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Sega GAME GEAR Buying Guide & Fun Games

October 18, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 100 Comments

Sega GAME GEAR Buying Guide & Fun Games


Metal Jesus: Metal Jesus here and I’m back
again with Kinsey. Kinsey: Hello and today we are going to be
talking about a buying guide for the Sega Game Gear. Metal Jesus: And you are perfect for this
video because you had one as a kid, right? Kinsey: Yep. That was pretty much my go to
hand held as a kid because it was color screen and I’m like, “Yeah, this is awesome.” Metal Jesus: Well and we’re going to be doing
this video because we get a lot of requests for it. I think there’s a lot of mystery around
the Game Gear. So we’re going to talk bout the hardware, what you need to look out for,
as well as the variants, the accessories and we’re going to recommend some games you get
day one. Let’s take a look. Kinsey: So first, we’re going to talk about
the hardware and the Game Gear is actually pretty special for the time because it was
back lit and color. Metal Jesus: Which is really important compared
to the original Game Boy, which was what, black and white or? Kinsey: Green. Metal Jesus: Green and yellow. Yeah, so Sega
was attempting to do some thing kind of forward thinking and bring color to the handheld.
Now actually to be fair, the Atari Lynx did it first, but this was another answer to that
and for the most part, when this came out that was a huge selling point. Kinsey: Yeah, yeah. It was amazing. When I
first saw this at the store, I was like, “That’s the one I want.” Metal Jesus: Now some of the other things
I like about the Game Gear is that I think it’s really comfortable to hold. I like how
it’s wide, almost like a P-S-P, or something like that. It’s really comfortable even today. Kinsey: It’s really, really nice. Metal Jesus: Yeah. You know, on the original
Game Boy I’d have to go like this to platy stuff. So I definitely prefer that. Now as
far as collecting goes, one of the really great things about the Game Gear as well,
is that there are over 300 games made for it and if you get an adapter, you can also
play most Master System games with it because I thinks it’s similar technology, or similar… Kinsey: The Game Gear is basically a repackaged
Master System, so it’s basically the same tech, just in a cuter package. Metal Jesus: Yeah and a lot of people, especially
in North America, didn’t really get into collecting for the Master System. So this is an option
for people. Kinsey: Yeah. Metal Jesus: And most of the games are dirt
cheap. Kinsey: Yeah. Now I get really surprised when
I’m like, “Oh, that Game Gear game’s $25.” Metal Jesus: Right, right. Yeah to give you
an idea, the most expensive game, I think, is Panzer Dragoon Mini and that’s by far the
most expensive one. I think it’s like a hundred bucks. Kinsey: Yeah, it’s like a hundred bucks. Metal Jesus: Yeah, but these go down from
there and most of them are literally a dollar, five bucks, ten bucks, something like that. Kinsey: Yeah it’s basically the Panzer Dragoon
and Mortal Kombat 3 are the really expensive ones. Metal Jesus: Yeah there’s a couple of them,
but not many. So it’s very easy to collect for, which is what I like and actually that’s
what I do, is when I go out, if I see a Game Gear game, I don’t own, I’ll be like, “Sure,
why not.” Kinsey: $3, $1, yes. Metal Jesus: So that’s kind of some of the
positives. Now, there are some negatives and we talked about the screen and while Sega
was trying to do something really far advanced, the thing is that screen technology on a hand
held just sucked batteries. Kinsey: Yeah. Metal Jesus: And so, unfortunately, this will
cook through six AA batteries in no time. Kinsey: Yeah, when I was little, I tried to
take one on a road trip. There was a lot of gas station batteries I went through. Metal Jesus: That’s so funny. The other thing
about it is that unfortunately, some of the capacitors that were used in this fail a lot
and so it’s unusual to find a perfectly working Game Gear unfortunately. As a matter of fact,
my first Game Gear, the screen was funky, they had no sound. Kinsey: Got to wear headphones and lean it
weird and you’re like, “Alright, this I can now do.” Metal Jesus: Yeah. But one of the good things
is and some of you watching this may have noticed, that this is a little bit unusual,
this one right here. So this is modded and there’s a bunch of people out there who mod
these. As a matter of fact, a guy named Marco did this. He’s part of, I think, the AtariAge
Forum and actually what he did, is he replaced the screen on here with an LCD screen, super
bright, and it’s shockingly better. So we’ll actually compare them in a second here. He
also replaced a lot of the capacitors for the sound, which is really nice of him to
do that and it also has V-G-A out. Kinsey: That’s so awesome. Metal Jesus: Yes. So this is really cool.
So basically, if you use the brightness over here, you can either set it to be on the handheld
or you can send it out to your TV or your computer monitor. Kinsey: Oh, that’s awesome. Metal Jesus: It changes it completely. If
someone is going to start collecting Game Gear now, because the screen is kind of one
of the bummers, it’s really hard to go and buy one of these today and have to deal with
that screen. So getting a new screen on there is like it’s night and day. Kinsey: Yeah, it’s bringing new life to the
Game Gear, which is awesome because there’s great games for it. It get’s over looked a
lot. Metal Jesus: Yeah, definitely. Now there are
a lot of accessories, so let’s talk about that next. Alright, so we were talking about
the terrible battery life of the Game Gear, but there are other solutions, right? Kinsey: We can get you a one of a kind chick
magnet. You can wear this baby on your belt. Metal Jesus: When you first mentioned this
I was like, “What the hell are you talking about? Oh, right.” You seen a fanny pack. Kinsey: With my Game Gear fanny pack and my
Game Gear battery pack. I just need a Game Gear hat. Metal Jesus: I’m surprised you don’t have
one. Kinsey: I wish I did. Metal Jesus: But this is a rechargeable Game
Gear battery pack. It’s actually cool. Kinsey: Yeah and it really helps extend the
life of your battery and you’re not always going to get more AA’s. Metal Jesus: I know. Just to do this video
I sent Rebecca, my wife, to go to Target to buy a bunch of batteries just so we would
have them. It’s ridiculous, right? But so it’s nice that this is here and the other
thing too is that you can use a Genesis power adapter as well. Kinsey: Yeah, for the Genesis 2, I actually
did that a lot when I was little. I just sat by the wall and played my Game Gear. Metal Jesus: Yeah and so I think a lot of
people do that now, too. Even myself when I’m in my game here, I just use that. So it’s
not that big of a deal. So some other accessories are, of course, I forget what this is called. Kinsey: The Super Wide Gear. Metal Jesus: Super Wide Gear and it’s funky
too. It opens up like this, it hooks on the back. Honestly, I don’t fell like it needs
it that much, but it’s just one of those things that you had back then, right? Kinsey: I used it when I was little. I was
like, “This is awesome. Look at how big it is, yeah!” Metal Jesus: They should do this for other
stuff. Now that I’m thinking about it, I wonder if this hooked on the Vita or something, that’d
be hilarious. Kinsey: It’d be great. Metal Jesus: That’d be great. Another thing
is, we mentioned it earlier and that is you can play most Master System games on it because
the technology is very similar. All you need is a Master Gear converter. Kinsey: Yeah. Metal Jesus: Now what’s weird about this is
that this can be collectible or expensive, not super expensive, but this can cost you
more than the Game Gear itself, which is hilarious. Kinsey: Yeah. Metal Jesus: But, it’s pretty cool. You basically
pop the game in here, it attaches to the back, turn it on and you’re playing Master System
games. So it’s pretty awesome. Another accessory that a lot of people were kind of impressed
with was the TV tuner. Kinsey: Yeah, watch TV on your Game Gear. Metal Jesus: Color TV. But, of course, it’s
really useless today because it’s all broadcast in digital. Kinsey: Yeah and the rabbit ears won’t really
help you. Metal Jesus: Yeah won’t really help you, but
that’s pretty much for accessories, right? There’s a lot of bags and things like that. Kinsey: Yeah, there’s a link cable. Metal Jesus: Oh, right. Kinsey: Want to play a Game Gear with your
friends? Metal Jesus: That’s right, yeah. So that’s
the accessories, but now we probably want to talk about some of the variants of the
hardware, right? Because this is where it can be pretty exciting collecting for the
Game Gear. The Game Gear itself, the black one, is not very expensive. It’s like what,
15, 20 bucks? Kinsey: Yeah, but this is the one a lot of
people know of. So I don’t even know if a lot of people know it comes in other colors. Metal Jesus: Yeah, that’s true. So I showed
off in a pick ups video a little while ago, the yellow one. I know. A lot of people thought
this was fake or some sort of shell, but it actually was released in Japan. That’s where
this comes from. Kinsey: They get all the good colors. Metal Jesus: I know. But yeah I absolutely
love it. I think it’s beautiful. So there’s yellow, also blue. Kinsey: The blue one is probably one of the
more common colors. So little bit rarer than the black, but not much. Metal Jesus: It’s a nice color of blue though. Kinsey: Still awesome. Metal Jesus: Yeah and then you have, I think
one of the rarer ones, right? Kinsey: Yeah. Metal Jesus: It’s certainly collectible. Kinsey: There was also some special edition
ones released, as there is for most systems, but in Japan, for example, this one’s a Magic
Night Rayearth system, which if you’re an anime kid like I am, love it. Rayearth is
awesome. Metal Jesus: And now, did it come with a game? Kinsey: Mm hmm, and it came with a Rayearth
game as well. Metal Jesus: Same exact color as the system,
which is perfect. Kinsey: And it’s beautiful, it’s all matchy,
matchy and if you like Rayearth especially getting the game and the system together it’s…I
don’t know, it was magical when I saw it. Metal Jesus: And you have it in the box. I
was like, “Wow!” Kinsey: Yeah and the game’s really fun too,
especially if you like Rayearth, because it’s just an action game and it’s really fun. Metal Jesus: There’s also some other variants
too. There’s a Coca Cola one, which has another color red, which is really cool looking too.
There’s a few others that people are looking out for so it’s awesome. Kinsey: So now we’re going to talk about some
games. These aren’t necessarily the rarest or the craziest, but these are the ones that
we think are really good to own or we just really enjoy. Metal Jesus: Absolutely. Kinsey: So on that note, I’m going to start
with The Lion King because it’s on everything, but this is me riding in the nostalgia train
for a little bit. The Lion King and also Bonker’s House of Wax, it’s awesome you guys. Don’t
judge me, but these basically were the games I played as a child and it doesn’t do it justice
when I play this on any other system. So this is always recommended by me and it’s not that
expensive. So I think it’s worth it and it really shows off the Game Gear’s capabilities. Metal Jesus: That’s cool. So a game I’m going
to recommend here is a game I was surprised that I really enjoyed. I don’t know if it’s
on any other system, I don’t care, but it’s called Devilish and I thought this would be
some sort of arcade action game. No, it’s actually like an Arkenoid clone, but it’s
got it’s own thing basically where you have the paddles and you’re knocking a ball back
and forth. The screen is heading down, but what’s really cool about this is that you
can reconfigure the paddle. So for instance, you have one paddle or two up above each other,
but then you can split them out. You can put one on it’s side. Plus you can control the
up and down so you can throw the upper paddle higher. I don’t know, it’s just like… Kinsey: It sounds complicated, but at the
same time I’m enthralled. It sounds awesome. Metal Jesus: See, the thing I like is that
Breakout and Arkenoid had been around for so long, that that’s kind of a tired game,
right? But I like games that try to do something new with it because I grew up with that. I
loved those games when they first came out. So Devilish on the Game Gear, pretty cool. Kinsey: It’s got a good name, too. Metal Jesus: It is. Kinsey: And actually on that same vein, Haley
Wars. It’s a vertical shooter. It’s super fun. But what it does a little bit differently
is that whenever you miss one of the ships or one of the asteroids or comets that’s coming
at you, if you miss it, it goes and it hits Earth and you have a gauge on the bottom that
says what percentage Earth is destroyed and if it gets to 100, that’s it. Metal Jesus: Yeah, it’s a surprisingly really
fun shooter. I was like, “I played this a lot.” Now, you’re holding two versions of
it here and I did this because I wanted to remind myself that one of the nice things
about the Game Gear is that it is region free. So often if you can’t find a copy of the North
American version, get the Japanese version. That’s exactly what I did here. You can play
either one, it’s pretty cool. So okay that was cool. Next up for me was a game, I was
a little surprised and that is Vampire Master of Darkness. Kinsey: Yes. Metal Jesus: It looks cheesy as hell. Kinsey: The story’s a little cheesy, but it’s
worth it. Metal Jesus: It’s cool. It’s basically a Castlevania
clone. They’re not even sugar coating it, it’s Castlevania, right? But I like it. For
one, I find it to be a little bit easier than Castlevania for some reason. To me that’s
a good thing because on a little screen it can be difficult. As a matter of fact, this
game on the original Game Gear screen I think is pretty difficult because it’s hard to see
bats and stuff. On my modded one it changes the game, it’s so much more playable. So,
yeah, highly recommended, this is a fun game. Kinsey: Nice. And then one I really wanted
to mention is Revenge of Drancon. What I really like about this game is that it’s super unassuming.
Most people probably walk by this because… Metal Jesus: It looks like a budget title. Kinsey: It looks like a budget, I don’t know,
generic, but, it’s Wonderboy. It’s so fun. It’s basically the arcade version of Wonderboy
and it’s wonderful. Metal Jesus: That’s weird that they changed
the name to something like that, though. Kinsey: I don’t even know how to say it, come
on. It looks super generic, but this is full of wonderful secrets. So if you see this,
you can get it. Metal Jesus: Awesome. Alright so next up for
me is a game called Dragon Crystal, speaking of games that look fairly generic. Now this
game, when I popped it in I was like, “This looks so familiar.” But that’s because it
also came out as Fatal Labyrinth, or at least very similar in style. So this is a maze like
dungeon crawler, top down. This is another game where I popped it in and I played it
for way longer than I expected to because it’s so easy, it’s so much fun. Essentially
you’re just cruising around in this maze, you’re slowly exposing parts of the dungeon
and combat’s fun. You basically just push up against the enemy, you don’t have to battle,
you don’t have to button mash, there’s really not much skill, which is perfect for a handheld
where you’re just trying to have some fun. But there’s armor upgrades and all that sort
of stuff so I enjoyed it quite a bit and this game is dirt cheap. Kinsey: Yeah. Alright and next I’m going to
talk about Legend of Illusion, Mickey Mouse. Metal Jesus: Nice. Kinsey: And this one’s awesome because this
is in the same series of Castles of Illusion, which everybody knows, but this one, I believe
it’s a sequel. It’s in the same series, but it’s…I think the story is a little bit more
interesting and it’s just not one that anyone played. Everybody knows Castle of Illusion,
but this one’s definitely worth it. Metal Jesus: Cool. So next up is a game that
I had never heard of until I got a Game Gear and that is Ax Battler: A Legend of Golden
Axe. So this is a total surprise. It’s basically…it reminds me of Zelda 2, where there’s an overhead
map and then it goes to a 2D exploration. I don’t know, I guess it’s a side thing for
Golden Axe. So I don’t know. It’s pretty cool, I enjoyed it quite a bit and it plays great. Kinsey: Great. Alright and we wanted to mention
a Sonic game. Metal Jesus: Yes. Kinsey: Because how can you talk about a Sega
system without talking about Sonic? Metal Jesus: And you and I were talking like,
“Well which one?” Because you almost picked Sonic Drift. Kinsey: I really like Sonic Drift and Sonic
Drift 2 is the only one that came out in the U.S., but it’s really good and I know everybody
hates it and I’m sorry. Metal Jesus: I just put you on the spot right
there. Like, “Dammit!” Kinsey: I know people don’t like it, but you
can play it on the Sonic Gems on the GameCube. So it’s awesome. Anyways, this is not Sonic
Drift. This is Sonic Triple Trouble and it’s in the same series as Sonic Chaos, it’s the
sequel. A lot of people also didn’t like this one because they thought it was too easy,
but part of me, if I’m sitting on the couch playing Sonic the Hedgehog on a handheld,
easy is fine with me because I really like flying through the levels. That’s when you
can go fast and not have to worry about it as much. Metal Jesus: Yeah I agree. Easy difficulty
is not an automatic turn off for me. I’m like, “No, no, no, that’s kind of cool.” Because
there’s plenty of other ones that are hard. So you can always play those ones too. Kinsey: Yeah. Exactly. Metal Jesus: Alright and then finally, one
of the more collectible and it’s really not even that expensive, but it’s Shining Force,
I’m going to have to say this here, The Sword of Hajhy, H-A-J-H-Y. Kinsey: Hajhy. Metal Jesus: Why? I don’t know, but this is
a fantastic game on the Game Gear. It’s actually one of the more highly rated ones too. Shining
Force games are really cool. They’re very similar to Fire Emblem, where they’re turn
based strategy games. Now I don’t believe this one has permadeath though. There’s a
lot to it. I enjoyed it quite a bit. Again, it’s a little bit more collectible so if you
find a copy, definitely check it out. Kinsey: So that’s our buying guide for the
Sega Game Gear and it’s a pretty rad system. Metal Jesus: I know, I love collecting for
it. I love going to expos and retro gaming stores and everyone else is ignoring it. They’re
looking at Nintendo and I just weasel right passed them, look for games I don’t own. It’s
like awesome. Kinsey: It’s great. Metal Jesus: Now the thing is, is that Hyperkin
has announced that they may add Game Gear support to the Retron 5. Kinsey: Yeah. Metal Jesus: I know, so cool. The Retron 5
is a clone system that supports a lot of different things and Game Gear was left out for some
reason. Kinsey: I know. It’s why I didn’t buy one.
I heard it was going to have all these different systems and I was like, “Game Gear, Game Gear,
Game Gear.” Metal Jesus: It supports Game Boy and Game
Boy Advance. It’s perfect just for Game Gear. I know. I actually reached out to them to
see if they could give me some more information. They didn’t, but I will update this video
in the description and also in the annotations as news comes available. So I’m crossing my
fingers for that. Kinsey: Me too. Metal Jesus: I know. Well hey, thanks for
coming on the channel. Kinsey: Of course. Metal Jesus: Now where can people find you
on the interwebs? Kinsey: I am on Twitter @KinsZilla, K-I-N-S-Z-I-L-L-A. Metal Jesus: And you have a YouTube channel? Kinsey: I have a YouTube channel, three videos
and two that matter. Metal Jesus: Two that matter and the third
one is? Kinsey: Just gameplay from the Witcher when
I had a weird mountain bug, there were mountains in the city. Metal Jesus: Oh really? Kinsey: Yeah, it was too funny not to share. Metal Jesus: Well and you’ve done an unboxing
video. I remember that. That’s awesome. Alright, you can find me @MetalJesusRocks, Twitter,
YouTube, Facebook, all that sort of stuff. Alright guys, thanks very much for watching,
thanks for subscribing and take care. Alright, now that I have the Sega Game Gear
buying guide under my belt, I’m curious, what other buying guides would you like to see
me do? I have some ideas. There’s some good stuff out there. You know what needs to be
done, a P-S-P buying guide needs to be done. That’s a pretty good one because there’s like
three different models, tons of good games.

Acer Nitro 5 vs Lenovo Y540 – 2019 Gaming Laptop Comparison


The new Acer Nitro 5 and Lenovo Y540 are decent
gaming laptops for the money, but what are the differences and which one should you get?
In this detailed comparison I’ll look at pretty much everything to help you decide
which one is right for you. First let’s cover the differences in specs
between the two units I’m testing with. The ones I’m using are very similar, they’ve
got the same Intel i7-9750H CPU, Nvidia GTX 1660 Ti graphics, and 16GB of memory in dual
channel. Both have 512gb M.2 NVMe SSDs and a 15.6” 1080p screen with 60Hz refresh rate,
though 144Hz is also an option. For network connectivity they’ve both got gigabit ethernet,
802.11ac WiFi and Bluetooth 5. Both laptops are available with different
specs though, you can find examples and updated prices linked in the description. Both have black plastic lids, the Nitro 5
is smooth with a textured triangle pattern on the sides while the Y540 has a grooved
textured finish. Both have a subtle logo, however the O on the Y540 lights up, but you
can turn this off. The interior of the Nitro 5 is more of the same matte black plastic
with plenty of red accenting that screams gaming laptop, while the Y540 has a much cleaner
and more professional design, however it seems to be coated in some sort of rubberised material. In terms of weight they were extremely close,
the Y540 was just 12 grams more, so no real difference. Things change with the power bricks
though, the Y540 brick is significantly larger, making the overall package almost 300g more. As for size differences they’re very close,
same thickness, the Y540 is deeper while the Nitro 5 is a little longer. As for screen differences both of my laptops
had 1080p 60Hz IPS panels, so expect different results with the 144Hz options that most people
are likely to buy for gaming. With these panels the Nitro 5 had slightly higher colour gamut,
it was also brighter at every level of brightness, and it had a better contrast ratio. It was the same deal when it came to backlight
bleed, the Nitro 5 was a bit better when compared with the Y540, however this will vary between
panels, but out of these two units the Nitro 5 is the winner with regards to the screens. Neither laptop has G-Sync, however the Y540
does give us the option of enabling or disabling hybrid mode through the Lenovo Vantage software,
which is their control panel. Enabling hybrid mode will give us better battery life with
Nvidia Optimus, as this will use the Intel graphics outside of gaming, while disabling
hybrid mode will give us better performance in games by bypassing Optimus, but at the
expense of worse battery life outside of gaming. It just takes a reboot to swap between the
two modes. The Nitro 5 does not have this option, it will always be using Optimus. Both had similar levels of screen flex, perhaps
a little more with the Nitro 5, but they both seemed sturdy enough. The screen on the Y540
also goes all the way back, if that’s important to you. Although both have thin screen bezels, the
Nitro 5 was able to keep its camera up the top of the panel, while the Y540 has it down
the bottom below the screen. This is what the camera and audio look and
sound like on the Acer Nitro 5, and this is what things looks and sound like on the Lenovo
Y540, I’ve got to put that screen back so we can get the lovely nose cam. The keyboards were fairly similar, the Nitro
5 has red keys even with the lighting off and the Y540 has white lettering, and the
backlighting matches this, so white lighting for the Y540 and red for the Nitro 5. The
backlighting fully illuminates all keys and secondary functions on both laptops. The brightness
levels of both can be adjusted with keyboard shortcuts or turned off completely, the Nitro
5 has 4 levels of brightness and the Y540 has two levels. The Nitro 5 has a more gamer look to it with
accented WASD and arrow keys. It’s also got a shorter right shift key which I know
some people can’t deal with, otherwise I quite liked typing on both, here’s how they
sound to give you an idea of what to expect. I personally prefer the cleaner look of the
Y540, but in terms of typing I’ve got to hand it to the Nitro 5, the key presses just
felt more tactile. The power button for the Nitro 5 is above
the numpad in the keyboard and the Y540 has it placed above the keyboard in the center
which I prefer, far less chance of an accidental press, although you could set this to do nothing
in Windows anyway. Both touch pads use precision drivers, were
smooth to the touch and worked well. The one on the Nitro 5 clicks down anywhere, while
the Y540’s does not as it instead has dedicated left and right click buttons which make slightly
louder clicks. I liked that the touchpad on the Nitro 5 was larger, however in the end
I personally liked using the one in the Y540 more. Both laptops had similar levels of flex while
pushing down hard, the Y540 had more in the actual keyboard area, and the Nitro 5 had
more just below it, though I never found this to be a problem during normal every day use
with either. Both machines show up fingerprints quite easily,
and although they both have smooth surfaces they were easier to clean off the Nitro 5,
as the Y540 has that rubberised texture. The I/O is quite a bit different, at least
in terms of layout. On the left the Y540 just has a USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-A port and 3.5mm audio
jack, while the Nitro 5 has Kensington lock, gigabit ethernet, HDMI 2.0 output, USB 3.1
Gen1 Type-C port, no thunderbolt though, and two USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-A ports. On the right the Y540 is keeping things simple
again, with just a second USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-A port, while the Nitro 5 has a 3.5mm audio
combo jack, USB 2.0 Type-A port, status LEDs and power input. On the back the Nitro 5 just has air exhaust
vents, while the Y540 also has the rest of its I/O. From left to right it’s got a USB
Type-C port, again no Thunderbolt here either, mini DisplayPort 1.4, third USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-A
port, HDMI 2.0 output, gigabit ethernet, power input and kensington lock. The Y540 also has
icons above all of the ports so you can easily see where you need to plug a cable in when
standing over it from the front without the need to turn the machine around. There’s nothing on the front of either machine. For those not keeping track the Y540 has better
I/O options, the key differences are that although both have three USB Type-A ports,
one of the Nitro 5’s is USB 2.0 while the Y540 is all 3.1 Gen1. The Y540 also has a
mini DisplayPort 1.4 output which the Nitro 5 doesn’t have at all, otherwise the Y540
also has everything else the Nitro 5 is offering, but with the bonus of keeping bulky cables
out the back and out of the way. I’ll also note that the head of the charger
on the Nitro 5 does slightly obstruct the side air exhaust vent, though I didn’t find
this to do anything when testing thermals. Underneath both have air intake vents towards
the back of the machine, and the design of the Y540 looks a bit cleaner. We can also
see the speakers here, both are towards the front left and right corners, actually on
the front for the Y540 and towards the sides on the Nitro 5. I found the speakers in the Nitro 5 to sound
better, they were just less tinny sounding in comparison. At max volume with music playing
I found the Nitro 5 a little louder, and the latencymon results with the Nitro 5 were also
a little better, however both seemed to pass the test. Speaking of the BIOS, here’s a super quick
run through of each of them, both are quite basic and locked down with not really many
advanced options available to the user. The bottom panels can be removed by taking
out 11 Phillips head screws. For storage both have a 2.5 inch drive bay, but the Y540 is
limited to one M.2 slot for storage while the Nitro 5 has two. Both machines have two
memory slots, don’t worry I tested both with the same Teamgroup kit in dual channel
for all testing. Otherwise the WiFi card is also accessible here and they’ve also got
different cooling designs. The batteries are similar in size, the Nitro
5 has a 4 cell 58wh battery and the Y540 has a 3 cell 57wh battery. I’ve tested both
machines with the screen at 50% brightness, background apps disabled, and keyboard lighting
off. Outside of gaming the Y540 was lasting 13%
longer than the Nitro 5, and we can see how the battery drains quicker on the Nvidia graphics
with hybrid mode disabled. In terms of gaming, the Y540 technically lasted longer, however
I’m only showing the times here where the game was still playable, at 25% charge left
on the Y540 game FPS dropped to unplayable levels. Now let’s take a look at thermals. Both
laptops were tested in an ambient room temperature of 21 degrees Celsius under the same workloads. By default out of the box neither of these
machines has any undervolting or overclocks applied, they’re just straight stock for
these tests. I have also tested with both CPUs undervolted, the Nitro 5 had a slightly
lower undervolt as I couldn’t get it to match and I tested the Y540 a few weeks prior. The Nitro 5 provides better fan control, you
can customize each fan, while the Y540 on the other hand has no fan control at all.
The Y540 does have different performance modes, quiet, balanced and performance, however in
my review I found the fans would max out all the same under stress test regardless of the
mode I used, so for this reason I am only showing best case results in performance mode. These are the CPU temperatures of both machines
while under combined CPU and GPU loads, we’ll check the GPU results later, so for now just
keep in mind these are CPU results but for combined loads. These stress test results
are from running Aida64 and the Heaven benchmark at the same time to fully load the system. As the Y540 cannot change fan speed, I tested
it in performance mode both for the default and max fan result, so there’s not actually
a change there, but I wanted to show the difference this makes to the Nitro 5, and this is why
the Nitro 5 sees an improvement with the fans at max speed. The undervolt improved both
by a single degree, then the cooling pad made a larger difference to the Y540. These are the CPU clock speeds for those temperatures
we just saw. Despite the Nitro 5 having a cooler CPU the Y540 is actually performing
better and scoring higher clock speeds, which would explain some of the additional heat.
With the Nitro 5 at default fan speed it was actually thermal throttling at 92 degrees,
while the Y540 wasn’t thermally throttling as it has a higher limit. This is why setting
fan speed to maximum raises the nitro 5 clock speed. Once both are undervolted the Y540
is able to hit its 4GHz all core turbo boost speed under this combined CPU and GPU stress
test, an impressive result that not many machines I’ve tested can achieve, while the Nitro
5 is a little behind. Now let’s take a look at the GPU results
for these same tests, so just to clarify we’re still looking at the results while under combined
CPU and GPU stress tests. This time the Y540 was cooler on the GPU. With the fan at default
automatic speed the Nitro 5 was thermal throttling on the GPU, however boosting fan speed removed
this. Again the cooling pad also appears to make a bigger improvement with the Y540, probably
as it has bigger air vents underneath. These are the GPU clock speeds in these same
tests, and like the CPU results the Y540 was ahead in terms of clock speed, this could
in part be due to the cooler temperatures, as this is preferable for GPU boost to operate. Things get interesting when we look at CPU
only load, here at the results of Cinebench R20 with both machines at stock and while
undervolted. The Y540 was significantly ahead in this test, in fact once undervolted this
is one of the best scores I’ve ever seen from a laptop with i7-9750H CPU. This was
because while under a CPU only load the Nitro 5 has a 45 watt TDP limit on the CPU, while
the Y540 allows this to run up to 60 watts. This means that when under a CPU only workload
without the GPU being utilized, the Y540 has a nice advantage, especially as I couldn’t
manually modify these limits. I’ve also tested the blender benchmark which
basically smashes the CPU with load, and the Nitro 5 is taking over 30% longer to complete
the same amount of work, showing that the difference can add up quite a bit over time. I’ve also used Handbrake to convert a 4k
video file to 1080p and a separate 1080p file to 720p, and again the Y540 is performing
faster in this multicore CPU workload due to the higher CPU power limit. As for the areas where you’ll actually be
putting your hands, at idle the Y540 was noticeably warmer. Here’s what we’re looking at with
both under stress test, and I’ve got the Nitro 5 with the fans at the default auto
and max speeds while the Y540 has no fan speed options, and we’ll hear next there’s quite
a difference in fan speeds. At idle the Y540 was completely silent while
the Nitro 5 was just audible, so that likely explains why the Y540 was a little warmer
to the touch. With the stress tests running the Nitro 5 was a little quieter with its
fans on auto speed, however as we saw before it was thermally throttled on both the CPU
and GPU and losing performance. Once the fans are at max speed the Nitro 5 is now quite
a bit louder than the Y540, however the Nitro 5 does give you the option of customizing
the fan speed, so you could tweak this to find a sweet spot. Overall there aren’t too many differences
in terms of thermals, however the Nitro 5 does offer better fan control. This does mean
it can run louder, but you do have more control over it. In terms of raw clock speed, the
Y540 was coming out ahead both in terms of CPU and GPU performance during these tests.
Although the previous generation Y530 did allow you to manually set the fan speed to
maximum, this is not currently an option with the newer Y540. Next, let’s compare some games. As both laptops
were tested at different times different Nvidia drivers were in use, the Nitro 5 was tested
with one version newer, however the changelog did not specify performance improvements for
any of the games I’ve tested. I’ve also tested both in their best available
out of the box performance modes, so for that Nitro 5 that’s just with max fan speed,
while the Y540 had performance mode enabled and hybrid mode disabled. Disabling hybrid
mode requires a reboot, but this means the Nvidia graphics is connected directly to the
screen which can boost game performance compared to using Optimus in some titles, which is
what the Nitro 5 is always using as it has no such option. Battlefield 5 was tested in campaign mode
and the exact same part of the game was tested with each machine. The average frame rate
was essentially the same, though the Y540 was seeing higher 1% low performance. Battlefield 1 flips this around a bit, with
the Nitro 5 now scoring 4.5% higher average FPS than the Y540, however 1% low results
are much more similar, no major difference realistically. Apex Legends was tested at max settings and
the Nitro 5 was just slightly ahead with a 4% lead to average FPS. Shadow of the Tomb Raider was tested with
the built in benchmark, and the Nitro 5 was 4.5% higher in terms of average FPS. Assassin’s Creed Odyssey was also tested
with the built in benchmark, and this was a clear win for the Nitro 5. Although the
average frame rates don’t look too different, the Nitro 5 was just under 6% ahead in terms
of average FPS, but a much larger 22% boost to 1% low. Fortnite was tested using the replay feature,
and in this game both machines were scoring almost exactly the same. Same result for 1%
low, and the Nitro 5 was just 0.5% ahead in average FPS, margin of error stuff. PUBG was also tested using the replay feature
and again saw a similar result in terms of average FPS where the frame rates were essentially
the same, however the Nitro 5 was seeing a 7.5% improvement to 1% low. Dota 2 was tested playing in the middle lane.
While the Y540 was winning here in terms of average FPS, the Nitro 5 had a much larger
48% boost to 1% low which is probably going to matter more considering both already have
high average frame rates. CS:GO was tested with the Ulletical FPS benchmark,
and this is a game that I typically see favour machines that allow you to disable Optimus.
I believe this is the main reason that the Y540 was seeing better performance in this
title, coming out 16% ahead of the Nitro 5. Overwatch was tested in the practice range,
and the Nitro 5 was just 4.5% higher in terms of average FPS, however it had a much larger
30% improvement to 1% low. Far Cry New Dawn was tested with the built
in benchmark, in this test the Y540 was a little ahead in average FPS, but was 21% better
for 1% low. Far Cry 5 was also tested with the built in
benchmark, and the results were very close together, however there was a slight edge
to the Y540. Watch Dogs 2 is another game that’s heavy
on the CPU, though despite the superior CPU clock speeds we saw in the thermal testing
the Nitro 5 was far ahead in this game, where the 1% low wasn’t too far behind the Y540’s
average. Ghost Recon Wildlands was tested with the
built in benchmark and was another win for the Nitro 5, which was almost 5% faster in
terms of average FPS. Metro Exodus was also tested with the built
in benchmark, and the results were extremely close between the two, though technically
the Nitro 5 was just a touch ahead, though it’s margin of error range. The Witcher 3 had similar average FPS on both
laptops with a minimal edge to the Y540, however the Nitro 5 was offering a much better 1%
low result. Rainbow Six Siege was tested with the built
in benchmark, and the Nitro 5 was just 2% ahead in terms of average FPS with a little
more lead in 1% low. DOOM was tested with Vulkan, and both games
were extremely close together with the Y540 slightly ahead in average FPS. Strange brigade was also tested with Vulkan
using the built in benchmark, and again the Y540 was just a little ahead. On average over these 19 games tested the
Acer Nitro 5 was only 1.1% ahead of the Lenovo Y540 in terms of average frame rate at max
settings. If we remove the Watch Dogs 2 result, then the average difference between the two
is almost nothing, but as you can see it really varies by game. Realistically in almost all
cases the frame rates were close enough that I doubt you’ll be seeing a practical difference,
so while the Nitro 5 does have a slight edge I wouldn’t let this factor alone decide
which to get. I’ve also got the overall scores for the
3DMark Fire Strike and Time Spy benchmarks, and again the results are extremely close
between the two, with one ahead for one test and the other ahead in the other. I’ve tested storage with Crystal disk mark.
Both of my machines came with a 512gb NVMe M.2 SSD, however specific storage options
will likely vary by region. With the particular disks in my machines though, the Y540 was
faster. It’s worth noting that both machines also
have a 2.5 inch drive bay for installing additional storage, however the Nitro 5 also has the
advantage of a second M.2 slot, the Y540 only has space for one. For updated pricing check the links in the
description, as prices will change over time. At the time of recording, I haven’t been
able to find the Nitro 5 with these specs for sale in the US, however the Y540 is around
$1270 USD. Here in Australia the Nitro 5 with these specs
is $2000 AUD, or $200 less than the Helios 300 while I bought my Y540 for $1570 AUD on
sale. For my US friends, without taxes and converting the currency that puts my Y540
at $970 USD and the Nitro 5 at $1230, clearly making the Y540 a better deal, well at least
here in Australia. The Nitro 5 would probably be cheaper in the US. I’m making this assumption
based on the fact that the Helios 300 which is superior to the Nitro 5 is cheaper than
the Y540 with same specs. With all of that information in mind let’s
summarise the good and the bad aspects of each laptop and find out which is worth it. The Acer Nitro 5 clearly has more of a gamer
looking design aesthetic, personally I prefer the cleaner professional design of the Y540
but that’s always going to come down to personal taste. The Y540 has the mux switch,
a nice advantage that I wish all laptops had, as this gives the user the choice of running
the machine with Optimus for improved battery life or rebooting to swap to the Nvidia graphics
only for improved gaming performance. Despite this though, with the same specs as
we’ve seen the Nitro 5 was ahead in the majority of games, however once we average
out the results it’s a very narrow lead. While it will depend on the specific game
in use, overall there isn’t really enough of a major difference one way or the other
in games to pick based on that alone. The Nitro 5 had a slightly better screen compared
to the Y540, at least when comparing the 60Hz variant of each machine, expect different
results with 144Hz panels. When actually looking at both side by side at max brightness though
I couldn’t really notice a difference. In terms of build quality I had a hard time
picking one over the other, they’re both plastic however something about the Y540 just
felt a little better to me. It does however have that rubberised texture to it, and I’m
not sure how that would hold up long term. In terms of size, both were about the same
thickness, the Nitro 5 was a little wider, however the Y540 was deeper, the size differences
weren’t really noticeable side by side. I’d say they’re both equally portable,
well until you add the power bricks. Both laptops are almost the same weight, however
once you include the power bricks the total package of the Y540 is 300g more due to its
massive power brick. Both machines get decent battery life for
gaming laptops though, so maybe you won’t need the charger that often. Outside of gaming
the Y540 lasted 13% longer than the Nitro 5, however while gaming on battery power not
only did the Nitro 5 last longer, but it was able to keep the frame rate higher for the
whole test, so if you plan on actually playing games on battery power the Nitro does better. In terms of upgradeability the Nitro 5 has
the option of two M.2 drives in addition to the single 2.5 inch drive bay, while the Y540
only has space for a single M.2 drive, but does also have the 2.5” drive spot. In terms of thermals the Nitro 5 was thermal
throttling on both the CPU and GPU with the fans at the default speed, however we do have
the option of customizing them and setting them to maximum speed which removed this.
The Y540 didn’t have any thermal throttling, however it unfortunately lacks the option
to customize fan speed, which in my opinion is a huge downfall compared to other modern
machines, hopefully they add it in a BIOS update, as its predecessor had this option. The Nitro 5 was cooler on the CPU as a result
of the higher fan speed, while the Y540 was cooler on the GPU. When under the same stress
test the Y540 was clocking higher, but despite this as we saw in games there wasn’t much
difference between the two. The Nitro 5 was limited by its 45 watt CPU
TDP outside of gaming though, as we saw in Cinebench, blender and handbrake the Y540
was able to utilize its higher 60 watt limit, meaning that in CPU workloads where the GPU
isn’t in use the Y540 should perform better. I preferred that the majority of the I/O on
the Y540 was out the back and out of the way, and it did also have slightly better I/O with
an additional mini DisplayPort, and no USB 2.0 like the Nitro 5. Objectively, the Nitro 5 is winning more of
these tests than it’s losing, however realistically there aren’t really any wildly major differences
between the two, so it’s going to come down to what your personal needs are and price
difference. Subjectively, I’m personally all in on the Y540, the gamery design of the
Nitro 5 just isn’t for me, plus the Y540 is around $400 AUD cheaper here with same
specs. If the price is similar in your region with the same specs, and you don’t mind
the more gamery look, the Nitro 5 appears to be the better option in most cases. So which of these two gaming laptops would
you pick, the Lenovo Y540 or Acer Nitro 5? Let me know which and why down in the comments,
I’m really interested to see which you prefer, and if you’re new to the channel consider
getting subscribed for future comparisons and tech videos like this one.

Games Workshop Gwaka’moli Crater Gators (Blood Bowl Lizardmen) Unboxing & Review


(mellow music) Hello, and welcome back. Sleepy WhatsIt here, and I have another miniatures video for you. In today’s video, we’re
going to be taking a look at Games Workshop’s new Blood Bowl team, the Gwaka’mole Crater Gators, which is their new Lizardmen team. As you can see on the back of the box, we get a variety of players,
and the tokens and decals, everything you would expect. So, getting into the box to
see what the actual contents look like, we have a bunch
of standard Blood Bowl bases, actually, far more than we actually need, we have the decals sheet, as always. This one does mention Kroxigor on it, so, in theory, I guess we might eventually be getting a new Kroxigor, I don’t know. I was expecting a Treeman
by now, but whatever. As always, they don’t
have the number of 10, but you know, whatever. Anyway, moving on to the
actual instructions, standard folded in half page that they’ve
been doing for Blood Bowl. I like how these models go together, they’re not push-fit models,
but they socket together really nicely, they were
really easy to assemble, and they didn’t have any really bad seams. So, from an assembly standpoint,
they’re pretty decent, and you can see here on the
back, their suggested lineup that just happens to use
everything that comes in the box. As with all the Blood Bowl
boxes, you can see here, you get two of these
sprues, so 12 players, 6 per sprue, there’s
duplicates of everything. Well-made, well-spaced-out,
well-thought-out, really easy to find everything, as always. So, moving on to the
actual constructed models. The first one we have here
is one of the Sauruses. So I really like these models,
they are nice and detailed, they go together well, they’re
firm, they’re not flimsy, they’re just really nice,
aesthetically interesting models. Some of my minor complaints
about them is, this one even, this is one that stays
on the base the best, out of all of them, you’re going to see they extend really far off the base. When you see how far this
guy comes off the base, that is going to be a
really frustrating thing to play with, at times, like that tail is going to be
hooking on people all the time. So, aesthetically interesting,
I like the dynamic pose, not sure how well this
will work as a game piece. The other, more aesthetic
critique I would have is, if you look on the mask on this guy here, the weird little face guard on these, I really don’t like that look, it just doesn’t really work for me. So I’ve built them here with them on, realistically, I’m probably
going to cut those off before I actually paint this team up, because a) I think it will look better, and b) it’ll make it
easier to paint the models. But, as they go together
well, this is very much a well-designed, thought-out, how you’re going to
build the kit type set. So that, no complaints about
that, just some minor tweaks. So, moving on to the
newest model that we have, or positional, we have for the Lizardmen, the Chameleon Skink, so, I
really like the design of him, I like his little chameleon hands, I like him grabbing the ball. With all the Skinks, you can build them with or without the headdress,
which I’m going to show both. In theory, with the Chameleon, you could not have the tongue
out, but why would you? The Chameleon, as a
positional, I don’t think is that useful, he’s slower, and has a couple skills
I normally wouldn’t take. I understand that he’s really
good, or, would be useful for causing grief for throwing teams and such, but I think, in general,
it’s not a great addition, it’s not like the Halfling
or Goblin positionals, which really improve the
teams that they got here. So, moving on to the
standard Skink Runners, I like the look of them,
they’re very Skink-like, they’re much smaller, they
fit on their bases nicely, they got nice poses, like the Sauruses, they go together really well. The actual things you get in the box, you get six Sauruses, which
is the max you can take, which is great, you don’t
have to buy more Sauruses, you get four regular Skinks,
and two of the Chameleons. In theory, you could run them, all six, as regular Skinks or whatever. Having not played Lizardmen enough to have significantly developed a team, I don’t know if you’re going to
be wanting to buy more Skinks, but I have the sneaking
suspicion, with this box, because of how many
there are in the boxes, it’s not going to be like
a Gutter Runner situation, or a Dark Elf Blitzer situation, or a lot of the bits where
you want just two more of, that you effectively
have to buy another box ’cause no one’s selling them separately. I suspect we’re going to see
on the bits aftermarket scene, a lot of these where you can buy Skinks for relatively cheap. So if you want a few more to
fill out your box, or team, I don’t think you’re
going to be needing to buy a second box of them. But overall, I like the look
of all the players on the team, they’re well-sculpted,
well-designed, they go together well. A lot of them are single-foot poses, but if you look at how
the ankle and leg is, you can really see how you’re going to run the pin up the leg to hold it down. Other than the face mask, I
think I really like the design of them, and the face mask
thing is an easy thing to fix. So yeah, I’m quite
happy with these models. Don’t know when I’m going
to get to play Lizardmen, ’cause I’m currently
playing Skaven in league, but they definitely
will make me interested in trying them out, if only to justify painting these models. Thank you for watching, I
hope you enjoyed the video. If you did, please give the video a like. If you want to see more content like this, please subscribe to the channel, I put out new videos weekly. If you want to see more, like
my actual painting process and assembly, that type,
or what I’m working on, please follow me on social media. Other than that, I look
forward to seeing you in the next one. (mellow music)

Battlefield V – Multiplayer Review

October 11, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 3 Comments

Battlefield V – Multiplayer Review


– [James] Hello Battlefield fans. This year we’re splitting
up the Battlefield V review into its single and multiplayer components with a full review to follow. This video covers the multiplayer only. Be sure to check out the single player and overall reviews in
the video description. (“Legacy” by Johan
Soderqvist and Patrik Andren) (soldier speaking in foreign language) With all the development muscle behind EA Dice’s massive
shooter, I didn’t expect going in that playing Battlefield V’s multiplayer would feel so much like discovering a very promising early access game. There’s a sizeable number
of modes and bug fixes still to be delivered
and it feels as though the good will of free future
DLC has led to the release of a less complete product now. To its credit, a cavalcade
of clever gameplay changes succeeds in changing the series standard 64-player warfare in a
more tactical direction, but the execution simply feels rushed. Still, there’s plenty of
dynamic FPS fun to be had in the Battlefield V today
and I could see it becoming one of the best in the series history after some substantial updates. (soft violin music) Across all of its current
multiplayer modes, Battlefield V’s default mechanic takes a bold step towards the hardcore. Health regeneration is limited, the time to kill is reduced
and the spotting system is almost entirely removed. But the revisions are more thoughtful than simply adopting all
of the hardcore rules. For example, while time to
kill is generally faster, sniper rifles deal less
damage than ever before, letting a snappier feeling to gunplay without excessively disrupting the class’s balance and power. And in lieu of the entire
removal of 3D spotting, only a handful of gadgets
and certain combat traits can now place that infamous
red circle over enemy’s heads. These changes aim to emphasize team play, satisfy gunplay and immersion and all of them find their marks. The incentives for coordinating with your four-person squad are so strong they’re borderline coercive. The scarcity of vital health
and ammunition resources collectively dubbed the attrition system succeeded in making me go out of my way to work with my squad and
strengthen class identity, but felt a little heavy handed at times. Retreating in search of a
friendly medic or a supply station rarely led to any interesting moments. Being able to scavenge from
enemy corpses on the other hand encouraged me to take a lot of fun risks. The ability for anyone
to revive a squadmate regardless of class is
another welcome incentive to stick together, glitching
and awkward it may be. (suspenseful music) Across the board, the 37 firearms of Battlefield V feel fantastic. Pronounced and predictable recoil replaces the random-feeling spray of Battlefield 1. Each class has access to an
assortment of seven to eight primaries, that with the
exception of the medic, who can only wield SMGs, present a variety of playstyle options. The support class possesses
the greatest variance with access to shotguns,
LMGs, devastating MMGs that must be deployed to aim, and the FG42 which in Battlefield V anyway, behaves like an assault rifle. And it’s fun to unlock
flashy but period-appropriate weapon skins that flaunt
your achievements. Battlefield V introduces
a specialization system which in theory allows you
to further tailor a weapon to your preferred playstyle,
but most choices are uninteresting stat tweaks that ironically diminish the effects of Battlefield V’s brand new recoil system. Vehicle specializations are
generally much more alluring, offering more meaningful
and visual alterations. Each infantry class can now
choose from two combat roles that with the exception of
the sniper and pathfinder, feel like a total afterthought. Battlefield V boasts 26
era-appropriate vehicles, a number that absolutely
dwarfs its predecessor’s paltry eight at launch. And yet part of me
misses the rampant chaos caused by the admittedly
overtuned elite units, cavalry and behemoths of Battlefield 1. Tanks can be fun and
whizzing around in a spitfire is neat, but I can’t help but
feel that the relationship between vehicles and infantry in Battlefield V is overly binary. I’ve never enjoyed hate
picking the assault class to destroy enemy armor, but
since Battlefield V tanks are much more difficult to
avoid than their BF1 ancestors, that’s exactly what I found myself doing. Similarly, you will be bombed. When you are, you will either
choose to bring your current objective to a grinding halt
to track down an anti-aircraft gun or tank or just keep going and accept that bombing’s a part of life. (dramatic violin music) Eight maps are available in Battlefield V as of launch and while I’m
not a fan of the extensive labyrinth of identical unfurnished
apartments in Rotterdam, I felt the other seven
maps to be quite enjoyable. Fjell 652 takes place on a high
altitude Norwegian mountain overlooking the entirety Norwich map and is objected to intense
and atmospheric snow storms. Twisted steel is built
around a massive bridge that serves as both a spectacular landmark and a functional mechanism
to add a linear lane to the map’s familiar
open environment speckled with rural villages. Fortifications can be
constructed on any map and are situationally useful. And that’s all I have
to say about building. Unfortunately, even the good
maps don’t always stand up to the test of being ported
to seven different modes. It’s spread across three playlists. The modes themselves
are all over the place, especially in the
infantry-focused playlist where Frontline lasts many times longer than Team Deathmatch or Domination. There’s a particularly
messy portion in Frontlines on Twisted Steel where the defending team has a clear vantage directly
into the attacker’s bomb spawn. On more than one occasion on the Frontlines version of Narwich. I spawned outside of the boundaries, at one point resulting
in an unavoidable death due to desertion and that’s
part of a disappointing trend because Battlefield V is
frankly littered with bugs. Some are of the superficial
and even comical variety, but quite a few others have a major, at times, game breaking impact. In total, I had to exit a
match or relaunch Battlefield V more than a dozen times in
my 60 hours because of menus getting stuck open with no way to close or match timers and
objectives bugging out. Also the all-too-frequent
appearance of my glitches and sticky geometry conveys
a general lack of polish. (soft violin music) the feeling of getting
in on the ground floor is something that will
inevitably be much better mere months now is unavoidable while playing Battlefield V’s multiplayer. Squad play and infantry combat in general is taken in a very worthwhile direction with smart tweaks to guns and resources. But the same care hasn’t
been applied throughout. Rampant bugs, wildly varying
mode times in similar playlists and how big features like
combat roles take their toll. The good news is that patches
are already rolling out and with a year or more of
free maps and modes on the way, Battlefield V can only
get better from here. For more on Battlefield
V, watch our review of the single player campaign
plus the first 15 minutes of gameplay and standby
for the full review. If you enjoyed the video,
shoot me a follow on Twitter @ThuggnDuggn and for everything
else, stick with IGN.

GTX 1660 Ti vs RTX 2060 – Gaming Laptop Comparison


Which graphics should you pick in your next
laptop? The Nvidia GTX 1660 Ti, or is it worth paying more for the RTX 2060? In this comparison
we’ll take a look at the differences in gaming performance, thermals, battery life
and more to help you decide which is worth it. Let’s take a look at how the laptop GTX
1660 Ti and RTX 2060 differ in terms of specs. The RTX 2060 has 25% more CUDA cores than
the 1660 Ti, however the 1660 Ti is capable of higher base and boost clock speeds. Both
graphics options have 6GB of GDDR6 memory, however the 2060’s is a bit faster. The power limits of both graphics also differ
a bit, the 1660 Ti is available with options from 60 watts up to 80 watts, while the 2060
can be found in 80 and 90 watt configurations. In my case both graphics are running at the
top end of the specified GPU power limit, so my 1660 Ti runs at 80 watts while the 2060
runs at 90 watts, expect different results with different power limits. This will vary
between laptops, so unfortunately these results aren’t globally applicable, but should show
us the differences between the best possible 1660 Ti and 2060 laptops. The reason I’m comparing these two is because
the RTX 2060 is the next step up from the GTX 1660 Ti at the moment. To compare fairly I’ve basically got two
of the same laptop so I can do the most possible apples to apples comparison. Massive thanks
to Metabox here in Australia for lending me these units to do this comparison, you can
find prices and links in the description. These are the same Clevo chassis, the only
difference is that one has the GTX 1660 Ti while the other one has the RTX 2060. Both laptops otherwise have the same i7-9750H
CPU, same 16gb of memory in dual channel, same battery and cooling solution, making
this ideal for a best case GPU comparison as we want to minimize as many other component
differences as possible. Both laptops were tested on the same day under
the same conditions with the same Windows updates and Nvidia drivers installed, so let’s
get into the results. Control was tested walking through the start
of the game with the high setting preset, which is the highest option available. In
this game the RTX 2060 was scoring almost 22% higher average FPS, while the 1% low result
from the 2060 wasn’t far behind the average FPS from the 1660 Ti. Ghost Recon Breakpoint was tested using the
built in benchmark at ultra settings, and this game saw one of the smallest differences
between the two graphics out of all games tested with just a 7% higher average frame
rate with the 2060, however there was a larger 27% improvement seen to the 1% low performance. Borderlands 3 was also tested with ultra settings
using the game’s built in benchmark tool, this time the 2060 was 13.5% ahead of the
1660 Ti in terms of average frame rate, with a slightly higher 15% increase to the 1% low
performance. Battlefield 5 was tested with ultra settings
in campaign mode. I’ve also tested it with RTX on, shown by the green bars, and RTX off
in purple. With RTX off the 2060 was 14.5% ahead of the 1660 Ti in terms of average FPS,
but with RTX on the 2060 was almost 50% faster. This larger difference is due to the RTX hardware
the 2060 offers, though at ultra settings the frame rates still weren’t great for
a first person shooter. Apex legends was tested with max settings
in the new season 3 map. The 2060 was reaching average frame rates 14.5% higher than the
1660 Ti, with a smaller 10% increase to 1% low performance. Realistically the game was
still very playable even maxed out on either though. Shadow of the Tomb Raider was tested with
the built in benchmark, and with the highest setting preset it tends to be fairly GPU bound,
which probably explains why the 2060 was a higher 17.6% ahead of the 1660 Ti in average
FPS. The Division 2 was also tested with the built
in benchmark with ultra settings. There was no real difference in terms of 1% low in this
game, while the 2060 was able to achieve an 11% higher average frame rate over the 1660
Ti. Fortnite was tested using the replay feature
with the exact same replay on each machine using epic settings. In this test the 2060
was 16% ahead of the 1660 Ti in average FPS, with a smaller 9% improvement to the 1% low. PUBG was also tested with the same replay
on each machine at max settings. This game saw a much larger 26% higher average frame
rate with the 2060, with an even bigger 31% higher 1% low, so it seems that this game
really benefits from the 2060. F1 2019 was tested with the built in benchmark
with the highest setting preset, and was on the lower side out of the games tested with
just an 8% improvement to average FPS with the 2060, however the improvement to the 1%
low was about double this, with the 2060 scoring a 16% lead in that regard. Metro Exodus was also tested with the built
in benchmark at ultra settings, and at higher setting levels it gets quite GPU bound, resulting
in the 2060 performing 20% better in terms of average frame rate, with almost a similar
boost to the 1% low, which was 19.4% higher than the 1660 Ti. CS:GO was tested with the Ulletical FPS benchmark
at max settings. This game tends to be fairly CPU bound, so a change in graphics only usually
makes little difference, which was the case here. The 2060 was only 2.6% faster in terms
of average FPS, putting this game in last place out of all titles tested in terms of
differences. Assassin’s Creed Odyssey was tested with
the built in benchmark at maximum settings. Like CS:GO just before it, I’ve found this
test to be quite CPU heavy, so the change in graphics doesn’t really matter as much
compared to most other games tested. There was just a 5% increase to average frame rate
with the 2060 here. Rainbow Six Siege was also tested with the
built in benchmark at ultra settings. This game was about on average with the other games,
scoring 14% higher average FPS with the 2060, with a slightly higher 16% boost to 1% low
performance when compared with the 1660 Ti. Overwatch was tested in the practice range
as it allows me to perform the exact same test run, perfect for a comparison like this.
At epic settings the 2060 was 15% ahead of the 1660 Ti in average FPS, and almost 10%
ahead in 1% low performance. The Witcher 3 tends to be more GPU bound in
my experience, and was another game that scored above average out of the titles tested with
the 2060, getting a 17% higher average frame rate, and a slightly lower 15% increase to
the 1% low. Strange Brigade was tested with the built
in benchmark and is our only Vulkan title. At ultra settings there was an above average
19% higher average frame rate with the RTX 2060, and the 1% low rose by the same amount
too. In terms of overall improvement, over these
17 games the 2060 graphics is performing just 14% better in terms of average FPS. As you
can see, the performance difference varies between games, tests that are more CPU bound
like CS:GO and Assassin’s Creed Odyssey saw much lower differences while others like
control saw more than a 20% improvement with the 2060. I’ve also tested some synthetic benchmarks,
including 3DMark’s Time Spy, Fire Strike, and Port Royal. As these are synthetic graphical
tests, the differences are larger than most of the games just tested, with the 2060 coming
out 20% higher than the 1660 Ti in Fire Strike and Time Spy. Port Royal uses ray tracing,
and as this is expected to perform much better on the 2060 due to its RTX hardware its score
was over 150% higher. As both machines have the same cooling solution
and thermal paste we can accurately compare temperature differences. I left both laptops
running the Heaven benchmark at max settings for an hour in a room with an ambient temperature
of 22 degrees Celsius, and the 2060 was clearly warmer, so in games the additional performance
will come at the cost of additional heat. This makes sense when we consider that the
2060 is going to draw more power in order to hit higher levels of performance. My 2060
has a 90 watt TDP while my 1660 Ti has an 80 watt TDP. While playing the Witcher 3 at
ultra settings we can see the 2060 laptop was using 20% more power, which resulted in
17% higher average FPS in this title. The lower power draw of the 1660 Ti seems
to translate into increased battery life too. As both laptops have removable batteries I
actually took out the battery from one of the laptops to test with both machines, so
they were both tested with the exact same battery. The 1660 Ti laptop lasted around
26% longer while playing the Witcher 3, and this was with Nvidia battery boost capping
the frame rate to 30 FPS, however with this particular battery both laptops weren’t
passing 26 FPS anyway. Now for the final difference, the price, you
can check the links in the description for up to date laptop prices with either graphics
card, as prices will change over time. This will depend on where you live, but in general
expect the RTX 2060 to cost more money, as it’s a higher tier graphics option. Let’s start with US pricing, in this example
this same Clevo chassis with 1660 Ti is $1189 USD, while the 2060 model with same specs
is $100 more at $1289 USD, so 8.4% money for an on average 14% higher average frame rate,
sounds ok to me. I’ll use the Lenovo Y540 as another example,
the 1660 Ti model starts at $900 USD at the moment, while the 2060 is only an extra $100,
or $90 with the current sale, so 10% more money, again sounds pretty fair relative to
the performance increase. If you spec both up higher the difference between the two as
a percentage should lower too, for example with the more expensive i7 CPU, 144Hz screen
and dual channel memory, the total cost is higher but the difference between the 1660
Ti and 2060 is still $90 USD, meaning the 2060 is just 7.7% more money now. Here in Australia if we compare these two
machines from Metabox the 1660 Ti model is $1783 AUD while the 2060 model is $1973 AUD,
so again around 10% more money for the 2060. The improvement definitely isn’t that large
between the two, granted it does depend on the game, but based on these prices I think
it does represent a fair improvement, you’re kind of getting the increase you’re paying
for. This is of course with the highest 1660 Ti and 2060 though, if you get a laptop with
a lower powered 80 watt 2060 then the differences will be less. Unfortunately it’s difficult
to know the power limit in most cases as it’s not advertised, they’re all just advertised
as being 2060, so you’ll have to check reviews like mine to see what configuration a specific
model is sold with. There’s also the argument of ray tracing.
Although GTX graphics can now run RTX games, the performance is generally nowhere near
as good compared to the RTX graphics that speed up these tasks at the hardware level.
With that said though, personally I don’t think the RTX 2060 is that impressive in regards
to ray tracing, in many of the games I test turning it on drops the frame rate quite a
bit, I’d prefer to just run RTX off with higher settings and get higher FPS, but that’s
me. This may change in the future as more games start to implement ray tracing and it
becomes better optimized, but at the moment the selection of games is quite small and
the performance on the 2060 isn’t that impressive so I wouldn’t be buying the 2060 purely
for ray tracing in mind. If you are interested in using RTX at a base level though, then
the 2060 will give you much better results than the 1660 Ti. As we’ve seen in general the price increase
for the 2060 seems fair over the 1660 Ti, so personally if I was buying today I’d
just pay the extra for a similar boost to overall performance, ray tracing aside. With
that said though, I think the 1660 Ti is a great sweet spot for laptop gaming today,
so you can’t really go wrong with that either. Let me know which graphics you’d pick down
in the comments for your next laptop, and if you’re new to the channel consider getting
subscribed for more upcoming laptop comparisons and future tech videos like this one.

Elders Play The Untitled Goose Game

October 7, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 100 Comments

Elders Play The Untitled Goose Game


– This is fun, boy.
I like this game. – Goose walking.
Goose walking. Don’t mind me. – (FBE) Are you
enjoying this? – No. ♪ (ragtime intro) ♪ – The screen says,
“Untitled Goose Game” by House House. – As elders, we’re not
good with games. I’m good at chess and golf. – (FBE) Well today, you’re
gonna be playing this video game that just came out recently
called Untitled Goose Game. – The Untitled Goose Game.
Wow, very creative. – (FBE) All right, so first,
we’re gonna have you run through this little
tutorial of the game that explains how it works
so you can learn how to play. – Press to honk. – It says “Press Y to honk.”
– (Goose honks) – Aw, a little goose. – Honk, honk.
Oh, I won’t have to honk, too. Okay. – Okay.
Actually funny, ’cause I was walking around
the nature preserve yesterday and a goose went honking
just like that. – “Hold B to run.”
This an elder game. The goose moves real slow.
I like that. – Now I can run.
I had the runs last week. – Whoops, got off the path.
Turn around. Turn around again.
Oops, that’s not right. – (FBE) Go right up to that
tree trunk there. – That’s what I’m trying to do. – (FBE) Push that down
and then keep going. – Can’t even get to
the tree here. Okay.
– (FBE) There you go. Perfect.
Just go to the right and you’ve got it.
Yeah. – Oh, okay. – “Press A to use your beak.” – (FBE) So, that just means
those lines show up if you can interact with it. (goose honks)
(bicycle bell) – This is a drunk way–
It’s a drunk goose. – (FBE) And then to get
the bottom lock, remember that trigger
with your left hand? – Yeah.
– (FBE) Hold that down and then hit A.
There you go. – This is cool. – What is the purpose of this?
I don’t know. I’ll have to think about this one. – (FBE) So, now you’ve
entered actual gameplay, so go ahead and click
the little minus button on the top left hand corner
of your controller. So, these are you objectives.
So, we’re gonna give you about ten minutes to play
and we’ll see what happens. – “Get into the garden.
Get the groundskeeper wet. Steal the groundskeeper’s keys.”
Aw man, “Make the groundskeeper–” – So, here we go.
Ready? I’m looking for some damn thing.
Oh, there’s some stuff to bring here
and I bring it over with that and take a sandwich.
Why would this be fun? – Okay, let’s drop it.
I have no clue what I’m supposed to be doing here. – What am I supposed to do?
Get into the garden. But where is the garden? – (bell ringing)
– There’s a bell. Church.
Oh, mercy. – Is this the garden?
Oh, here we go. I gotta figure out how
to get in the garden. No, it’s not gonna–
can I jump? No, geese don’t jump.
– (FBE) No jumping. – Man, I suck at this.
Where’s the A? Hold on a minute. – Now where’s he going
with this shovel? Oh dear. – ♪ (music playing) ♪
– Okay. Oh, there comes the gardener. Okay, get into the garden. – I like the game.
I’m actually having fun. I don’t know, maybe there’s
a little goose in me. I don’t know.
(jet engines) – He knows the goose
has got his radio. Maybe he’s–
take a walk in the garden. “Get in the garden.”
Oh, okay. Yeah, yeah, I did that.
Okay, carry on, Elizabeth. – Okay, now I gotta get him wet
as I recall. Okay, sort of sneaking around
behind him. – Sneak up on the
groundskeeper. Let’s sneak up on
the groundskeeper. Come on, come on, come on.
There’s the guy. Oh. – Aflac.
No, just kidding. Sorry, I had to do that once.
Where’s his keys? – Now can I chase this guy around? ♪ (piano music) ♪ – Oh, [bleep]. – He knows I’m trying.
This is fun, boy. I like this game. – (goose honking)
– That’s my favorite part. – What’s that?
– (FBE) Try pushing A. – I am.
Oh. I turned on the water.
The groundskeeper doesn’t want me to do that.
Let’s do that again. – Don’t mind me.
Goose walking. Goose walking.
Don’t mind me. – (FBE) Are you
enjoying this? – No. – Oh, there you are.
I got ’em. – (FBE) You gotta run.
You gotta run away. – Ah.
– (FBE) You did it. – Yeah.
– (FBE) All right, that’s right as time expired.
– Oh, drats. But I’m having so much fun
and I’m causing such drama and chaos. – (FBE) Your ten minutes are up,
so we’re gonna go ahead and stop you here.
– Just as I’m getting the hang of it. – Well darn, that was really fun.
What a bunch of– what a silly way
to spend your time. – This is the kind of game
I’d want my grandkids playing instead of people with guns
and shooting. – (FBE) So once again,
that game is called Untitled Goose Game.
– Should be titled. The Goose and the Gardner. – I don’t know the purpose
of it. I didn’t have fun. – It was fun at first.
The first few minutes, I loved the goose
and I love being able to honk, but it got boring
pretty fast. – So many violent games
are out there. This one would be nice
for kids to play. – (FBE) This game was only
released very recently, but it’s gone pretty viral
despite the $14.99 price tag to download the game.
– Stop it. – Is that expensive?
I don’t even know what it costs to download games. – Well, it shows there are
a lot of people really bored. – (FBE) So, many YouTubers
are posting videos playing this game,
celebrities are tweeting about it, and more.
– It’s weird. This is a weird world.
Why would you tweet about this stupid little game? – (FBE) Some people do say
it’s a pretty stupid game, but others enjoy it
even though it is very simple. – No, because they’re stupid. – It’s not a stupid game.
It’s a fun game. I can’t wait to download it. – (FBE) What do you think
it is about this game that has caused it
to become such a phenomenon with so many people
talking about it? – It just seemed nice.
Maybe– you know what I’m thinking now?
Maybe it’s the fact it didn’t have any explosions
or killing. Maybe right now,
we’re kinda tired. A goose, it’s non-threatening. – Right now, things are
so strange and hard and people don’t agree
with each other and there’s so much anger
that this is a wonderful way to just escape. – It’s a break from the real world
because it is simplistic. You play a video game
that’s got violence in it. Why do I gotta play
a video game? I turn on the news.
It’s refreshing to see a game where nobody died. – I think the goose,
’cause the goose is adorable and then when you see it
get mischievous and try and steal the keys
and do all that stuff. It’s not intense,
it’s just pleasurable and fun. – Maybe appealing to morons,
people with lower IQs or people who have no
confidence. It’s a total waste of time,
unless you’re in the goose business. – (FBE) In your lifetime,
you’ve seen the advent of video games and all
of its crazy evolutions. When video games first
came out, did you ever think that decades later,
despite all this crazy technology we have, that there would be
a game that’s just you as a goose messing
with people? – Nope, nope, nope, nope.
Never thought about it. I’d rather read a book
than play a silly game. – Nah, I had no clue
to that. Some creative people
creating this game with a goose. That’s all we got here,
creative minds. – No, I didn’t think that.
The goose never entered my mind, but I did think
at one time when the first video games came out
and there was Pong and Donkey Kong
and things like that, you remember those.
I thought this would progress into something
sophisticated and meaningful, not some goose. – That surprises me.
It really does. Games have gotten so
complicated and so mainly violent and mean
and this is just playful. – I wouldn’t think there
would be one that would be popular because of everybody’s
so into the graphics and special effects.
When you look back, one of the early most
popular ones was Pac-Man. What was Pac-Man?
A little thing going around eating dots and trying
not to get eaten by something. Once the dots are gone,
you get a new life or whatever it was.
I don’t remember. It’s just fun to play a game.
It’s not life and death. It’s just a game.
– (goose honks) – Thanks for watching this
untitled episode of Elders React. – Shoutout to Delaney. – Be sure to honk
and subscribe for more videos every day. – Thanks for watching.
Honk, honk. – Hey, it’s Sierra,
pro-gooser here at FBE. Do you wanna support
the channel and look good doing it? Well, you should check out
ShopFBE.com. Every t-shirt or hoodie
you buy helps us bring you more videos just like this one.
Bye, guys.

Order of War review

October 7, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 100 Comments

Order of War review


Order of War for the PC review Here’s something you don’t see every day, Square Enix making a World War II strategy game which covers real historical events and not a role playing game which involves pointy eared characters in some fantasy land. Order of War focuses on the end of World War II and is set in the 40s as you push back the German Axis from France or play as the German army trying to repel the Red Army from the East. A couple of years back Company of Heroes did a good job of telling this story so how does this RTS shape up? Well it turns out that Square Enix seem to have made a rather good game. In typical RTS style you point and click your way around the map, swooping round the objectives as you command your soldiers, tanks and artillery to push forward and hold ground. You can also call in air strikes and bombing runs when the situation allows it and of course have to play to the strengths of the resources you’ve been given. For example, foot soldiers can launch surprise attacks on artillery by moving through the trees or can entrench themselves for better protection. I’m not very good at RTS games but it’s good to see the game also caters for players like me. In the early stages each level is divided up into smaller objectives and you’re shown exactly what to do. Your commander even sends in more troops if you’re running low. And if you need some thinking time you can pause the game and still give orders to your troops to get the upper hand. You can watch the action from above or zoom right in, and at the touch of a button the game goes into cinematic mode where you can see the fight in great detail. A nice touch indeed. The music is also excellent although the accents of your commanders can be a little over-the-top at times. With the single player campaigns and online and skirmish modes, there’s plenty to keep you occupied. If you’re a World War II boffin and you like your strategy games, then this one’s definitely worth a look. Order of War gets an excellent 8 out of 10. You’ve been watching a review from Gamesweasel If you want to get the show each week which includes video game reviews, news, previews, competitions and special features head over to gamesweasel.com for our video podcast Gamesweasel TV –

Melodies of Gaming – The Music of The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening (Switch vs Game Boy)


Game music… It’s the melodic element designed to captivate
our emotions and immerse us in the world of the game. The way it harmonises with the visuals helps
to deliver a truly memorable experience. Sometimes, these songs are reborn in brilliant
new form. Welcome to Melodies of Gaming, a musical series
that explores reimagined songs in official game titles and how they capture the essence
of the action. In this premiere episode, we will examine
the music of The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening for the Nintendo Switch and how it has changed
from that of the Game Boy masterpiece. Link’s first handheld adventure features endearing
characters and some of the most emotional storyline moments in Zelda for its time. The music, written by Minako Hamano and Kozue
Ishikawa, complements this surprisingly well. Despite the Game Boy’s hardware limitations,
the chiptunes make the most out of the technology. They utilise various pulse wave audio signals
called ‘duty cycles’ to simulate different instruments, and even employ artificial reverberation
techniques. For the Switch remake, all of the songs have
been recreated by Ryo Nagamatsu, who previously wrote the music for A Link Between Worlds
and Tri Force Heroes. Much like how the tracks from A Link to the
Past were remixed for the sequel, his arrangements of the established songs of Link’s Awakening
follow both the vision and direction of the original compositions. Rather than having a grand orchestral sound,
the new soundtrack focuses primarily on combined solo instruments and modest ensembles. They’re presented in a way to give the sense
of a ‘little hero on a big adventure’. In addition, 8-bit sampling is thrown into
the mix as a callback to the title’s Game Boy origins. Some songs embrace the game’s situational
themes quite well. When Link awakes in Marin’s House, the music
reflects the peaceful and yet disorienting condition in which our hero finds himself. This mood is further amplified by the trills
of the strings ensemble. It’s as if Link were thinking, ‘Where am I?’
or ‘Am I still dreaming?’ It really adds to the ambiance. One of the most notable inclusions is the
unconventional instrumentation that matches the whimsy of the plastic, diorama-like art
style. This is demonstrated with the toy piano lead
of Mabe Village…and the dog barks and cat meows of Animal Village. Mario Paint, anyone? Tal Tal Heights may be one of the most iconic
songs in Zelda handheld history. It appears not only in Link’s Awakening, but
also Four Swords Anniversary Edition, two Hyrule Warriors instalments, and the Super
Smash Bros. series. Ironically, the theme does not play at Tal
Tal Heights, but instead can be heard in the Tal Tal Mountain Range, as well as on Mt.
Tamaranch, where the colossal egg rests. The original 8-bit composition on the Game
Boy sets a strong precedent. [SONG BEGINS]
Starting in G minor, the theme establishes a dominant TI TIKA galloping march rhythm
with the noise channel and pulse waves. After four bars, the legendary eight-note
fanfare from the classic overworld theme plays in two different octaves. Cue the bass. The chords then switch to an Alberti bass
broken chord style as the main melody unfolds. || Just beyond the midpoint is the bridge,
which heralds the transposed repeat of the song. The key shifts by one semitone to G sharp
minor. The distinct bass is absent mostly in this
section, but the low notes of the broken chords–now in an altered duty cycle–fill its role. || Once the melody plays through again, another
bridge comes in the form of a drum solo before the key drops back down to G minor. Leading up to the point when the song loops,
a high-pitched, bell-like tone sounds four times. The entire piece really gives a sense of epicness. The Nintendo Switch version of Tal Tal Heights
remains largely faithful to the original composition, while still taking some creative liberties. It features the same galloping rhythm in the
percussion and accompanying instruments–a style that continues throughout the main body. However, during the bridge that cues the key
change, the nostalgic 8-bit broken chords make their long-awaited return. At the same time, new content in the form
of a flute solo followed by a clarinet solo plays. It’s a very stylish addition that fills out
the bridge nicely. After the melody repeats, the song unexpectedly
elevates to a new tier with another transposition, up to A minor. This change is supplemented by the presence
of a rich trumpet, counterpoint, and harmony, intensifying the atmosphere further. At the end of this section is the song’s climax. It echoes the last two measures of the bass
three more times, layering each iteration with additional instruments that play the
same line. It all concludes with the familiar final bridge. Overall, the piece is moderately ambitious
and arranged quite well. Surprisingly, this is not the only rendition
of the song the game has to offer… The music of The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening
for the Nintendo Switch is beautifully arranged and absolutely overflowing with charm. It may not venture too far from the source
material, but that’s a good thing when the visuals and gameplay also follow so closely
to the original. Similar soundtrack revisions for future Zelda
remakes, such as with the Oracle games, would be very welcome. That’s all for this episode of Melodies of
Gaming. Thanks for listening! If you enjoyed this musical analysis, consider
giving it a Like and let us know which reimagined game music you would like us to examine in
the comments below and we may feature it in a future episode. Please be sure to subscribe and ring that
notification bell if you haven’t yet. And of course, stay tuned to GameXplain for
more Melodies of Gaming, and other things gaming, too. Until next time, ciao!

KIDS REACT TO QUEEN

October 5, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 100 Comments

KIDS REACT TO QUEEN


– (singing along) ♪ Mama mia ♪ – (singing along) ♪ Galileo ♪ – (mouthing) ♪ Galileo ♪ – ♪ Galileo ♪
– (singing along) ♪ Galileo Figaro ♪ – What is this? ♪ (playful music) ♪ – (FBE) So today,
we’re gonna have you listen to a band, and we want you
to tell us what you think about their songs and then
we’re gonna discuss it afterwards. – Cool. – Let’s go! ♪ (synthpop) ♪ – I felt like I’ve
heard this before. – I think I’ve heard this. ♪ (synthpop) ♪ – This is upbeat. – What song is this? – ♪ I’d sit alone ♪
– I think I know who it is. Queen? – (gasping)
– ♪ …through teenage nights ♪ ♪ And everything I had to know ♪ – QUEEN!! – ♪ I heard it on… ♪
– I don’t like it. – ♪ …my radio ♪ – It’s actually really calm and nice. – ♪ …your finest hour, radio ♪ – Is that the name of the song,
“Radio” something? “Radio Ga Ga,” Queen? – ♪ All we hear is Radio ga ga ♪
– “Radio ga ga”? – ♪ …Radio ga ga ♪ – Did he just say “Lady Gaga”? – (yawning)
– ♪ …Radio ga ga ♪ – That was a boring song. – I liked the tone. – The melody is really nice. – Queen is amazing. If you ask me
who’s your favorite artist, I will always say Freddie Mercury
because he is, like, a god! – ♪ She keeps Moet et Chandon ♪
– I know this song. – ♪ In her pretty cabinet ♪ ♪ “Let them eat cake,” she says ♪ – I feel like I’ve
heard this song before. – ♪ A built-in melody ♪ ♪ For Khrushchev and Kennedy ♪
– (humming along) – It’s really good.
I like all of their songs. – It’s so just relaxing
and just… (sighing) – ♪ Caviar and cigarettes ♪
– (gasping) Queen? – ♪ Well versed in etiquette ♪ ♪ Extraordinarily nice ♪ – (singing along)
♪ She’s a Killer Queen ♪ ♪ Gunpowder, gelatine ♪ Like, the harmonies, it’s so cool. – ♪ Guaranteed to blow your mind ♪ – That’s the same band? Oh my gosh! – Does this band
have a song that goes like, ♪ Mama mia, mama mia ♪ Yes, I do know this band. – He’s so good. He’s got– I’m pretty sure–
one of the best ranges ever. – ♪ I want to break free ♪ – I’ve heard this song. – ♪ I want to break free ♪ – You wanna be free? – ♪ I want to break free
from your lies ♪ – You’re already free. – ♪ …self-satisfied… ♪ – Most of their songs
are kind of slow, but some are kind of fast. – ♪ God knows… ♪ ♪ God knows I’ve fallen in love ♪ – It’s a good song.
I’ve heard this before. I think it’s on my dad’s playlist. – ♪ Oh, how I want to be free, baby ♪ ♪ Oh, how I… ♪ – (singing along)
♪ …want to break free ♪ – That was nice, just, what
does he want to break free from? – Just good! I can’t say
any more words except great. – They don’t all have
one type of song. They actually change
what they do a lot of times. – ♪ Are you gonna… ♪
– Ooh! – This is on my dad’s playlist too. – ♪ Fat bottomed girls ♪
– “Fat bottom girl”? – ♪ …go round ♪ – I don’t think I’ve heard this one. – ♪ Hey ♪
– This is different. – ♪ Left alone with big fat Fanny ♪ ♪ She was such a naughty…
– “Big fat fatties.” – “Big fat”? – ♪ …you made
a bad boy outta me ♪ – What is this? – ♪ Oh… ♪
– My dad really likes this song. – ♪ …won’t you
take me home tonight ♪ – This one feels
a lot like the ’70s. – ♪ Oh, down beside
your red firelight ♪ – I don’t like this song. – ♪ Oh, and you give… ♪
– This one has a good melody to it. – (singing along)
♪ Fat bottom girls ♪ ♪ You make the rocking
world go round ♪ – ♪ Fat bottomed girls ♪ – Weird lyrics. – The lyrics are weird. – ♪ Get on your bikes and ride ♪
– “Get on your bikes and ride.” – I liked the singer’s voice. – It’s very iconic. – It’s too rock ‘n’ rolly. – Why are they singing
about fat bottomed girls? It’s kind of insulting to me
because I’m a girl. – ♪ Bicycle ♪ ♪ Bicycle ♪ – I hear it saying “bicycle.” – ♪ I want to ride my bicycle ♪ – You wanna ride your bicycle? – (singing along)
♪ I want to ride my bicycle ♪ ♪ I want to ride… ♪ My dad likes this song. – This one’s really weird.
It’s like, bicycle? Like, where did that come from? – ♪ …where I like ♪ ♪ You say black, I say white ♪ ♪ You say bark, I say bite ♪ – This is a cool song too. – ♪ …hey, man ♪ ♪ Jaws was never my scene ♪ ♪ And I don’t like Star Wars ♪ – You don’t– you
don’t like Star Wars?! – ♪ I don’t believe in Peter Pan ♪ ♪ Frankenstein or Superman ♪ ♪ All I wanna do is ♪ ♪ Bicycle ♪
– That’s funny. He doesn’t believe in Superman
or Frankenstein or Peter Pan. He just wants to ride his bicycle. – It was nice. – His voice is special
because it can do lots of different styles of music. – He can hit low notes
and high notes and his falsetto’s great,
just everything’s great about him and the tons
of vocal tracks that he does to make the harmonies
that just– it’s perfect. (stomping and clapping)
– I know this one. “We Will Rock You.” – Pretty sure everyone
knows this song. – ♪ Buddy, you’re a boy,
make a big noise ♪ ♪ Playing in the street… ♪ – This is, I think, this is
the first Queen song I heard. – (singing along)
♪ You got mud on your face ♪ ♪ You big disgrace ♪ – I heard this at an assembly
before at my school. – (singing along)
♪ We will, we will rock you ♪ – (singing along)
♪ Singing we will, we will rock you ♪ – Oh, we used to sing
this at baseball. – I definitely heard that song,
and I really like it. – This band is actually nice
because they do different things for every single one. – They can play a wide range
to appeal to everyone. – If you don’t sing to this song,
or at least lip sync, you’re a crazy person. – ♪ Is this the real life ♪
– It’s Bohemian Rhapsody. – (singing along)
♪ Is this just fantasy ♪ – (singing along)
♪ Caught in a landslide… ♪ – (singing along)
♪ No escape from reality ♪ – ♪ Mama… ♪
– (singing along) ♪ Oooo ♪ – (singing along) ♪ I don’t want to die ♪ – ♪ I sometimes wish
I’d never been born at all ♪ – I don’t like it. ♪ (soulful guitar solo) ♪ – I like this song too. ♪ (piano playing) ♪ – The thing about this song,
it’s got so many different parts. – (singing along) ♪ Scaramouch,
Scaramouch… ♪ – (singing along)
♪ …will you do the fandango ♪ ♪ Thunderbolts of lightening,
very, very frightening me ♪ – (singing along) ♪ Galileo… ♪ – (singing along) ♪ Galileo… ♪ – (singing along) ♪ Galileo Figaro ♪ – ♪ Magnifico ♪ ♪ Beelzebub has a devil… ♪
– What is this? – ♪ …put aside for me ♪ ♪ For me ♪ – This always reminds me
of the Wayne’s World scene. ♪ (aggressive hard rock music) ♪ – Yes! – I like this song a lot. – (singing along) ♪ So you think
you can stop me and spit in my eye ♪ (drumming table) – (singing along) ♪ So you think
you can love me ♪ ♪ And leave me to die ♪ ♪ Oh, baby… ♪ – ♪ …can’t do this to me, baby ♪ – This is the best thing ever! – ♪ Just gotta get right outta here ♪ – God. (chuckling) Is this the last song? Awwww. – Queen is just superior. – They have a good beat and melody and I like them
because they actually sing about different things
every single song. – Bohemian Rhapsody is
just one of the best rock songs I’ve heard in my life so far. Awesome! Pure magic. (clang!)
– (FBE) Truth! What you just listened to
was one of the most famous bands of all time.
– Really? – (FBE) And they’re called Queen.
– Yeah. The last one made me realize it. – Queen? They should
be named King… or Boys. – Slay, Queen! Puts a whole new meaning
to the term. – (FBE) Queen has sold
somewhere between 150 million to 300 million
records worldwide. – Wow! – That’s a lot of records. – OMG. I can’t even think straight. That’s so many records. – It’s not surprising
because Queen is awesome, but still, that’s a lot! – (FBE) And, finally,
for most of their career, Freddie Mercury fronted the band, but Freddie unfortunately
passed away in 1991 when he was 45 years old
due to complications from AIDS. – Yeah. I didn’t know that he died
of AIDS, but I knew he died. – (FBE) But he’s still considered
one of the greatest singers ever. – I agree. – Really? I did not know that. – (FBE) After listening
to Queen today, do you think there
will ever be a singer as great as Freddie Mercury?
– I have no idea. But there probably will. – Well, there already is.
Her name’s Beyoncé. – I think he is a really good singer. Listening to all
those different songs, his voice is just amazing. – His voice can do so much stuff. He could go high,
low, in the middle, and it’s just awesome. – I don’t think that there will be
a better singer than Freddie Mercury. He was really great
at singing the songs, and he just had
such a strong voice. – People can try and they can
use whatever autotune or anything that’s gonna
come out in the future, but there’s no beating
Freddie Mercury. – Thanks for watching
another episode of Kids React. And we hope it rocked you! – Bye, everyone! – Thank you, guys, for watching me
grow here on Kids React. After a long journey, I’m finally going to move
on to Teens React, and it’s going to be great,
and I will see all of you guys there.