing bonuses, so you have
a 20 million dollar signing bonus, the preparation, which you think an
accounting tool for the salary cap where that 20 million
is divided by five. If it’s a five year contract or even
if it’s a six year contract, only prorated contract over five. So other than first round rookies
in franchise tagged players, there are no regulations forcing a team to
guaranteed every single dollar on a player’s contract. Of all veteran contracts in
the NFL, only 13 have fully guaranteed contracts. Five of those contracts are worth over
10 million dollars and only one contract is for more than one year. Despite the NFL being famous for
not paying their players contracts in full, the MLB and NBA are known
to have massive contracts with hundreds of million dollars. They’re
100 percent guaranteed. MLB contracts are pretty straightforward
since they are fully guaranteed. The value of the contract is
typically divided evenly through the contracts length. So let’s say you and
the team don’t agree on the number you’re going to come up with one
number in your agent or whatever. The team with another number
based on Rosa Autistics. It’s not like you’re gonna be
at 100 made a difference. So it’s gonna be based on
a good, good amount of statistics. And then with that they own the team
could either accept the team or deny they go to arbitration. So it’s like
a panel and the panel goes and discusses after February, I believe. And then with that, they either pick the
teams or they pick yours it’s not in between or anything. So they kind of based on the statistics
of other players at your level in the league and they’re going to
pick one or the other. So it’s how you put yourself in
a position to probably get a higher contract or you’re going to
get some of the worst. Nba contracts are very similar
to them obese contracts. The Golden State Warriors player Steph
Curry signed a five year 201.2 million dollar contract in 2017, meaning
that he makes over 40 million dollars each year. So even if he
gets injured, Curry is still taking home 40 million dollars. Another key difference is that some NBA
players can make even more money off the court in 2018. Three of the top 10 athletes in
the world with the highest earnings from endorsement deals were NBA players. No player in the top 10
played for the NFL or MLB. Endorsement deals are huge
for NBA stars. It allows them to make a steady
flow of cash outside of their contracts. Players can sign endorsement deals with
pretty much any company and these deals can prove to
be very profitable. Well, after a player
retires, take Shaquille O’Neal. He retired back in 2011. Please continue to lend
multi-million dollar brand deals. Since then, brand endorsement deals have
tend to favorite NBA athletes because basketball has more of an
international reach than baseball and football. And NBA stars have a
huge following on social media. As for the MLB, Mike Trout has
the highest paying contract in baseball history, worth over 426
dollars over 12 years. Trow also makes an estimated 2.5 million dollars from
endorsement deals. Compare that to NBA
star Kevin Durant. D has a four year 164 million
dollar contract with the Brooklyn Nets. But when you count in sponsorship
dollars, the pay divide is bigger. In 2014, Durant signed a 10 year
deal with Nike worth an estimated three hundred million dollars. And sneaker deals are
huge for NBA stars. LeBron James annual income from his
sneaker deal is worth 32 million dollars a year. For comparison, back
in 2017, Odell Beckham Junior signed the biggest sneaker deal in the NFL,
worth 25 million dollars over five years. So LeBron just went looked
at his personal Instagram account. His most recent post is a picture of
one of his Nike pairs of sneakers. So really strong promotion quality. It’s a product placement thing, single
use of a hashtag or mentioned. And it generated about 1.6 million total. Interactions
on that post. So because of the quality of the
promotion and level of engagement that it’s getting. It could be worth anywhere
from 500 thousand to about 1 million dollars in an adjusted add
value based on the quality that promotion and engagement
that it generated. And LeBron James has a lifetime endorsement
deal with Nike worth a rumored 1 billion dollars over time. The super max contract is unique to the
NBA and it’s one of the biggest contracts in sports. Players like Steph Curry and Russell
Westbrook have super max deals over 200 million dollars. It essentially boils down to this. It’s a way for teams to extend players
who have been in the league for seven to nine years to a
four or five year contract. The super max contract is valued up to
35 percent of the salary cap for that year. It begins. And then there’s
an 8 percent increase in salary, which is tacked on to each of
the subsequent years of the contract. Super max contracts were
introduced in 2017. It was the league’s solution to the
problem of players upgrading to bigger market teams or winning teams. These contracts were designed to incentivize
star players to stay put with the teams that drafted them. But before a player qualifies for
200 million dollars super max contract. They must meet a
laundry list of requirements. Plus, players need to receive high
performance accolades and two of their most recent seasons or be named the
MVP of any of the three previous seasons. Klay Thompson missed out on being
part of the all NBA team and was ineligible to get
a supermax deal. Players who have signed super max
deals are often huge financial burdens on a team and can cripple the
team’s ability to sign or reassign talent. If you make it so that one star takes
up a larger part and it’s going to be harder for you to be able to go
out and fit in two or three star players. And so absolutely, I
would say that you more salary that you’re paying to any
individual player, the harder it’s going to be to attract other players,
because usually when you attract stars, you’re doing it using room under the
salary cap and less room, you have less ability. You have to go out to
the market and bring in more players. Essentially, if a team decides to offer
a super max contract, it can take up to a third of the team’s
salary cap space for that season, leaving roughly two thirds of the team’s salary
cap space to be distributed among 14 other players. So far, only five players have signed
super max deals, so time will tell if super max contracts
are here to stay. So what does the future
hold for sports contracts? It all depends on the changes that
are being made and implemented by each league’s collective
bargaining agreement. Just take the NFL. It’s the most profitable league compared to
the MLB and NBA, but its players are not seeing the
same guarantees as those leagues. But new changes are about to be made
with the NFL CBA that’s set to expire at the end of the 2020 season. The NFL Players Association and the NFL
teams are working to establish a new CBA for the 2021 season. For most the last 10 weeks, about
every Monday or Tuesday I’ve been in Chicago, are a park nearby. Negotiating with the Players Association
about our future labor agreement. The MLB CBA is also set to expire
in 2021, which can see changes like adjustments to the
competitive balance tax. As for the NBA, the league reached an
agreement on the CBA back in 2017. The deal will continue through the 2023
to 2024 season through a lockout for six months in 1998. There was no basketball until
February of that year. We were locked out again in 2011. There was no basketball
until Christmas Day. And so we’ve certainly demonstrated that,
you know, we’re going to fight for what’s right. We have
the ability and the wherewithal. I think it’s expected that we’re going
to stand up and exert whatever leverage and ability we have.

Pixar: The math behind the movies – Tony DeRose


At Pixar, we’re all about telling stories, but one story that hasn’t been told very much is the huge degree to which math is used in the production of our films. The math that you’re learning in middle school and high school is used all the time at Pixar. So, let’s start with a very simple example. Anybody recognize this guy? (Cheers) Yeah, so this is Woody from Toy Story, and let’s ask Woody to, say, walk across the stage from, say, left to right, just like that. So, believe it or not, you just saw a ton of mathematics. Where is it? Well, to explain that, it’s important to understand that artists and designers think in terms of shape and images but computers think in terms of numbers and equations. So, to bridge those two worlds we use a mathematical concept called coordinate geometry, right? That is, we lay down a coordinate system with x describing how far something is to the right and y describing how high something is. So, with these coordinates we can describe where Woody is at any instant in time. For instance, if we know the coordinates of the lower left corner of that image, then we know where the rest of the image is. And in that little sliding animation we saw a second ago, that motion we call translation, the x coordinate started with a value of one, and it ended with a value of about five. So, if we want to write that in mathematics, we see that the x at the end is four bigger than x at the start. So, in other words, the mathematics of translation is addition. Alright? How about scaling? That is making something bigger or smaller. Any guesses as to what the mathematics of scaling might be? Dilation, multiplication, exactly. If you’re going to make something twice as big, you need to mulitply the x and the y coordinates all by two. So, this shows us that the mathematics of scaling is mulitiplication. Okay? How about this one? How about rotation? Alright, spinning around. The mathematics of rotation is trigonometry. So, here’s an equation that expresses that. It looks a little scary at first. You’ll probably get this in eighth or ninth grade. If you find yourselves sitting in trigonometry class wondering when you’re ever going to need this stuff, just remember that any time you see anything rotate in one of our films, there’s trigonometry at work underneath. I first fell in love with mathematics in seventh grade. Any seventh graders? A few of you? Yeah. My seventh grade science teacher showed me how to use trigonometry to compute how high the rockets that I was building was going. I just thought that was amazing, and I’ve been enamored with math ever since. So, this is kind of old mathematics. Mathematics that’s been known and, you know, developed by the old dead Greek guys. And there’s a myth out there that all the interesting mathematics has already been figured out, in fact all of mathematics has been figured out. But the real story is that new mathematics is being created all the time. And some of it is being created at Pixar. So, I’d like to give you an example of that. So, here are some characters from some of our early films: Finding Nemo, Monsters Inc. and Toy Story 2. Anybody know who the blue character in the upper left is? It’s Dory. Okay, that was easy. Here’s a little harder one. Anybody know who’s the character in the lower right? Al McWhiggin from Al’s Toy Barn, exactly. The thing to notice about these characters is they’re really complicated. Those shapes are really complicated. In fact, the toy cleaner, I have an example, the toy cleaner there in the middle, here’s his hand. You can imagine how fun it was to bring this through airport security. His hand is a really complicated shape. It’s not just a bunch of spheres and cylinders stuck together, right? And not only is it complicated, but it has to move in complicated ways. So, I’d like to tell you how we do that, and to do that I need to tell you about midpoints. So, here’s a couple of points, A and B, and the line segment between them. We’re going to start out first in two dimensions. The midpoint, M, is the point that splits that line segment in the middle, right? So, that’s the geometry. To make equations and numbers, we again introduce a coordinate system, and if we know the coordinates of A and B, we can easily compute the coordinates of M just by averaging. You now know enough to work at Pixar. Let me show you. So, I’m going to do something slightly terrifying and move to a live demo here. So, what I have is a four-point polygon here, and it’s going to be my job to make a smooth curve out of this thing. And I’m going to do it just using the idea of midpoints. So, the first thing I’m going to do is an operation I’ll call split, which adds midpoints to all those edges. So, I went from four points to eight points, but it’s no smoother. I’m going to make it a little bit smoother by moving all of these points from where they are now to the midpoint of their clockwise neighbor. So, let me animate that for you. I’m going to call that the averaging step. So, now I’ve got eight points, they’re a little bit smoother, my job is to make a smooth curve, so what do I do? Do it again. Split and average. So, now I’ve got sixteen points. I’m going to put those two steps, split and average, together into something I’ll call subdivide, which just means split and then average. So, now I’ve got 32 points. If that’s not smooth enough, I’ll do more. I’ll get 64 points. Do you see a smooth curve appearing here from those original points? And that’s how we create the shapes of our charcters. But remember, I said a moment ago it’s not enough just to know the static shape, the fixed shape. We need to animate it. And to animate these curves, the cool thing about subdivision. Did you see the aliens in Toy Story? You know that sound they make, “Ooh”? Ready? So, the way we animate these curves is simply by animating the original four points. “Ooh.” Alright, I think that’s pretty cool, and if you don’t, the door is there, it doesn’t get any better than that, so. This idea of splitting and averaging also holds for surfaces. So, I’ll split, and I’ll average. I’ll split, and I’ll average. Put those together into subdivide, and this how we actually create the shapes of all of our surface characters in three dimensions. So, this idea of subdivision was first used in a short film in 1997 called Geri’s Game. And Geri actually made a cameo apperance in Toy Story 2 as the toy cleaner. Each of his hands was the first time we ever used subdivision. So, each hand was a subdivision surface, his face was a subdivision surface, so was his jacket. Here’s Geri’s hand before subdivision, and here’s Geri’s hand after subdivision, so subdivision just goes in and smooths out all those facets, and creates the beautiful surfaces that you see on the screen and in the theaters. Since that time, we’ve built all of our characters this way. So, here’s Merida, the lead character from Brave. Her dress was a subdivision surface, her hands, her face. The faces and hands of all the clansman were subdivision surfaces. Today we’ve seen how addition, multiplication, trigonometry and geometry play a roll in our films. Given a little more time, I could show you how linear algebra, differential calculus, integral calculus also play a roll. The main thing I want you to go away with today is to just remember that all the math that you’re learning in high school and actually up through sophomore college we use all the time, everyday, at Pixar. Thanks.