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Alfie Allen Made a ‘Nightmare’ of a First Impression on His ‘Game of Thrones’ Castmates


Thanks for being here. This is your very
first time here. Very first time on “Ellen.” Thank you so much, Ellen. You’ve spent a lot of time
out of the country I bet? Yes. I live in London. Oh, you do? I do. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I know you really, mainly,
from “Game of Thrones,” as the person who had
the little thing– Todger– todger
chopped off, yeah. You had the thing– yeah. Is that what it’s called? Todger. Yeah, that’s what we call it. The todger was chopped off. Me todger. Now, when you read
the script, and they are going to chop off
the “todger,” what do you think about that? I mean, I remember
when it happened, the read-through came through. And I think there was only
read-throughs the first two or three seasons of “Thrones.” And then after that, we
didn’t do them much more. But it was great. I was just happy to be given the
opportunity to tackle something so interesting. Right, yes. That’s a good way to look at it. Now, what was it like? Did you know any
of those people? What was it like when
you met that entire cast? It was funny. I think, the first time
we all met each other and had a big dinner
together was– it was coming up to
Halloween, actually, I think. And so I presumed that everybody
was going to come dressed– it was the first time
we’d all met each other. So I assumed that
everybody was going to come dressed in Halloween outfits. So I turned up with
these people that I’m going to work for, for
about eight years with, dressed as Jason from
“Friday the 13th,” with a hockey mask and plastic
knife coming out my ribs. I see. They loved me, from day one. Maybe that’s when they decided
to cut the “todger” off. Maybe, maybe. Yes. Maybe. He’s the guy. And you nominated
yourself for an Emmy? I did I submitted myself. Yeah, it was crazy. Yeah, it was– thank you. Thank you so much. One person– thank you. So yeah, it was
rather odd having to– I mean, it was, like, a
10-minute deadline that I had to submit myself for. And so, I think, when I heard
about the actual nomination coming through, I was in
a shop in the West End. And I thought it was,
like, a group nomination for Best Drama or something. And my agent said, no, it’s
an individual one, for you. See, had you not submitted, you
wouldn’t have been nominated. Dreams come true,
which is great. You made it come true. All right, and you have
the cutest little dog. I saw a picture. I was going through all
the pictures of your life today, because that’s what I do. What’s this dog’s name? His name is Atta. And I mean, what
a beautiful color that little French bulldog is. He’s a gorgeous boy. He’s a gorgeous boy. He’s got the same
birthday as my daughter. Oh, really? Yeah. And so how old is your
daughter and how old is he? My daughter’s one,
and he is two. Oh, well happy birthday
to both of them. Thank you. And do you celebrate
both birthdays, or do you ignore the dog? I ignore the dog. I ignore the dog. And yeah, we just do FaceTimes
because he’s back in London, and I’m back here. So FaceTimes with the
dog for his birthday. He gets a right treat. Does he understand when
you’re doing FaceTime? Does the dog actually
see you on there? Yeah, there’s, like, I
think they have these– you know, these kind of
doggy hotels that they have. And so yeah, I put him up– Oh, that’s where you see him. –in one of those. And it’s, like, a 24-hour feed. So it’s not really a FaceTime. Not really, no. I was kind of
exaggerating a bit then. I was making myself look nice. Right, yeah. You’re just watching him on
a camera, and he’s in a room. Yeah, he can hear me though. Right. Yeah. I can’t hear him,
but he can hear me. Right. Because I’ve tried to
FaceTime with my animals, when I’m here and my
animals are in Montecito, and they don’t really
fully understand. What kind of dogs have you got? What animals have you got? Oh, we’ve got a lot. I don’t have time. OK. But while you’re here,
there’s some available right down the street. I’ll tell you about– Amazing. Rescue dogs, yes, lovely. Yes. Lovely. Swing by, because there’s
a drive-through window. Let’s talk about “Jojo Rabbit.” It is a very
interesting concept. Explain what this is. So it’s a story, essentially,
about a single mother who’s trying to raise her boy in
a, kind of, horrific situation. I mean, it’s kind of
a universal theme– single mothers trying
to raise their kids. But this is set against the
backdrop of Nazi Germany. And really, it’s
her son, who’s been brainwashed by these people with
their crazy political beliefs. And so she tries to show him
what it means to be, kind of, human and to empathize and
to love– because that’s what makes us human. Yes. That’s a great way to put it. That’s what it is. “Jojo Rabbit” is in
select theaters Friday. And we’ll be right back.

HBO Doctor Commentaries – Game of Thrones

October 17, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 44 Comments

HBO Doctor Commentaries – Game of Thrones


TYRION LANNISTER: Look at me
and tell me what you see. What you see is a dwarf. If I’d been born a peasant, they might have left me
out in the woods to die. Alas, I was born
a Lannister of Casterly Rock. Things are expected of me. I’m Dr. Ali Mattu,
cognitive behavioral therapist, and I’m here today
in collaboration with HBO to offer my take
on themes of mental healthin their shows.Never forget what you are,
the rest of the world will not. Wear it like armor, and it can never be used
to hurt you. Today, we’re focusing on
depression through the lens of Tyrion Lannister
inGame of Thrones.♪ (MUSIC PLAYS) ♪ Anhedonia is a core symptom
of depression, and it’s what happens when you
no longer experience joy or pleasure in the things
that usually gave youjoy or pleasure.It zaps any motivation you have. You seem rather drunk. Drinking and lust. No man can match me
in these things. (GRUNTS) Usually the first thing
people do when they might be experiencing
anhedonia, is just to try more of the kind
of stuff that they enjoy,to try to feel something.But that usually doesn’t work. What you need is to use
that anhedonia, and try to understandwhat changes you might need
to make in your life
to get you moving
in the direction that you want to be in. I’d given up on life, until Varys convinced me
you might be worth living for. You chop off my head, well,
my final days were interesting. You’re going to advise me. What I like to ask my patients
is, to imagine your 100th birthday.Who’s there?What stories are they sharing
about your relationship?
About the achievements
that you’ve made in your life?
What I love about Tyrion is
his story’s aboutconnecting with
a larger purpose,
doing what’s best for Westeros.Owning who he is… (CHEERING)…and the unique ways
he can help others.
We’ll never know if Tyrion
was struggling with a mental illness. But whatever
he was dealing with,didn’t get in the way
of him being a hero.
And that’s true for all of us.No matter what
you’re experiencing,
it doesn’t have to get
in the way
of living the life you want
to live.That’s my take for the day,
I’m Dr. Mattu.
♪ (MUSIC CONCLUDES) ♪

9 Facts About “Game of Thrones” Even Hardcore Fans Might Not Know | Pop Culture Decoded


Kim Renfro: Did you know that Westeros looks just like the United Kingdom, if you put England on top of
an inverted version of Ireland? Well, I know that, because I’ve been covering
the show for years for Insider and I wrote “The Unofficial
Guide to Game of Thrones.” Here are nine more facts
about “Game of Thrones” that might surprise even die-hard fans. There is an episode of “Game of Thrones” that you’ve never seen and
will probably never see. And that is the very
first version of the pilot that they shot over 10 years ago. In that pilot, there is an
actor named Jamie Campbell Bower who played the role of Ser Waymar Royce. He was one of the Night’s
Watchmen who we see in that very first cold-open shot, where they’re ranging beyond the Wall. By the time that it came time
to do reshoots for the pilot, he was working on a Starz
show called “Camelot,” and he was super dedicated to that show. So he decided that he
couldn’t come back and appear in the final version of the
“Game of Thrones” pilot. At the time, George R.R. Martin posted on his blog about the reshoots that were going on for the coming pilot. And he mentioned Jamie Campbell
Bower would unfortunately not be able to come and join
them again for this pilot. However, George kind of hinted that he hoped that maybe Jamie could return to the “Game
of Thrones” universe sometime in the future. Well, all these years later, George’s prophecy is coming true. Jamie Campbell Bower was one
of the first cast members announced in the new HBO prequel series that was gonna be all
about the Age of Heroes and the Long Night. So, hopefully, we’ll see him in an actual “Game of Thrones” show to come. Jon Snow may have died
and come back to life, but actor Kit Harington actually
had a close call of his own while they were filming season seven. There was this scene where
they were on a cliff’s edge, and it was super windy that day. And Kit had this really heavy cape on. And the cinematographer for that episode, Robert McLachlan, said in an interview that Kit was dangerously close
to turning into a kite. He was about to blow off
the side of that cliff. And so they actually had to tie him down to the ground with a special cable while they were filming
all of those scenes. Now, this isn’t something
that you would see in the actual show, but Emilia Clarke posted
a really fun video from behind the scenes that season, and Kit’s, you know, flapping his cape and pretending to be a dragon or whatever, but you can see down in the corner that that cable is actually still tied to him, even as they were goofing off on that set. Did you ever notice that
a King’s Landing scene looks a lot more orange
and red compared to, let’s say, a Castle Black scene, which is a little more blue-toned? Well, those colors that
differentiate the locations on “Game of Thrones” actually
helped composer Ramin Djawadi make the music for the show. How, exactly? Well, Ramin Djawadi has a
condition known as synesthesia, and that means that he
sees colors as music. And so, when he is composing
music to the different scenes, the setting really helps him get inspired for all the various notes
and tones of the show. He has compared this process to painting. So whether it’s Daenerys
in the desert in Essos or Jon Snow at Castle Black, he can kind of pick up
the aesthetic of the show and translate that into music. In the pilot episode, there’s a character named Ros, and she is one of the sex workers who we see in Tyrion’s first-ever scene. Now, Ros is not a
character from the books, and she didn’t even have a
name to begin with in the show, in those early versions of the script. And it was actually George
R.R. Martin who was on set and chatting with the
creators and the actors, and he said: “Hey! Maybe
we should give her a name? Other than red-headed whore.” Which is how she was
described in the scripts. And the actress, Esmé Bianco, said that George R.R. Martin gets the credit for Ros having a name in the show. So, “Game of Thrones” has done more than completely change television and the culture of
fandom around the world. It’s also literally changed the
economy of Northern Ireland. The entire show is based in Belfast. Dozens of locations all
around Northern Ireland were used as the sets for various scenes all throughout all eight seasons. And there’s an entire industry now, called screen tourism, that
has been built out of people who are just flocking to the country, and they want to experience “Game of Thrones” for themselves. But there are literally
people who have jobs and careers now that
they never would have had if “Game of Thrones” wasn’t
filming in Northern Ireland all these years. Arya Stark has a long kill
list that gets shorter and shorter as she becomes
a more skilled assassin as the seasons go on. But there’s one name that disappeared from that list for a
completely different reason. And that was the name of Ser Ilyn Payne. You might have noticed by season five, she was no longer reciting Ser Ilyn Payne’s name on her list. And this was because the actor who played Ser Ilyn Payne, Wilko Johnson, was diagnosed with cancer, and they decided to write
his character off the show, rather than trying to replace him or sort of explain it away. Bonus fact: This is why Bronn had a much bigger role starting in season five. He was the one who stepped in and began sword training with Jaime, even though that role was
Ser Ilyn Payne in the books. Good news, Wilko Johnson’s cancer is in remission as of 2019. So, he’s all well, but he decided
not to return to the show. One of the most-hyped scenes
in the series was Cleganebowl, which finally came to
fruition in season eight. But have you ever wondered
why it’s called Cleganebowl? It actually all has to do
with the 2013 Super Bowl, of all things. So, that year, the coaches
of the opposing teams were brothers. And their names were
Jim and John Harbaugh. Nice little portmanteau: Everyone decided to call it the Harbowl. So, Harbowl was a common
phrase being tossed around. And it was around this time
that someone pieced together a few different theories, and they came up with the idea that Clegane versus Clegane might happen in an epic fight to the death. Why not call that Cleganebowl as well? And so that theory was born. One of the first mysteries
early on in the series is Jon Arryn’s death. But there’s a little clue
that was given to viewers that you might not have noticed. When the raven first arrives in Winterfell bearing the news of Jon Arryn’s death, the music that plays in that moment is actually Littlefinger’s theme. You wouldn’t have known that
it’s Littlefinger’s theme music until much later in the season. But if you rewatch that episode, you can totally put two and two together. And lastly, Theon’s courageous death in season eight, when he was protecting Bran, was actually this really
great callback to season two. He was trying to rally the ironborn troops and thinking that they were
gonna defend Winterfell from whoever was outside the gates. And I’m gonna quote this directly, because I need to give
Theon’s words justice. He said, “[We] die bleeding from a hundred wounds, with arrows in our necks
and spears in our guts.” And how did he die, almost six seasons later? With a spear in his gut. In the battle of Winterfell. The real battle of Winterfell. So. Pretty epic way to go out, Theon. Even if it was sad.

Isaac Asimov, Game of Thrones: How to Write Sociological Stories


These are the Foundation novels by Isaac Asimov. They’re some of the finest pieces of science fiction ever written and even won the Hugo Award in 1966 for all-time best series, despite everyone thinking the one-off award had been made solely to recognize the Lord of the Rings. Attempts to adapt the series go all the way back to 1998 when New Line Cinema had a project in development but scrapped it because the studio had signed on to develop The Lord of the Rings. Another film adaptation was attempted by Columbia in 2009 but also failed to get off the ground, as did a TV series from HBO in 2014. Currently, Apple is working on a 10 episode season, but after such a long history in development hell, I’m skeptical that it’ll actually get released. The Foundation is a uniquely difficult series to adapt, largely because it is a sociological story. In an article for Scientific American, Zeynep Tufekci argued that the reason Game of Thrones declined in quality in its recent seasons was because it changed its focus from sociological storytelling to psychological storytelling. The difference being that psychological stories are focused on individuals, while sociological stories are about institutions. Psychological stories hook the audience in with a compelling character and their struggles. Sociological stories usually have a wider cast of characters that can come in and out of the narrative. They show how the incentives of a particular political system will determine the decisions that the characters are making and as a result allow the reader to understand the decisions that every character is making, even the ones they disagree with. Of course, we can understand the motivations of characters and psychological stories, too, but the distinction here is how we understand them. If a character acts out because of a bad father: psychological. If the character does something immoral because their job incentivizes it: sociological. The 2015 film The Big Short is a great example of this and granted, it’s a true story, so that helps. In one of the movie’s plot lines, the protagonists interview basically every kind of employee involved in the corrupt financial system. Mortgage brokers, regulators and rating agencies and each person tells them essentially the same thing: I’m not a bad person. I’m just incentivized to do what I’m doing. “If we don’t work with them, they will go to our competitors. Not our fault. Simply the way the world works.” And that’s really the essence of what a sociological story is. I should also clarify that I’m not saying that one type of story is good and the other is bad, nor are the terms mutually exclusive. In its heyday, Game of Thrones was strong at both types of storytelling. We care deeply about Aria as an individual, for example, and we got to see how the absence of consequences changes men in the battlefield. We cared about Tyrion and we saw how the politics of King’s Landing changed people or broke them. The Foundation, on the other hand, is peak sociological storytelling. The premise of the story is that there’s a guy named Harry Seldon who comes up with a new science called psychohistory. It’s a science that can predict how groups of people will act, rather than what individuals will do. Individuals are random and unpredictable but people become more predictable as the group gets bigger. So it’s easier to figure out what an empire will do than it is a single person. Using the science, Seldon realizes that the empire he lives in is going to fall and that there’s no way to stop it. So instead of trying to prevent the fall, he’s going to shorten the amount of time between the fall and the rise of the next empire from 30,000 years to just a thousand years. The plan is to send a group of scientists out to the edge of the galaxy so that they’re as isolated as possible, making it easier to predict what kind of crises they’ll face over the centuries. From there they will hopefully safeguard civilization and then revitalize it by establishing a second “Galactic Empire!” And right there in the premise, you can see why this is a sociological story. Psychohistory is based on the idea that institutions behave more or less predictably, regardless of the individuals that actually populate it. If you know what the incentive structure is in an institution, you can predict how it will behave. Okay, so I’m going to do a brief rundown of the series before getting into any spoilery analysis. The first three books are technically called The Foundation Trilogy. They include five short stories and four novellas, which were mostly originally published in Astounding Science-Fiction magazine but then collected into the novels we know them as today in 1951, ’52 and ’53. But they are very much nine distinct stories. So really this should be called The Foundation Trilogy Trilogy. In her article, Tufekci talked about how the willingness of Game of Thrones to write out main characters is a clue that it is a sociological story. The reason for this is because the audience is invested in the political development of a setting more than they are any particular character. We wanted to see who would win the game of thrones and here we want to see what the galaxy will look like politically after the thousand years of quote unquote “darkness.” But instead of the big dramatic character deaths that populate Game of Thrones, the simple march of time brings character in and out of this narrative. None of the characters in the original trilogy appear in more than two of those nine stories which makes this a difficult adaptation if you’re coming at it from a psychological perspective. The audience won’t be able to get too attached to any one protagonist. The characters also do not have deep internal lives. We only see how they act in the context of the plot without getting into their personal relationships. They speak in a very wooden manner as honestly all of the characters in Asimov books do. He’s famous for his ideas, not for his prose. But as Tufekci writes, the “hallmark of sociological storytelling is that it can encourage us to put ourselves in the place of any character and imagine ourselves making similar choices. All of the characters in these stories, both good and bad, are the products of their environments and they make equally self-interested decisions. We don’t need to be emotionally attached to them for sociological storytelling to be effective. We merely need to understand them. For 30 years that’s all there was to the story, leaving things sort of unresolved. We were promised a story that lasts a thousand years, but the original trilogy only got us a third of the way there. But then in the 80s, his publisher wrote him a larger than normal check and insisted that he continued the series. So we got a pair of sequels: Foundation’s Edge and Foundation And Earth. Back when I gave the premise for the story, if you were thinking hey, why is reestablishing an empire inherently a good thing? Well, you’re in luck because Asimov basically agreed with you and puts the idea of empire on trial in the sequels. But most of that happens in Foundation’s Edge, while Foundation And Earth is about a guy wandering around wondering if he made the right decision in the last book. It’s the first book in the series that’s more of a travelogue than a political game but it is very meandering compared to the other books. Since he was writing these in the 80s these are also the first books in the series where the characters are actually allowed to have sex lives, though when you combine that with Asimov’s robotic dialogue, it’s not exactly stimulating Her breasts were a smaller version of the woman herself — massive, firm, and overpoweringly impressive. “well?” she said. Trvize said, in all honesty, “Magnificent!”
“And what will you do about it?” “What does morality dictate on Comporellon, Madam, Lizalore?” “What is that to a man of Terminus? What does your morality dictate? –And begin. My chest is cold and wishes warmth” Trvize stood up and began to disrobe… After Foundation And Earth, Asimov had no idea how to continue the story so he started writing prequel novels about Harry Seldon. Because of that you do sort of feel like the series loses some momentum since the actual conclusion is in book 5, even though the prequels are both a lot of fun. They make the prospect of a TV series pretty exciting though since you could adapt them as flashbacks while telling the rest of the story. So, that’s the series in brief. But what are these books really about and spoiler warning for these stories in books 1 and 2. At the age of 21, Asimov was on his way to his weekly meeting with John W. Campbell, the editor of Astounding Science-Fiction. He had to pitch a story but he didn’t have any ideas. Luckily, he happened to be reading Edward Gibbons’ The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire and thought “Hey! Why not just do this, but in space?” In that original pitch for the series still contains its essence that the story isn’t just about institutions, but about the decline and fall of institutions and subsequently how they form and change with time. In each story, The Foundation will face an existential crisis, usually some outside force that seeks to conquer the planet. They’re called Seldon Crises since Seldon predicted that the crises would happen. We’re told that the good guys can’t win in a fight so they have to rely on something else. Whether it’s diplomacy, economics, religion or some other broader sociological trend in order to ensure their survival. As one character puts it, “Seldon crises are not solved by individuals but by historic forces. Harry Seldon…did not count on brilliant heroics, but on the broad sweeps of economics and sociology. So the solutions to the various crises must be achieved by the forces that become available to us at the time.” Stories usually tell us that a rugged individual can save the planet, The Foundation tells us the opposite. It’s one of the reasons these books are hard for Hollywood to adapt. They endlessly tease big space battles that don’t happen or aren’t important. There is no fist fight to save the universe. There’s a guy explaining why his trade policy will end a war with less bloodshed, not exactly blockbuster material! But this comes back to what we’re talking about with sociological stories, that it’s all about incentives. Asimov’s basic hypothesis about human beings is that were more or less driven by the same motivations and that we’re just doing whatever benefits us based on the setting we happen to be born in. We’re using the forces that become available to us at the time not something unique to the individual. The first few stories in the series show The Foundation using the strategy but they sort of try to have their cake and eat it too. They’re very good at showing how the norms of an institution shape the people within it and also how those norms can paralyze an Institution because it means that no one is able to conceive of a solution for a problem that’s outside of the system. For instance, in the story called The Encyclopedists– The Foundation is run by a group of scientists who are hoarding nuclear technology. The surrounding kingdoms no longer have that tech and each want to conquer The Foundation. Never would these scientists think to simply give their rivals that technology, that’s simply unheard of for that institution. It takes someone outside of that incentive structure to come and change it. So the story is really good at showing how the characters are formed by their setting but the solution does come from one person, even while the text is trying to tell us that one person counts for less than the masses in determining the course of history. The heroes of the early stories do use broader sociological trends to their advantage but the fact that they are individuals doing this is a bit of a contradiction. But a better demonstration of Asimov’s original ideas is in the story originally titled Dead Hand which is the first half of the second novel, Foundation And Empire. The story is about the last remnants of the empire threatening to conquer The Foundation. the protagonists of the story accomplish nothing, the conflict just sort of resolves itself and at the end, one character explains that no matter who is in charge of each faction The Foundation would have won. Basically since most emperor’s were formerly generals who overthrew the previous emperor, it’s impossible for the empire to conquer any meaningful piece of new territory since whoever is in charge of doing so, is much more incentivized to turn around and conquer the capital. In this story, the individual really is at the mercy of broader historical trends that are difficult to reverse and that’s what makes Asimov’s series so vital to science fiction and what makes it so relevant today. When Asimov started writing the series, he did so in the shadow of World War II. Afterwards, he said that “…this was also a time when I’d been living through the Hitler era in the 1930s, where no matter what anyone did, Hitler kept winning victories and the only way that I could possibly find life bearable at the time was to convince myself that no matter what he did he was doomed to defeat in the end.” It’s an optimistic belief, but he was also very much aware of how sometimes the broader historical trends aren’t in our favor, sometimes things fall apart. Many of the issues we’re facing today exist because of a broken system of incentives, not the least of which is climate change. Which is why we have to focus on changing the systems that cause that problem more than on individual behavior even though that’s part of the solution, too. Incredible stories have been told using psychological storytelling but they also comfort us with the fantasy of being able to produce complicated issues to the individual. Great sociological stories, like The Foundation, train us to think of social issues with more nuance instead of finding individuals to blame. It’s a more difficult story to tell which is why Apple, I’ve got my fingers crossed. I’d love nothing more than to see Isaac Asimov’s Foundation on film. Oh, and by the way, Harry Seldon is Asimov’s literary
alter-ego, like he’s the character that resembles Asimov the most. So do us a favor and give the character Asimov’s wicked mutton chops Now if you haven’t read The Foundation novels, then you can find all seven of them on Audible, the sponsor of this video. But I actually want to recommend another book to you that’s relevant to all of this. It’s called the Tyranny of Metrics and it’s a look at how institutions choose to measure will influence how people in that institution behave. It’s a great real-life breakdown of exactly what The Foundation is all about and it’s filled with tons of hilarious anecdotes and is really just a solid read all the way through. So I really recommend checking it out. In addition to those books, Audible has the world’s largest selection of audio books and audio entertainment. You can start listening with a 30-day Audible trial where you’ll get one audiobook and two audible originals for free! Just go to audible.com/justwrite or text:
justwrite to 500 500. That’s audible.com/justwrite. Thanks for watching everyone and a big THANK YOU to my patrons for supporting me on Patreon! I’m going to be updating some of the tiers on Patreon shortly, so keep a lookout for that. Keep writing everyone!

The Valets Still Love Daenerys on “Game of Thrones” – Key & Peele


(guitar music) – Yo. – Wassup. – Game of Thrones though dog. – No, you all caught up? – Bro, I totally
binged watched that whole thing last night dog! – So it’s cold-blooded
up in Westeros, dog! – They killed my (beep) Ned! – Ned Starks! Dum dum dum dum da da da dum. You ain’t seen that
one comin’ did ya? – Oh (beep) hell no. – Uh uh. – Oh my God. – Uh uh. – I mean my man was
just there, right? And he’s talkin’ ’bout,
he got down there on the thing like blip. – Shing! – And then I was like,
pssh, I ain’t worried, they ain’t gonna kill
my boy Ned Starks. – Slip. – And then plop. I was like ahhh! – Yo I told you they
cold-blooded up in there. – And then I was
like, but that’s okay because I still got
my (beep) Khal Drogo. – Oh big Dave Navarro? – Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. – Big Dave Navarro. – Big Dave… (guitar) (screams) – Yeah, that dude picked
up some molten gold, poured it on (beep) heads! (screams) – I wanna sleep with my sister. – Yo. – And then he killed him, right. I mean he big like
Hercules and everything. – Yeah. – I’m like, you can’t kill
Khal Drogos with a papercut! – An infected
scratch up on there? – An infected scratch! – But he got straight (simultaneous) killed! – Oh, but you know who
my favorite character is? – Who’s that dog,
who’s that dog? – Psst, Khaleesis. – Khaleesi. – You know I be likin’
some Khaleesis doy. – But what about Khaleesis straight up with them dragons? Khaleesis with them dragons. – Khaleesis with them dragons. – And Khaleesi’s all like this. And then we talkin’ ’bout – [Peele] Dragons be like. (screeches) (screeches) (Key screeches) (Peele screeches) (roars) – Just straight roastin’ goats! – Yo! – Oh my God! – Yeah, and that’s
when they start killin’ characters
left and right dog! – At the wedding? – Yo at the wedding! – At the wedding? – Robb Starks.
– What. – His wife.
– What. – They got his mom.
– Yo! (simultaneous) Kilt,
kilt, kilt, kilt. – That was a four for one dog. – Four for one up there dog. – That’s a straight
four for one. – Four for one up in there. – What about when they
got Wildlings girl? Talkin’ about… You know nothing Jon Snow. (simultaneous) Kilt! – What about the Hound though? – (Peele) Yo, pssht the
Hound talkin’ about… – (Key) Ahhh! I’m
fallin’ down the hill! – Click! (Key screams) – Kill me, you gotta kill me! – No! (simultaneous) Kilt! – Slowly, by omission. – Be gone. – Yo but what about my
man Taiwan Lannisters? – Taiwan Lannisters. – Taiwan Lannisters. – But Taiwan Lannisters though. – Yo my man talkin’ about (grunts) I’m takin’ a (beep). – He said (squeals) – Unh. (simultaneous) Kilt! – By his own son. – What? – Dadinkles. (gasp) – Dadinkles. – Dadinkles yo. – Dadinkles. (simultaneous) Dadinkles! – Dadinkles is my jam. – Can’t nobody kill Dadinkles! – Dadinkles is my jam, my jelly, my peanut butter,
and my peanuts. – Dinkles
– Dadinkles. – Dinkles though! (simultaneous)
Dinkles is my (beep) (yelling) (choral music)

Game of Thrones S8E03 Explained

October 8, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 100 Comments

Game of Thrones S8E03 Explained


Game of Thrones Season 8 Episode 3 is The
Long Night – the army of the dead attacks Winterfell. The living are Daenerys and Jon with the dragons,
the Dothraki and Unsullied, armies of the north Vale and wildlings, and almost every
other living character. Bran is with Theon in the godswood, cause
the plan is to lure the Night King and kill him to end the war. So the whole gang’s here, fighting to save
the world. And they use some questionable battle tactics
. Their trebuchets are in front of their defences,
so they only get to fire once before they’re overwhelmed and useless. The infantry are in front of the trenches,
so the trenches don’t protect them, in fact they get in the way of the retreat. You’d think everyone shoulda just stayed
in Winterfell, defending the castle, cause that’s what castles are for. There are lots of weird tactics this episode,
made for the sake of heightening the drama. Melisandre arrives. She left for Volantis last season , and some
fans hoped she’d return with an army, or other red priests. Melisandre doesn’t bring allies, but she
does bring fire magic, setting alight the Dothraki weapons. It sure is lucky she came, because those Dothraki
arakhs aren’t Valyrian steel or dragonglass, so they would’ve been pretty useless against
the dead if Mel hadn’t shown up. Melisandre’s confronted by Davos – he
once promised to execute Mel because she burned his friend Shireen. She says there’s no need to kill her because
she’ll die tonight. There’s this great shot of Melisandre’s
shadow in the light – Melisandre believes in just good and evil, black and white with
nothing in-between . But ironically, Melisandre is one of the most morally grey characters
in the series – she does great things and terrible things, and everything in between. The Dothraki charge, lights in the darkness
like stars – that blink out one by one as the Dothraki die. It’s a terrifying apocalyptic image that
also evokes Dothraki religion. The Dothraki believe that when they die, their
spirit becomes a star , riding a fiery horse across the night sky . The more fiercely a
man burns in life, the brighter his star shines . So it’s all the more horrifying that these
fiery Dothraki are extinguished in pitch darkness. The showrunners say this is “the end of
the Dothraki” – which is a pretty bleak end to their journey. Daenerys spent whole seasons winning the trust
of the Dothraki. She learned to be a Khaleesi, and led her
khalasar through the Red Waste. In Season 6, she returned to the Dothraki
and gathered a massive army, declaring them all her personal blood riders , to cross the
seas and conquer as no other Dothraki had – to be hers “Now and always” . But
ten minutes in to this battle, they’re all dead. We never got to see the Dothraki perspective
on foreign Westeros, or how the Dothraki habit of burning and raiding would fit in Dany’s
regime. There weren’t even any named Dothraki this
season – unless you count Qhono, and no one counts Qhono. So this is a sad sudden end to the people
who shaped so much of Daenerys’ story. The plan is to keep the dragons out of combat
until the Night King comes , but when Dany sees the Dothraki die, she abandons the plan,
and she and Jon burn some zombies, as they should’ve from the start. Jon tries to attack the white walkers who
lead the dead, but the walkers conjure a storm that blows him back – similar to the storm
at Hardhome. The dead crash into the living like an unstoppable
force of nature. Jaime Brienne Pod Tormund Beric Hound Gendry
Sam and Edd are all on the front lines, and somehow they all survive this – except for
Edd, which is just his luck. RIP to the 999th Lord Commander of the Night’s
Watch. The fighters realise that that castle thing
was a good idea after all, so they retreat into Winterfell, while the Unsullied hold
back the dead. The Unsullied are uniquely qualified for this
sort of thing. In Game of Thrones history, a group of three
thousand Unsullied famously held off an army of Dothraki at Qohor. Twenty thousand Dothraki broke on the Unsullied
“like waves on a rocky shore” . So the Unsullied are good this, but they can only
last so long against the dead. So Grey Worm closes the trench behind his
men, sacrificing them. So very early in this battle, most of Daenerys’
army is destroyed – her Dothraki and Unsullied are mostly gone. So afterwards, she’ll need the support of
the north more than ever. The living try to the light the trench with
fiery torches – it’s a like a reverse of Helm’s Deep from Lord of the Rings. The torches fail, so Melisandre steps up. Mel had a crisis of faith after Stannis died
in Season 5. She regained some confidence when she resurrected
Jon. And now, she calls on her god to give her
fire, and the trenches light. So Melisandre is filled with faith – she
believes her god has a plan. In the godswood, Bran uses his warging powers
to control some ravens, and he flies them up to the Night King, on his zombie dragon. It’s unclear if Bran is trying to get the
Night King’s attention, or if he’s just having a look-see, or what, but Bran spends
the rest of the battle in warg-mode, doing nothing that we can see. Which seems like a waste of his powers. Bran spent six seasons learning magic to fight
the walkers – and now he’s not using any? He doesn’t warg a dragon, or have some important
vision, or tell anyone anything useful? It seems like Bran knows the future, he knows
how this battle will end, and he’s just sitting and watching while destiny runs it
course. So it’s pretty underwhelming that the culmination
of Bran’s training is him being bait – a MacGuffin on wheels. Did Jojen and Hodor and Bran’s personality
die for this? The dead are held back by the fiery trench,
but the Night King orders them to form a bridge of corpses. Part of why the wights are scary is that they
have human bodies, but no humanity – they’re just mindless machines with no self-preservation,
and no mercy. The dead assault the walls, and the heroes
hack and slash. A bunch of times, we see characters facing
certain death, covered in wights, but then someone saves them with one sword-stoke, or
the camera just cuts, and it’s scary the first few times, but it’s soon clear that
none of the main characters are in danger. Lyanna Mormont, the young Lady of Bear Isle,
dies killing a wight giant. Lyanna had always talked big talk. Now, she follows through with action, giving
her life to defend the north. There are hints in the books that Tormund
might be Lyanna’s father – go watch that video. So it’s cool that last episode, Tormund
claimed to have killed a giant . Now, his possible daughter Lyanna has also killed a
giant – must run in the family. The Hound freaks out – he’s afraid of
fire, since his brother the Mountain burned his face. In Season 2, the Hound ran from the Battle
of Blackwater because of this fear. But when the Hound sees Arya in trouble, he
overcomes his fear, and rushes to help her. So again, Arya inspires the Hound be a braver
better man. Arya does some sick ninja moves, using all
her training with the Faceless Men – they taught her to fight with staffs, and in the
dark. But she takes a blow to the head, and retreats
to the Winterfell library for a stealth section, like the kitchen scene in Jurrasic Park. She silently kills a wight, and gently lowers
it to the ground. This is an intimate dance with death. Arya’s arc is all about the deaths of her
friends, the deaths of her enemies – now she gets dangerously close to her own death
. When she’s overwhelmed, the Hound and Beric save her. Beric gives up his last life, sacrificing
himself in a Jesus T-pose. Beric believed the Lord of Light had a special
plan for him, and that’s why he was resurrected six times. Turns out Beric’s destiny was to save Arya. You’d think that god could’ve cut out
the middle-man and just resurrected Arya if needed – but since when were gods efficient? Arya sees Melisandre – they met before,
in Season 3. Melisandre had told Arya she would shut many
eyes forever – including “blue eyes” . She also reminds Arya of something Syrio
said – “What do we say to the God of Death?”, “Not today” . So Mel is hinting that Arya’s
destiny is to kill the Night King, the blue-eyed embodiment of death. Of course, these scenes were shot before the
showrunners decided to have Arya kill the Night King, so they’re sorta retconned into
seeming relevant – Melisandre changes the wording of the eyes quote to emphasise the
blue eyes . The series spent seven seasons setting up Jon and Dany as the forces to beat
the white walkers. But now at the last minute they shoehorn Arya
in as though she was foreshadowed from the start. In the skies, the dragons dance. There hasn’t been a dragon fight in Westeros
for over a hundred years, and there’s never been a fight with a zombie dragon. Daenerys’ dragon wounds the zombie dragon
Viserion, ripping off half his face. But Jon’s dragon Rhaegal is also hurt, and
crashes with Jon to the ground. Daenerys’ dragon burns the Night King, but
he’s unhurt, and smirks like an anime villain. Jon chases the Night King on foot, so the
Night King raises all the dead as zombies. Edd, Lyanna and Qhono all rise to fight their
former allies, which would be much scarier if these guys were important characters. Jon is completely surrounded by zombies, but
when the camera cuts back, he’s fine. Jon has survived so many unsurvivable situations
lately that it’s getting hard to care when he’s in danger. Daenerys lands her dragon, and it’s swarmed
by zombies, like ants over a lizard. Daenerys falls off Drogon – she should really
strap herself on to a saddle, like the old Targaryens did. Jorah’s khaleesi-sense tingles, and he rushes
to help her. Jorah ultimately dies protecting Daenerys,
which is about the best death he could’ve hoped for. He’s always been defined by his loyalty
to his khaleesi, so he dies as he lived. Meanwhile, Tyrion Sansa Missandei Varys and
Gilly hide in the crypts. Tyrion wants to help the battle somehow, but
Sansa says they can’t do anything, so they don’t. Tyrion jokes that he and Sansa should’ve
stayed married, but Sansa says it wouldn’t work because of Tyrion’s “divided loyalties”
– he’s more loyal to Daenerys than to the Starks. The show seems to be setting up conflict between
Daenerys’ squad and Jon’s, and Tyrion is at its centre. When the Night King raises the dead, the dead
Starks in the crypts also rise – who would’ve thought that a room full of corpses would
be dangerous with an icy necromancer on the loose. Sansa and Tyrion share a moment of tenderness,
holding dragonglass daggers. Some viewers saw this like they were about
to kill themselves, but a behind-the-scenes feature suggests they’re actually about
fight the zombies in some cut footage. The living are overwhelmed by the dead, and
Jon tries to get to Bran. He sees Sam almost killed by wights, but doesn’t
help him, which in bird culture is considered a dick more. Jon ends up pinned by the wounded zombie dragon. Fire streams from its neck, where it was bit
by Drogon. The walkers reach the godswood, and Theon
is the last ironborn standing. Bran tells Theon that he’s a good man , and
that Winterfell is his home . All Theon ever wanted was a home, and a family that accepted
him. That tension is what led him to betray the
Starks, and take Winterfell from Bran. But now Bran forgives him. Theon finally gets his redemption, and is
killed by the Night King. In Book 5, Theon stands in this godswood and
prays for a sword – “Let me die as Theon, not as Reek” . Now, he gets his wish. The Night King approaches Bran in ultra slow
motion – he’s waited eight thousand years for this, so like any super villain, he takes
his sweet time. He and Bran and represent powerful magic forces
– Bran the three-eyed raven holds the world’s memory and history, whatever that means, and
the Night King is an ancient weapon who turned on his creators, the children of the forest. Just as he’s about to kill Bran, Arya leaps
out of nowhere and attacks. The Night King catches Arya, but she drops
her dagger into her off hand, and stabs the Night King – in the same place where the
dragonglass that created him was stabbed. Arya’s Valyrian knife was originally used
in an attempt on Bran’s life – now Arya uses the knife to save Bran’s life. And the knife has a much older history – Sam
once found a book connecting the knife to the ancient Targaryens who took Westeros three
hundred years ago. The showrunners hinted that the hilt of this
blade is made from the same chunk of dragonglass that created the Night King – and so he
was unmade by the same dragonglass that created him .
The Night King is destroyed, and all his walkers and wights also fall – like in the Phantom
Menace. Arya ends the Great War, and Melisandre walks
out into the dawn. She dedicated her life to winning this war. She is hundreds of years old, essentially
a slave to her god. Now, with her purpose finally fulfilled, she
lets herself rest. She reverts to her true ancient form, and
dies in the snow. So this episode brings a neat end the arcs
of Melisandre, Theon and Jorah. But what does it mean for the main characters,
and the white walkers, and Game of Thrones itself? In recent seasons, there’s a lot of foreshadowing
leading up to Arya killing the Night King in the godswood. Bran gave Arya her Valyrian knife in the godswood
last season, and you can tell he had a special purpose in mind. Then Arya sneaks up on Jon in the godswood
, just as she sneaks up on the Night King. And Arya uses the same hand-switching trick
with the knife on Brienne that she uses on the Night King. Arya trained for seasons to be a stealthy
deadly assassin. Her story is about death, and the Night King
is the embodiment of death. Maybe now that she’s killed him, Arya can
let go of her vengeance quest, and reconnect with her humanity. So from the perspective of Arya’s story,
her killing the Night King makes sense. But what does it mean for Jon and Dany? It’s clear from the start that Jon and Daenerys
are central to the magic and prophecy in this story – the song of ice and fire. Daenerys was miraculously reborn unburnt with
dragons beneath a bleeding star. Jon Snow was resurrected like Christ, he’s
been fighting the dead since Season 1, and he’s faced off the Night King repeatedly. Jon and Dany both come from the ancient magic
Targaryen bloodline, and there’s a prophecy hinting that they will save the world from
the white walkers, with some magic sacrifice. The show doesn’t mention the prophecy stuff
as much as the books do, but it’s still heavily hinted that defeating the walkers
is Jon and Dany’s destiny. So it’s pretty crazy that Jon and Dany not
only don’t kill the Night King, but they’re barely involved in the end – like, while
Arya saves the world, Dany’s crying over Ser Friendzone, and Jon is.. yelling at a
dragon. It’s not clear if Jon and Dany really helped
beat the walkers at all. Like, yeah they gathered the armies and helped
fight the dead, but that was always a losing battle , just a ploy to lure the Night King
. If Jon and Dany weren’t there at all, the Night King still would’ve come for Bran,
and Arya still could’ve killed him, right? Jon and Dany represent the song of ice and
fire, yet they played only minor roles in its climax. The showrunners said they had Arya kill the
Night King because it was unexpected . And Game of Thrones has always had surprising
twists – like when the ‘main character’ Ned Stark died in Season 1. And the deaths of Catelyn and Robb at the
Red Wedding. But those twists had meaning. They showed how honour and love can get you
killed in a world of treacherous politics. What’s the meaning of Arya jumping from
nowhere to kill the Night King? That it’s cool to be a ninja? That Arya’s dehumanising murderous hate-fuelled
quest was good? And where does that leave Jon and Daenerys? If their destiny isn’t about beating the
white walkers, what is it about? Taking the Iron Throne? The whole point of the walkers is to show
that the Throne is irrelevant – human greed and pride will just lead to our self-destruction. The walkers are an apocalyptic threat that
forces humanity to abandon their power struggles and unite – the north, the wildlings, and
Daenerys came together to face a true enemy. But suddenly, that’s all over in Episode
3 – so will Jon and Dany now fight another yet war for the Throne, against Cersei? Why include the white walkers in the story
if they’re just a stepping stone to more human war and petty politics? Was the ancient ice demon apocalypse just
a warmup for the war against a drunk queen and her pal the horny pirate? Thrones author George Martin says his series
will end like the Lord of the Rings books, with the Scouring of the Shire. In the final chapters of Rings, after the
good guys beat Sauron, the hobbits return to the Shire and have to deal with Saruman. It’s a bittersweet epilogue that shows that
the world is saved, but it’s also changed, and its heroes have too. Maybe Thrones will do something similar. The big bad white walkers are defeated, but
taking Cersei off the Throne will be a time to reflect on how the last eight seasons have
scarred Westeros and its people. But there are three long episodes left – and
if they’re filled with more big battles and power struggles, that would undercut the
whole point of the walkers as a metaphor for how terrible and pointless war is. We also learned nothing new about the white
walkers – no great revelations of their motivations or origins. Nothing about these spirals, or the babies,
or the deeper mysteries hinted in the books. And maybe that’s fine – the white walkers
aren’t characters, they’re a device. Like zombies in other stories, their purpose
is to push the human characters to extremes, to show what they’re really made of, and
make them do extraordinary things. But in this episode, the main characters did
nothing new. Jon and Daenerys were brave. Arya was badass. Tyrion drank wine. Bran was confusing. We did get neat conclusions for Theon and
Jorah and Beric and Mel – but these are secondary characters. You’d think the final confrontation with
the ultimate bad guys should’ve brought out something climactic from the main characters. You’d also think that at least one main
character would have died. But in the end, the white walkers just didn’t
impact the story that much. Walder Frey killed more important characters
than the Night King did. All the walkers really was bring Jon and Daenerys
together. And if Jon and Dany’s alliance just leads
to more war, it’s hard to see the point of the walkers. And sure, maybe there’ll be a twist. Maybe the Night King will respawn at the spiral
tree for Round 2, and some climax with Jon and Dany will happen after all. Maybe Bran was up to something with his magic
– we still dunno what he was doing all battle, or what his arc is meant to mean. We’ll just have to wait and see. Game of Thrones ends in a few weeks. The Game of Thrones books go deep into prophecy,
with intricate hints and symbolism. But we’re also warned against prophecy. One of the coolest characters in the books
who doesn’t appear in the show is Marwyn the Mage, a sort of rogue professor, a paranoid
maverick maester. He talks about the prophecy of Azor Ahai,
that hints that Jon or Daenerys will beat the white walkers, and he says he doesn’t
trust it. He compares prophecy to a “treacherous woman”
who gives “pleasure” until “her teeth snap shut” – “That is the nature of
prophecy … Prophecy will bite your prick off every time” . You can hear all about
Marwyn and Azor Ahai for free today by signing up for a trial with Audible. Members get a book each month, and if you
cancel, you keep the books. You can read in the car or the gym or while
you chill out and wait for your sister to save the world. Sign up at audible.com/asx. Thanks for watching. We’re holding livestreams right after each
episode of Thrones, and Patreon supporters can watch past livestreams. Thanks to Patrons Peter Meehan, Emily McNally,
sandra lange, Marian, Patrick Long, Robert Gane, and Kewl0210. Cheers.

Creating a Likable Video Game Villain

October 6, 2019 | Articles, Blog | 100 Comments

Creating a Likable Video Game Villain


When it comes to characters in video games,
I find myself more interested in companions and villains than any other kinds of characters. A while back, I even made a video where I
explored what goes into creating a likable companion, and now I want to look at the other
side of the coin and discuss what makes a likable villain. Before I go too deep into things, I want to
make a distinction between a good villain and a likable one. A good villain creates external and internal
conflict for the protagonist, heightening the stakes of the story. What makes a good villain is entirely dependent
on how they push a narrative forward, and it has little to do with whether or not the
player likes them. Characters like Andrew Ryan from Bioshock,
Rafe Adler from Uncharted 4, and even Badeline from Celeste all do an incredible job of motivating
the protagonist and player by irritating them. They are so easy to dislike and be angry with,
further magnifying the narrative’s conflict. Likable villains however are ones that players
grow a strange attachment to and, in some cases, are even rooting for despite them being
generally pretty horrible. So, when I say likable villains, this is what
I am referring to: characters you should probably hate, but actually enjoy having around. This of course leads to the question: What
goes into making a likable video game villain? And to answer that it’s important to look
out how villains from games differ from ones from other kinds of media. Creating a likable villain in a video game
is a difficult task because of how games typically approach point of view. Where games often just stick to the perspective
of the protagonist, TV shows, films, and books are more likely to jump between characters. Shows like Daredevil, Justified, and Game
of Thrones spend a lot of time developing their villains, allowing the audience to better
understand and relate to them while also raising the stakes for their inevitable confrontations
they’ll have with the good guys. One of my favorite recent examples of this
is from the BBC show Killing Eve. Each episode is split between the protagonist,
Eve, an MI6 operative and, Villanelle, the serial murderer Eve is trying to track down. This setup of focusing on both Eve and Villanelle
gives viewers the chance to see Villanelle through a lens not tinted by fear. In most media, scenes with serial killers
in them are tense and terrifying, but the majority of the scenes with Villanelle and
her victims are surprisingly playful. Her sick sense of humor and various quirks
are always on display, subverting the viewers expectations of what a killer should be, and,
in a twisted way, it makes her fun to watch. While I rooted for Eve, I also wanted Villanelle
to keep getting away with her crimes so that the fun of the show could continue. And I think that feeling is at the core of
most likable villains: the knowledge that they need to be stopped, but also a nagging
sense that them losing would almost be as sad as the protagonist losing. With games, it is jarring to pull away from
the point of view of the character one is playing as, so the majority of interactions
a player ends up having with a villain are in situations where the two characters are
in the same place and in direct opposition with each other. While there are obviously exceptions, it is
difficult to connect with a villain when every interaction with them leads to conflict. Some titles try to solve this by showing cutscenes
of what the villain is up to elsewhere, but even then, developers are limited on how much
they can show because when most people decide to play a game, they want to play a game and
not watch a movie’s worth of cutscenes, usually, meaning games need to limit how often
they jump away from the player and to the villain. Games like Final Fantasy 7 had some success
doing something similar by having playable flashbacks of a time when the protagonist
was aligned with the villain, showing how things came to be, but this method can also
grind the pace of the primary narrative to a halt. A different solution is letting the player
play as both the protagonist and the villain, but that obviously creates a whole different
set of things to balance, like how evil to make the villain and how to still make it
clear that they are actually the bad guy. The most common way games get around this
is by having the villain in constant communication with the protagonist and player from afar. This idea was popularized with the radios
in Bioshock, and a many big games have followed its example since. Handsome Jack from Borderlands 2 and Pagan
Min from Far Cry 4 are both solid examples of characters who benefit from being able
to communicate directly to the player, giving a chance to learn about them in a context
devoid of conflict. It allows players to appreciate their eccentric
personalities without having to worry about the tension of being murdered by them. Arguably, the most popular example of this
is GLaDos from Portal. She is in control of Aperture Science’s
Enrichment Center, but this control only allows her to have limited interactions with the
protagonist and player. GLaDOS also is not openly hostile to the main
character at the start of the first game. She is introduced as the guide and proctor
for the various tests, and it isn’t until later that she unceremoniously tries to murder
the protagonist. By portraying GLaDOS as an ally, and then
a foe, players get to appreciate her humorous dialogue without worry, and then later think
back on how they probably should have seen her love for murdering humans coming. While the way a character is portrayed to
the player is important, they also need to have likable qualities about them. There are many reasons we end up gravitating
towards others, but a major one is that people tend to like those who have something to offer
them. With companions in games, this comes in the
form of assistance whether it be through gameplay mechanics or events within the story, both
leading to forming a clear bond between player and companion. Villians on the other hand have far less options
when it comes to having something to offer the player as they, more often than not, are
actively trying to thwart them. Some games frame the villain as a sort of
mentor to the protagonist, providing useful lessons and seeming to genuinely care about
them despite also maybe wanting to kill them. Others put the protagonist and villain in
a situation where they need to overcome a common obstacle, allowing players to get a
better understanding of them before going back to their old ways. From what I’ve seen, the most common approach
to making a villain more endearing, especially in games, is through humor. While a villain may not have any help to offer,
if they can get a player to laugh or smile at joke, it shifts how they player views them. As it turns out, people like funny stuff,
so it is natural that they gravitate toward characters who provide that. As dumb as it is, the funnier I find a villain,
the longer I hope they stick around. GLaDOS spends an exorbitant amount of time
trying to torment and kill the player character, but her dry humor and perfect comedic timing
made me always want her around. It made me care about her character to the
point where in Portal 2 when more information is given about her backstory, I was entirely
invested in how she came to be. Handsome Jack is another example of a villain
who uses comedy to disarm the player, creating a playful, yet still dangerous rivalry. This set up leads to a surprising shift in
Jack after he loses someone important to him, which completely changes how he interacts
with the player from that moment on. A sense of somberness replaces the bombastic
nature the player has grown used to, which made me feel a tinge of sadness for him and
his life, even though, like, everything bad that happened to him was all his fault. The game used comedy to lower my walls, and
it used tragedy to get me to understand him better. There is a subset of likable villains that
I don’t fully understand as they kind of go against everything that should make a character
likable but a lot of people gravitate toward villains who have an unpredictable and cruel
nature. The Joker has endured as one of the most beloved
villains for so long partially because he is genuinely funny, but mostly because he
never ceases to shock audiences. Villains like this who can best be described
as charismatic psychopaths are fascinating to watch because of the uncertainty that comes
with every scene they are in. Their motivations typically come from a place
of wanting to see the beauty of chaos. While they may amass power, their goal more
often than not isn’t to rule or destroy the world, but rather to see how far they
can push the limits of humanity. For this reason, these kinds of characters
are often the least redeemable and in a real world context they would be beyond terrifying,
but within fiction, their lack of inhibition and empathy makes them an extremely intriguing,
leaving the audience wanting to see more. Vaas from Far Cry 3 and Sander Cohen from
Bioshock are both examples of characters who command the player’s attention while they
are on screen, and their warped sense of reality is so unbelievable and unrelatable that it
is hard not to have a morbid sense of curiosity about them and what it was that brought them
to where they are now. However, the thing that seems to draw people
to villains the most is when they are relatable in some profound way. Villains are most likeable when it is easy
to imagine oneself in their position and understand why they do the things they do, even though
the audience most likely will not agree with them. Unless, I guess, the audience is the villain. It can be argued that these tragic villains
show a side of humanity that protagonists rarely do. They are the ones who make hard choices in
an effort to fix the problems they see in themselves and the world around them; what
sets them apart from others is the lengths they are willing to go to do so. However, this is where I think video games
often fall short compared to other forms of media, and it comes back to how games typically
don’t spend enough time with the villain to fully develop them. Players don’t often get to see villains
interacting with characters aside from the protagonist, which makes it harder to understand
who they are on a broader scale. It is also rare for games to show how the
villain grew into the person they’ve become. While learning about a villains progression
through radio conversations is better than nothing, it ends up being less effective than
seeing the transformation firsthand. This isn’t to say it’s impossible to have
a villain players feel empathy for; there are plenty of interesting tragic villains
out there, I just think that games haven’t found the optimal way to present them yet,
which is fair as games are a relatively new medium that’s still exploring the different
ways it can tell a story. All in all, a villain being likable is obviously
subjective. The things I talk about in this video are
some of the common trends I’ve noticed, but it isn’t a science. Everyone views the actions of a character
differently. Also, when it comes to villains, it is tough
to strike the right balance between being likable enough where the audience wants them
to stick around longer and a little too likable where the audience starts excusing their terrible
behavior. However, villains that aren’t easily defined
as pure evil are more realistic to our world, and serve to teach us so much more than villains
that are clearly all bad. With that said, while I am interested in this
particular brand of villain, likable ones aren’t well-suited for every kind of story. There are a ton of incredible villains who
I genuinely despise, and that is a huge reason why they are so effective. If you are a writer, whether it be for games
or anything else, always consider what kind of story you want to tell. What are you going for in terms of tone? What major ideas do you want to explore? Figuring these things out will help you decide
what kind of villain is best for your story whether that be an unforgivable son-of-a-bitch,
a sympathetic monster, or a charismatic psychopath.

‘Game of Thrones’ lives on in Medieval Croatian city


>>Sreenivasan: THE HBO TELEVISION SERIES “GAME OF THRONES” SET A RECORD THIS YEAR WITH 32 EMMY NOMINATIONS FOR ITS FINAL SEASON. THEY WON IN 12 OF THOSE CATEGORIES. THE SUCCESS OF THE SHOW IS HAVING AN UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCE ON THE CITY WHERE IT WAS FILMED. TOURISTS ARE MAKING THE MEDIEVAL WALLED CITY ONE OF EUROPE’S HOTTEST TRAVEL DESTINATIONS. NEWSHOUR WEEKEND’S SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT, CHRISTOPHER LIVESAY, HAS THE STORY.>>Reporter: DUBROVNIK, CROATIA. EVEN IF YOU’VE NEVER BEEN TO THIS GEM OF THE ADRIATIC, CHANCES ARE YOU’VE SEEN THIS CITYSCAPE STRAIGHT OUT OF A FANTASY. OR, RECOGNIZE THAT MUSIC? ♪ ♪ ♪ WITH ITS SEA, ANCIENT HISTORY, AND THESE MEDIEVAL WALLS, DUBROVNIK WAS ALREADY A MAGNET FOR TOURISM. THEN, VIRTUALLY OVERNIGHT, THINGS WENT INTO HYPERDRIVE. THAT’S THE DAY THE DRAGONS CAME. THIS IS KING’S LANDING FROM “GAME OF THRONES.” FOR SEVEN OF THE SERIES’ EIGHT SEASONS, DUBROVNIK WAS THE BACKDROP OF THIS MOST IMPORTANT OF SETTINGS IN ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR AND PRAISED TV SERIES OF ALL TIME. AND IT’S BROUGHT THIS MODEST BALKAN CITY A JOLT OF NOTORIETY.>>I REMEMBER WHEN I FIRST WATCHED IT. IT WAS JUST, “OH, MY GOD!”>>WELL, FIRST, WE HEARD ABOUT THE “GAME OF THRONES,” YOU KNOW. THIS SHOW WAS SHOT HERE. AND WE WERE EXCITED ABOUT THAT.>>SO, LIKE, CROATIA, THIS WAS LIKE, ONE OF THE THINGS I WAS LOOKING FORWARD TO THE MOST, LITERALLY, WAS THE “GAME OF THRONES” TOUR.>>Reporter: THAT’S RIGHT, NOW THERE ARE “GAME OF THRONES” TOURS. OUR GUIDE, IVAN VUKOVIC, SAYS THEY’RE THE MOST POPULAR TOURS IN A TOWN VISITED BY TWO MILLION TOURISTS A YEAR, ROUGHLY DOUBLE WHAT IT GOT BEFORE THE HBO SERIES TOOK FLIGHT.>>NOW, YOU’RE GOING TO SEE THE PLACE WHERE JOHN SNOW LEFT KING’S LANDING, SENT OFF… SET OFF TO THE NORTH.>>Reporter: AND WHAT “GAME OF THRONES” TOUR WOULD BE COMPLETE WITHOUT TAKING THE WALK OF SHAME, THE ONE THAT HUMILIATED QUEEN CERSEI BEFORE ALL OF KING’S LANDING?>>SHAME!>>SHAME!>>Reporter: TODAY, TOURISTS CAN REENACT THE SCENE, AND LOCAL VENDORS ARE CASHING IN WITH SHAME FOOD, SHAME DRINKS. SHAME COCKTAILS?>>SHAME COCKTAILS, SHAME MOJITO, SHAME BURGER.>>Reporter: BUT, FOR SOME HERE, WHAT’S A “SHAME” IS SOMETHING ELSE ENTIRELY. I’M ON A “GAME OF THRONES” TOUR IN THE HEART OF THE OLD TOWN OF DUBROVNIK. NOW, THE PEOPLE ON THIS TOUR, THEY’RE HAVING A BLAST. AS FAR AS THE LOCALS? NOT SO CONVINCED.>>SOMEHOW IT GOT TO BE OVERTOURISM, SO…>>Reporter: OVERTOURISM?>>OVERTOURISM, YEAH.>>Reporter: SO, THAT MEANS THERE’S TOO MANY?>>THERE IS TOO MANY. SOMETIMES THERE IS WAY TOO MANY BECAUSE WE LIVE IN A MEDIEVAL CITY WHICH IS SURROUNDED BY THE WALLS. SO, YOU CAN’T PACK 20,000 PEOPLE TO BE IN A CITY WHICH WAS DESIGNED FOR 7,000 PEOPLE. SO, I CALL IT, IN MY WAY, A BLESSING AND A CURSE.>>Reporter: WAITER LUJO JURECIC IS ALSO OF TWO MINDS.>>IT IS A GOOD THING SINCE WE ALL HAVE OUR LIVING FROM IT. SO, IT IS A GOOD THING.>>Reporter: BUT THE TOURIST ECONOMY MEANS HE CAN’T AFFORD TO LIVE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD HE GREW UP IN, ONE THAT’S GETTING HARDER TO EVEN RECOGNIZE.>>I THINK DUBROVNIK HAS LOST ITS INTEREST AS IN A TOWN, AS ITS HISTORY, BY IT’S BECOME MORE LIKE “GAME OF THRONE’S” KING’S LANDING. IT’S A STEP FORWARD TO BRING MORE PEOPLE HERE, BUT I THINK DUBROVNIK IS LOSING ITS AUTHENTICITY.>>Reporter: BAR OWNER STJEPAN PERIC TAKES A MORE DIRE VIEW.>>(translated): I THINK EVERYONE WHO LIVES HERE WILL EVENTUALLY MOVE AWAY. THE CITY WILL BE LIKE A MUSEUM, AND PEOPLE WILL PAY A TICKET TO GET IN. THEY WON’T SEE A LIVING CITY.>>THIS TOWN NEEDS TO LIVE AND NEEDS TO CONTINUE FOR THE FUTURE. NO ONE WANTS TO COME IN DEAD TOWN.>>Reporter: MATO FRANKOVIC IS THE MAYOR OF DUBROVNIK. HE POINTS OUT THAT THE CITY AS A WHOLE HAS ONLY 42,000 RESIDENTS, ROUGHLY THE SAME NUMBER IT HAD BACK IN THE EARLY ’90s. THAT’S THE BLOODY PERIOD THAT SAW THE DISINTEGRATION OF YUGOSLAVIA AND THE SHOCKING BOMBARDMENT OF DUBROVNIK DURING THE CROATIAN-SERBIAN WAR. THE SCARS ARE STILL VISIBLE TODAY. BUT EVENTUALLY, VISITORS COULDN’T RESIST. AND WHEN THE REBOUND CAME, SPURRED BY “GAME OF THRONES,” THERE WERE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES, PARTICULARLY IN THE WALLED “OLD TOWN.” IT HAD CLOSE TO 3,000 RESIDENTS A DECADE AGO. TODAY, WITH HOMES BEING CONVERTED INTO VACATION RENTALS, THERE’S BARELY 1,000 FULL-TIMERS LIVING HERE. COMPARE THAT TO THE 10,000 TOURISTS WHO MIGHT COME IN A SINGLE DAY.>>WE HAVE A LOT OF VISITORS COMING JUST BECAUSE OF “GAME OF THRONES.” IS THAT GOOD? IT’S GOOD BECAUSE THEY’RE GOING TO SEE SOMETHING NEW AND SOMETHING UNIQUE. BUT THIS IS… AGAIN, WE ARE COMING ON THE BEGINNING, AND THIS IS AT THE MANAGEMENT OF THE TOURISM.>>Reporter: THE CITY IS MANAGING TOURISM, HE SAYS, BY LIMITING THE NUMBER OF CRUISE SHIPS AND TOUR BUSES. THE CITY HAS ALSO CUT THE NUMBER OF SOUVENIR STANDS BY 80% AND BANNED LOUD MUSIC AFTER 11:30 AT NIGHT– MEASURES IT TOOK AFTER UNESCO, THE CULTURAL BODY OF THE UNITED NATIONS, WARNED THE CITY RISKED LOSING ITS SPECIAL WORLD HERITAGE STATUS IN 2017.>>NO, NO. THEY TRIED TO KILL KING JOFFREY IN THE RIOT SCENE. NOT THIS GUY, THE BLOND GUY.>>Reporter: OF COURSE, TOUR GUIDE IVAN VUKOVIC SAYS DUBROVNIK CAN’T AFFORD TO BITE THE TOURIST HAND THAT FEEDS IT, EITHER– NOT AFTER SO MANY YEARS OF STRUGGLE, AND NOT NOW THAT “GAME OF THRONES” AIRED ITS FINAL SEASON EARLIER THIS YEAR, SOMETHING HE HOPES WON’T HURT HIS BUSINESS.>>YOU TRY TO TALK ABOUT DUBROVNIK AS AN AMAZING DESTINATION, AND NOW EVERYBODY WANTS TO SEE IT. SO, TEN YEARS AGO, I WAS BEGGING PEOPLE, LIKE, “CAN YOU VISIT US?”>>Reporter: SO, IS DUBROVNIK A VICTIM OF ITS OWN SUCCESS?>>SOMEHOW LIKE THAT. IT’S A VICTIM OF ITS OWN SUCCESS. THAT’S A PROBLEM– DON’T GETS TOO POPULAR, IF POSSIBLE.>>Reporter: OH, IS THAT YOUR ADVICE?>>(LAUGHS) IT’S MY ADVICE. LIKE, YOU TRY TO BE SUSTAINABLE, BUT IT’S VERY, VERY HARD BECAUSE YOU WILL NOT TELL THE PEOPLE “DON’T VISIT US.”

Nikolaj Coster-Waldau on Ending of Game of Thrones


ALICE MERTON. AND ON THURSDAY, DON CHEADLE, KIERNAN SHIPKA, AND MUSIC FROM HOZIER. IN SEVEN SPECTACULAR SEASONS, OUR FIRST GUEST THREW A KID OUT A WINDOW, KILLED HIS COUSIN AND DID IT WITH HIS SISTER A LOT OF TIMES, AND YET, SOMEHOW, WE’RE STILL ROOTING FOR HIM. THE EIGHTH AND FINAL SEASON OF “GAME OF THRONES” PREMIERES SUNDAY NIGHT ON HBO. PLEASE WELCOME THE KING-SLAYER, NIKOLAJ COSTER-WALDAU. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] ♪ ♪>>Jimmy: THIS IS NOT THE ONE, RIGHT? THIS IS NOT THE ONE.>>NO, IT’S ANOTHER ONE. THEY TOLD ME YOU WERE SICK.>>Jimmy: THAT’S RIGHT. YOU DID THE SMART THING. DID YOU GET TO KEEP JAMIE’S HAND? BECAUSE YOU’RE DONE SHOOTING.>>NO. THAT WAS THE ONE THING I WANTED. THE SUCCESS OF THE SHOW, HE THINK IT’S TOURING THE WORLD IN SOME EXHIBITION NOW.>>Jimmy: WAVING ON ITS OWN?>>YEAH.>>Jimmy: YOU THINK YOU’LL GET IT ONE DAY WHEN THE EXHIBITIONS ARE DONE?>>YOU WHO HOULD HOPE SO.>>Jimmy: YOU KNOW WHAT’S GOING TO HAPPEN. YOU’RE GOING TO BE ONLINE AND YOU’LL SEE IT FOR SALE AT SOME AUCTION FOR LIKE $3800. AND YOU’LL BE LIKE WHY DIDN’T THEY GIVE THAT TO ME? I HOPE SOMEBODY TRACKS IT DOWN AND GIVES IT TO YOU. SUNDAY IS, I FEEL WEIRDLY SAD ABOUT, I’M VERY EXCITED ABOUT SUNDAY BUT I’M ALSO SAD THAT IT’S ALMOST OVER.>>YEAH, NO. I’M THE SAME. IT’S THIS WEIRD MIX.>>Jimmy: IT MAKES SENSE FOR YOU, BECAUSE YOU’RE IN THE SHOW, AND I’M NOT. >>YOU KNOW THAT THING, YOU READ A REALLY GOOD BOOK. YOU GET TO THE LAST TEN PAGES AND YOU’RE LIKE, I’M GOING TO WAIT TILL TOMORROW. BECAUSE YOU KNOW THE MINUTE FINISH IT JUST SUCKS.>>Jimmy: THAT’S IT. AND WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO ON SUNDAYS? GO TO CHURCH? NO. DO YOU GO ONLINE AND READ ANY OF THE THEORIES THAT PEOPLE HAVE ABOUT WHAT IS GOING TO HAPPEN IN THE FINALE?>>I HAVE, I HAVE READ A FEW, YEAH. IT’S INTERESTING.>>Jimmy: DO YOU KNOW WHAT’S — YOU KNOW THE FINALE, RIGHT?>>I’VE KNOWN SINCE JUNE OF LAST YEAR.>>Jimmy: YOU HAVE?>>YEAH. SINCE TWO YEARS AGO. IT’S BEEN A LONG TEAM IME NOW.>>Jimmy: HOW DID YOU FIND OUT?>>NOW YOU HAVE TO DOWNLOAD AN APP. WE GOT AN APP AND THE SCRIPTS CAME, AND WHEN YOU FINISH THEM, THEY WOULD MAGICALLY DISAPPEAR.>>Jimmy: OH, REALLY? S SO YOU LEARNED, THEY END ON SNAPCHAT BASICALLY?>>SYNCHRONIZED, YEAH.>>Jimmy: DO YOU DISLIKE LEARNING YOUR LINES FROM A TABLET?>>I DISLIKE IT, YEAH. I LIKE TO MAKE NOTES. THE WEIRD THING NOW, I HAVE ALL THE OTHER SEASONS’ SCRIPTS. WE DON’T HAVE THEM FOR THIS, THAT MAKES NO SENSE.>>Jimmy: YOU CAN SCREEN SHOT THE WHOLE THING.>>YOU CAN’T, YOU CAN’T.>>Jimmy: YOU CAN’T?>>NO, THERE’S SOMETHING YOU CAN’T DO THAT.>>Jimmy: I BET I COULD.>>I GUESS COULD YOU TAKE PICTURES OF EVERYTHING.>>Jimmy: A MILLION DIFFERENT WAYS.>>THEY KNEW THEY WERE DEALING WITH ACTORS. THEY’RE NEVER GOING TO FIGURE THAT ONE OUT.>>Jimmy: SO THE FAN THEORIES, I COLLECTED SOME OF THEM. THESE ARE REAL THEORIES FROM PEOPLE ONLINE. AND SINCE YOU KNOW I WILL STUDY YOUR REACTION.>>ABSOLUTELY.>>Jimmy: I KNOW YOU CAN’T SAY WHAT’S GOING TO HAPPEN.>>I’M TERRIBLE LIAR.>>Jimmy: JAMIE WILL KILL HIS SISTER. THAT’S A THEORY.>>IT MAKES SENSE, THOUGH. IF YOU THINK ABOUT IT.>>Jimmy: IN A LOT OF WAYS, SURE.>>NEXT ONE.>>Jimmy: ARIA WILL USE THE FACE. WE WOULD THINK WOULD. JOHN SNOW BECOMES THE NIGHT KING.>>HOW?>>Jimmy: I GUESS HE GETS KILLED. DENARIS WILL TRANSFORM INTO AN ACTUAL DRAGON. SHE WILL BECOME A DRAGON.>>THAT, YEAH.>>Jimmy: OKAY. THE STARKS ARE DESCENDED FROM THE WHITE WALKERS. MANY BELIEVE THAT TO BE THE CASE.>>OKAY.>>Jimmy: BRAND STARK IS THE NIGHT KING. MANY BELIEVE BRAN IS WHO YOU GAVE A NICE LITTLE SHOVE OUT THE WINDOW AS I RECALL.>>WELL, THINK ABOUT IT THIS WAY.>>Jimmy: MM-HM.>>WHAT WOULD THE SHOW BE WITHOUT THAT?>>Jimmy: DIFFERENT, I GUESS. A LITTLE BIT DIFFERENT.>>IT WOULDN’T HAVE THE RATING, WE WOULDN’T HAVE HOLDER HOLD THE DOOR.>>Jimmy: MAYBE WE’D HAVE OTHER STUFF. ONE OTHER THEORY. FANO SNAPS HIS FINGERS AND THE STARKS TURN INTO DUST.>>I THINK THAT IS LAST NIGHT’S SHOW.>>Jimmy: I THINK THAT IS THE “AVENGERS” I’M THINKING ABOUT HERE.>>YOU KNOW, THERE’S A THEORY OF THE CHOSEN ONE WHO WILL COME BACK AND SAVE THE DAY.>>Jimmy: THE CHOSEN ONE, YES.>>AND I THINK EVERYBODY THINKS IT’S JOHN SNOW, BUT THERE’S ALSO THIS THING ABOUT A GUY CALLED BELSA.>>Jimmy: OH.>>WHICH IS A GUY WHO COMES AND MAGICALLY TRANSFORMED THIS WORLD FOR THE GOOD. SO HE WILL, WHEN EVERYTHING IS LOST, HE WILL COME AND, UP NORTH HE WILL MAGICALLY TRANSFORM THE NORTH INTO THIS BEAUTIFUL PARADISE.>>Jimmy: OH, EVERYBODY WILL BE SO MAD IF THAT WERE TO HAPPEN. THAT WOULD BE THE EQUIVALENT OF IF EVERYTHING WAS A DREAM.>>AND NOW EVERYBODY SAYS IN BIELSA WE TRUST. EVE EVERYBODY SAY THAT.>>Jimmy: WE DON’T KNOW ANY OF THAT STUFF. HAVE YOU READ ANY THAT YOU SAY OH, THAT IS CORRECT?>>YEAH, SOME. BUT I’VE NEVER READ ANYONE WHO GOT THE WHOLE THING.>>Jimmy: WHO GOT THE WHOLE THING, YEAH.>>AND WHEN I READ IT THE FIRST TIME I WAS BLOWN AWAY. I WROTE DAN AND DAVID, THE TWO CREATORS. I DON’T KNOW HOW YOU DID IT, BUT I CAN’T IMAGINE A BETTER WAY OF ENDING THE SHOW.>>Jimmy: OH, IT’S REALLY SATISFYING?>>IT IS. SAT-IS-FYING.>>Jimmy: SOME PEOPLE DIDN’T LIKE THE ENDING OF THE SOPRANOS.>>THEN, IT’S SO MUCH BETTER.>>Jimmy: IF YOU WATCH IT A SECOND TIME?>>YEAH.>>Jimmy: I’LL TAKE YOUR WORD FOR THAT.